Elytroderma Deformans Tour Handout
October 4, 2013
Bill Layton, RPF
Purpose
To bring 100 Mile House professionals together...
Discussion
DFE is significant because it has the ability to grow past the needles and into the cambium of the
tree where i...
in green current needles and in perennial infections in buds and twigs.
● The bright red of the previous year's needles is...
(Hanging Tree) The two pine trees in the foreground are roughly the same age. Both have DFE,
one severely:
Example of severely infected crown:
A badly infected branch
Example of fruiting bodies, note the black elliptical shapes on the brown needles:
Notice grey coloured needles with fruiting bodies vs. brown needles with none
Partial Bibliography
Elytroderma Needle Cast Elytroderma deformans (Weir) Darker
FIELD GUIDE TO INSECTS AND DISEASES OF AR...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Elytroderma deformans handout

376 views
277 views

Published on

Elytroderma deformans (BC code "DFE") impacts on older plantation pine in the Interior Douglas-fir biogeoclimatic subzone (IDFdk3) are significant and reducing growth on the trees in older plantations that survived the Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic. These stands are a critical part of the mid term timber supply in the wake of the IBM epidemic.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
376
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Elytroderma deformans handout

  1. 1. Elytroderma Deformans Tour Handout October 4, 2013 Bill Layton, RPF Purpose To bring 100 Mile House professionals together to look at the impacts of Elytroderma deformans (DFE) in older pine plantations (30+ years) in the 100 Mile House TSA. Problem DFE impacts on older plantation pine in the IDFdk3 are significant and reducing growth on the trees in older plantations that survived the Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic. These stands are a critical part of the mid term timber supply in the wake of the IBM epidemic. Scope DFE is particularly prevalent in the IDFdk3 subzone with severest impacts felt in pine­only plantations from 70 Mile House through to Gustafsen Lake. In the 70 Mile House area alone there is between 6,000 and 10,000 hectares severely impacted. There could be as many as 100,000ha of DFE­impacted stands in the 100MH TSA. The SBPS subzones are also impacted although more so the subzones to the west than the wetter subzone to the east (SBPSmk).
  2. 2. Discussion DFE is significant because it has the ability to grow past the needles and into the cambium of the tree where it becomes systemic, atrophying the cambium. It can have a major impact on growth by infecting branches, and even greater impact if the infection reaches the bole. DFE is common on pine trees older than 20 years within the drier subzones in the 100 Mile house TSA but most commonly the disease is a simple foliar infection. In the IDFdk3, older pine plantations have rates as high as 30% of larger trees (layers 1, 2, 3) infected. This “infection rate” refers to trees that are past the point of being acceptable as well­spaced acceptable crop trees. In worst cases (e.g., Hanging Tree on 1000 Road), as many as 1050 pine per hectare or 41% were discounted as well spaced acceptable. It’s fair to say that many of the accepted crop trees in these plantations also had DFE infections that were systemic but only on some branches or part of the crown. We developed a rule for acceptability whereby trees that had at least 50% healthy crown and positive leader growth could be considered WSA. It is common for a tree to have a badly infected lower crown and reasonable looking upper crown. If the leader has stopped growing and the top is rounded then the infection is considered too great for acceptability. Elytroderma Facts From Management Guide for Elytroderma Needle Cast, By Jim Hoffman, US Forest Service Forest; Health Protection and State Forestry Organizations, May 2004 ● Spores mature in small linear black fungal fruiting bodies during mid­ to late­ summer on needles that were infected the previous  year. Alternatively, fruiting bodies can also form on new needles that emerged from perennial infections on the buds and twigs. ● Spores are disseminated by wind to the current­years needles and germinate if there is rain or heavy dew. ● After germination the fungus grows rapidly through the needle tissues and into the twigs without initially killing the needle. Needles die the next spring, turn reddish­brown, develop fungal fruiting bodies in the summer, and  then are shed from the tree during fall rains. From Hunt, R.S. 1978. Elytroderma Disease of Pines. Forestry Canada, Forest Insect and Disease Survey, Forest Pest Leaflet No. 27 4p.) ● Once within the shoot, the fungus can grow in both directions, that is, it can keep up to the host shoot growth and also grow back down the branch, invading other branches and the tree trunk branches die (Roth, 1959). ● Elytroderma deformans overwinters in three ways: in the cast needles, as new infections
  3. 3. in green current needles and in perennial infections in buds and twigs. ● The bright red of the previous year's needles is a good indication of Elytroderma deformans infection, but experience is necessary to separate this from winter damage, or other needle cast fungi ● The bright red needles gradually fade to a straw color (Fig) and on lodgepole pine the needles may become gray. ● The dwarf mistletoe also produces brooms and brown lesions in the inner bark of lodgepole pine shoots but is readily separated from E. deformans by observing the parasitic plants. ● Severe infection results in so much needle casting that only the current needles remain over much of the crown, producing "lion's tail" symptoms. ● Deformities: Needles and shoots are shorter and twigs may be thickened and curved upward. On some trees there is loss of apical dominance so that lateral buds grow and the whole tree resembles a broom. ● The fungus damages the tree by decomposing areas of phloem (Waters, 1962), causing brooms that act as nutrient sinks and causing dwarfing, deformations and vigor loss. ● Severe infection can result in increment loss and predisposition to other agents.,especially bark beetles and root rots. Thus, it is thus difficult to estimate mortality directly from this fungus. ● Once perennial (systemic) infection is established, the fungus can spread vegetatively within the tree so that the impact continues for several years. ● Childs (1968) found that the more severe the crown symptoms, the less the annual increment, and this deleterious effect increases with time, especially on larger trees. ● Volume reduction may be as great as 50%. ● Disease intensity on lodgepole pine in some areas of the Cariboo and Kootenay Forest Districts is very high, but studies have not been made to measure its impact (that was in 1978) ● Practical control depends on silvicultural manipulations such as clear cuttings in mature stands and thinnings to promote vigorous growth in young stands. ● Vigorously growing young stands can outgrow infections in the lower crown (Childs, 1968). ● On valuable trees, pruning out infections, especially brooms, which have potential to grow into the mainstem, is recommended.
  4. 4. (Hanging Tree) The two pine trees in the foreground are roughly the same age. Both have DFE, one severely:
  5. 5. Example of severely infected crown:
  6. 6. A badly infected branch
  7. 7. Example of fruiting bodies, note the black elliptical shapes on the brown needles:
  8. 8. Notice grey coloured needles with fruiting bodies vs. brown needles with none
  9. 9. Partial Bibliography Elytroderma Needle Cast Elytroderma deformans (Weir) Darker FIELD GUIDE TO INSECTS AND DISEASES OF ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO FORESTS References Boyce, J.S. 1961. Forest Pathology. 3rd ed. McGraw­Hill Co. Pub. Childs, T.W. 1968. Elytroderma disease of ponderosa pine in the Pacific northwest. U.S.D.A. For. Serv. Res. Pap. PNW­69. Hepting, G.H. 1971, Diseases of forest and shade trees of the United States. U.S.D.A. For. Serv. Handbook No. 386. Lightle, P.C. 1954. The pathology of Elytroderma deformans on ponderosa pine. Phytopathology 44: 557­569. Lightle, P.C. 1955. Experiments on control of Elytroderma needle blight of pines by sprays. U.S.D.A. For. Serv., Ca. For. & Range Exp. Sta. For. Res. Note No. 92. Roth, L.F, 1959. Perennial infection of ponderosa pine by Elytroderma deformans. For. Sci. 5: 182­191. Waters, C.W. 1962, Significance of life history studies of Elytroderma deformans. For. Sci. 8: 250­254.

×