Learner Objectives 
Participants will:
• Review laws and codes of ethics pertaining to speech 
language pathologists
• Hi...
Why study ethics?
 New requirement of the State Board of Examiners:  
• Licensees who renew between May 2009 and December...
National Environment
2002
Finland
Denmark
New Zealand
United States (20th)
Haiti
Iran
20012000
Finland
Denmark
New Zealand...
Do you need Continuing Education or want 
to listen to this course live?
Click here to visit 
the online courses.
Click for Audio‐over‐Powerpoint Presentation
Probing the Field of Law
 A study of California lawyers bar association stated that they were sick of 
the decline in hon...
Trying to correct the downward 
trend.
“At present, several state bars and
professional organizations are scrambling
to s...
Ethical Studies by MIT
Study 1
50 math 
questions
Study 2
15 math 
questions + 
Book Lists
Study 3
20 math 
questions
+ Et...
How are ethics codes different from 
laws?
Rules of Ethics are specific statements of 
minimally acceptable professional c...
What are Ethics?
 A discipline dealing with right conduct and 
morality.  (Webster’s, 2001)
“moral principles or values ...
How our behavior reflects on 
the entire profession
How our behavior reflects on 
the entire profession
How our behavior reflects on 
the entire profession
How our behavior reflects on 
the entire profession
Serena William
 Examples from other fields:
Outcome of his actions
All of the documents and charts in this presentation 
can be downloaded from our Free Resource Library.
Click here to visi...
What are Ethics?
 Actions that Allow Social Interaction (Socrates)
 Actions that Promote Personal Happiness (Aristotle)
...
What are Ethics?
Actions that Allow Social 
Interaction
Socrates
“The truly wise man will know 
what is right, do what i...
What are Ethics?
Actions that Promote 
Personal Happiness
Aristotle
In Aristotle's view, when a 
person acts in accordan...
What are Ethics?
Actions that Promote Peace of Mind
Epictetus
“the greatest good was contentment 
and serenity”
We get ...
What are Ethics?
Epicurus
 Hedonism, responding to one’s own 
desire without consideration for the 
greater of society
 ...
Our discussion today
 The original intent of Ethics, it was meant as a way 
of creating dialogue.
 This dialogue is crea...
What are Ethics?
 Actions that Allow Social Interaction (Socrates)
 Actions that Promote Personal Happiness (Aristotle)
...
Rules of Ethics are specific statements of minimally 
acceptable professional conduct or of prohibitions and 
are applicab...
WE ARE ASHA MEMBERS, TSHA MEMBERS, 
IDEA OBIDERS, AND TEXAS LICENSE 
HOLDERS.  EACH ENTITY HAS  CONDUCT 
GUIDELINES OR COD...
Principles of Ethics I
Personal Responsibility
“Individuals shall honor their responsibility 
to hold paramount the welfar...
 Not guarantee results of treatment
 Not provide services solely by correspondence
 Adequately maintain secure records
...
 Provide services competently
 Use every resource, including referral, to ensure 
highest quality service
 Not discrimi...
Principles of Ethics I ‐
Personal Responsibility
Case Study:
• You do an initial school evaluation for a 4‐year‐old stude...
Principles of Ethics II
Professional Competence
“Individuals shall honor their responsibility 
to achieve and maintain the...
 Provide clinical services only when certified
 Operate within the scope of their competence, 
considering their educati...
Principles of Ethics II
Professional Competence
Case Study:
• You are a bilingual student completing a clinical 
rotation...
Principles of Ethics 
III
Responsibility to the Public
“Individuals shall honor their responsibility 
to the public by pro...
 Not misrepresent their credentials, 
competence, education, training, or experience
 Not participate in professional ac...
 Not misrepresent services, research results, or 
products to colleagues
 Exercise professional judgment when providing ...
Principles of Ethics III
Responsibility  to the Public
Case Study:
• A bilingual student did not show for his Child Find ...
Principles of Ethics IV
Responsibility to the Profession
“Individuals shall honor their responsibilities 
to professionals...
 Prohibit those under their supervision from 
engaging in practice violating code of ethics
 Not engage in dishonesty, f...
 Not misrepresent services, research results, or 
products to colleagues
 Exercise professional judgment when providing ...
Principles of Ethics IV
Responsibility to the Profession
Case Study:
• We are considering developing an electronic recept...
Case Studies
Divide into groups
Review your case
Decide:
1. Which Principles  are violated
2. Which Ethic Rule is in Viola...
Case Study A
 Your group of school SLPs serves some children in the 
community.  Due to increasing caseloads on certain 
...
Case Study B
 A teacher reports to you that she has a bilingual student in 
her class who she is concerned about.  She we...
Case Study #2
 A parent denies bilingual services.  You believe that the 
student will benefit from speech services in Sp...
Case Study #1
 You do an initial school evaluation for a 6‐year‐old student, 
Maria, who is predominantly Spanish speakin...
Case Study #5
 You evaluate a 3‐year‐old student, Ana, who is predominantly 
Spanish speaking and is using only one‐word ...
 You do a Child Find evaluation.  The mother brings a copy of a 
report from a private practice that was done a few month...
 Your supervisor asks you to complete 45‐minute sessions with 
your students in a 40‐minute period, stating that they are...
 You are one of the few bilingual SLPs in the Grande ISD and 
your caseload reaches 60 students across 6 campuses.  You d...
 Your supervisor lays out a schedule for you, the bilingual SLP, 
that looks like this:
• 8‐8:30 Billy at Stromville Elem...
Ethics today
Medical Ethics
Legal Ethics
Business Ethics
Ethics in Religion
Ethics in Race
Relational Ethics
Milita...
Ethics through Case Study
Principles of Ethics I ‐
Personal Responsibility
Case Study:
• A parent of one of your student goes to a local clinic to ...
Principles of Ethics II
Professional Competence
Case Study:
• You work in the Po‐Dunk ISD.  You took 4 semesters of 
Span...
Principles of Ethics III
Responsibility  to the Public
Case Study:
• You and your colleagues are over‐worked bilingual SL...
Principles of Ethics IV
Responsibility to the Profession
Case Study:
• Near the end of the school year you run out of CEL...
Click to visit www.bilinguistics.com
Ethical Considerations with CLD Populations
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Ethical Considerations with CLD Populations

1,355 views
1,168 views

Published on

This is a review of laws and codes of ethics pertaining to speech-language pathologists. It highlights legal issues in serving a bilingual population. This presentation considers case studies of ethical issues related to working with culturally and linguistically diverse populations and identifies sections of the Codes of Ethics that assist in decision-making for case studies.

Published in: Education, Spiritual, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,355
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
39
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ethical Considerations with CLD Populations

  1. 1. Learner Objectives  Participants will: • Review laws and codes of ethics pertaining to speech  language pathologists • Highlight legal issues in serving a bilingual population • Consider case studies of ethical issues related to working  with culturally and linguistically diverse populations. • Identify sections of the Codes of Ethics that assist in  decision‐making for case studies.
  2. 2. Why study ethics?  New requirement of the State Board of Examiners:   • Licensees who renew between May 2009 and December 2009 have  until December 31, 2009 to acquire two clock hours in ethics for the  previous renewal period. • 2 hour per 20 CEUs will be required for future renewal period.  It makes us better people?  Because we have to be! Why have the requirements changed? Why now? What happened?
  3. 3. National Environment 2002 Finland Denmark New Zealand United States (20th) Haiti Iran 20012000 Finland Denmark New Zealand United States (14th) Haiti Iran
  4. 4. Do you need Continuing Education or want  to listen to this course live? Click here to visit  the online courses.
  5. 5. Click for Audio‐over‐Powerpoint Presentation
  6. 6. Probing the Field of Law  A study of California lawyers bar association stated that they were sick of  the decline in honor in their work and were “profoundly pessimistic.” Two‐ thirds said that lawyers  “compromise their professionalism as a result of  economic pressure.”  A study by the Maryland Judicial Task Force had similar findings.  Lawyers  felt their profession had degenerated so badly that “they were often  irritable, short‐tempered, argumentative, and verbally abusive.”  Lawyers in Virginia were asked whether the increasing problems in  professionalism were attributable to “a few bad apples” or to a  widespread trend.  They overwhelmingly said this was a widespread issue.  Lawyers in Florida reported that a “substantial minority [were] money  grabbing, too clever, tricky, sneaky, and not trustworthy.”
  7. 7. Trying to correct the downward  trend. “At present, several state bars and professional organizations are scrambling to shore up their professional ethics. Some are increasing courses in college and graduate schools, and others are requiring brush-up ethics classes.” So what can we do? How do we change a professions ethical behavior?
  8. 8. Ethical Studies by MIT Study 1 50 math  questions Study 2 15 math  questions +  Book Lists Study 3 20 math  questions + Ethics Code Group 1 Control  32.1/50 Group 2 Test Group 3 Test 36.2/50 36.2/50 3.1/15 4.1/15 3.0/15 3.0/20 5.5/20 3.o/20
  9. 9. How are ethics codes different from  laws? Rules of Ethics are specific statements of  minimally acceptable professional conduct  or of prohibitions and are applicable to all  individuals. Laws are legal documents setting forth rules  governing a particular kind of activity.
  10. 10. What are Ethics?  A discipline dealing with right conduct and  morality.  (Webster’s, 2001) “moral principles or values that address  whether actions, intentions, and goals are  right or wrong” (Herer, 1989)  The main ethical category for ancient  Greeks was arete or virtue List of Rules
  11. 11. How our behavior reflects on  the entire profession
  12. 12. How our behavior reflects on  the entire profession
  13. 13. How our behavior reflects on  the entire profession
  14. 14. How our behavior reflects on  the entire profession Serena William  Examples from other fields:
  15. 15. Outcome of his actions
  16. 16. All of the documents and charts in this presentation  can be downloaded from our Free Resource Library. Click here to visit the Resource Library
  17. 17. What are Ethics?  Actions that Allow Social Interaction (Socrates)  Actions that Promote Personal Happiness (Aristotle)  Actions that Promote Peace of Mind (Epectetus)  Actions that do not reflect poorly on  society  (profession) (Epicurus)
  18. 18. What are Ethics? Actions that Allow Social  Interaction Socrates “The truly wise man will know  what is right, do what is good,  and therefore be happy.” Ethics is a conversation that  enables people to interact  communally within a society
  19. 19. What are Ethics? Actions that Promote  Personal Happiness Aristotle In Aristotle's view, when a  person acts in accordance  with his nature and realizes  his full potential, he will do  good and be content.
  20. 20. What are Ethics? Actions that Promote Peace of Mind Epictetus “the greatest good was contentment  and serenity” We get to go to work each day  knowing we will be respected and  valued
  21. 21. What are Ethics? Epicurus  Hedonism, responding to one’s own  desire without consideration for the  greater of society  Guidance of actions that do not reflect  poorly on  society (a professional’s  field)
  22. 22. Our discussion today  The original intent of Ethics, it was meant as a way  of creating dialogue.  This dialogue is created by: 1) naming or bringing to  attention a goal or value 2) putting it to the test  with rigorous discussion  about real life  circumstances.
  23. 23. What are Ethics?  Actions that Allow Social Interaction (Socrates)  Actions that Promote Personal Happiness (Aristotle)  Actions that Promote Peace of Mind (Epectetus)  Actions that do not reflect poorly on  society  (profession) (Epicurus)
  24. 24. Rules of Ethics are specific statements of minimally  acceptable professional conduct or of prohibitions and  are applicable to all individuals.   Divided into 4 Principles: •Personal •Professional Competence •Public •Responsibility to the Profession
  25. 25. WE ARE ASHA MEMBERS, TSHA MEMBERS,  IDEA OBIDERS, AND TEXAS LICENSE  HOLDERS.  EACH ENTITY HAS  CONDUCT  GUIDELINES OR CODES OF ETHICS.   FORTUNATELY THEY ARE ALL VERY  SIMILAR. WE ARE GOING TO USE THE ASHA CODE  BECAUSE IT IS THE MOST ENCOMPASSING. 
  26. 26. Principles of Ethics I Personal Responsibility “Individuals shall honor their responsibility  to hold paramount the welfare of persons  they serve professionally or participants in  research and scholarly activities and shall  treat animals involved in research in a  humane manner.”
  27. 27.  Not guarantee results of treatment  Not provide services solely by correspondence  Adequately maintain secure records  Not reveal information about clients without  authorization unless doing so is necessary to  protect the welfare of the client or community  Not charge for services not rendered  Obtain informed consent for research  Seek help for substance‐abuse problems that  affect professional services
  28. 28.  Provide services competently  Use every resource, including referral, to ensure  highest quality service  Not discriminate in the delivery of services  Not misrepresent credentials of assistants or  support personnel  Not delegate tasks that require a CCC’s unique  skills, knowledge and judgment  Inform clients of possible effects of services  rendered  Evaluate the effectiveness of services rendered
  29. 29. Principles of Ethics I ‐ Personal Responsibility Case Study: • You do an initial school evaluation for a 4‐year‐old student,  Jose, whose family uses only Spanish in the home.  He has  very limited English exposure.  He was diagnosed 9 months  prior with severe expressive and receptive language  disorder at a private practice. They provided speech  therapy in English for 6 months until the mother decided  she was wasting her money because services were in  English.  The mother asks you your opinion.  • What do you do?  
  30. 30. Principles of Ethics II Professional Competence “Individuals shall honor their responsibility  to achieve and maintain the highest level of  professional competence.”
  31. 31.  Provide clinical services only when certified  Operate within the scope of their competence,  considering their education, training, and  experience  Continue professional development  Delegate service provision only to those who  are qualified/appropriately supervised  Not require or permit staff to perform services  that exceed their level of competence  Ensure that all equipment is in proper working  order
  32. 32. Principles of Ethics II Professional Competence Case Study: • You are a bilingual student completing a clinical  rotation.  You observe an evaluation in which an  English‐dominant SLP administers a receptive  vocabulary task in Spanish.  She mispronounces the  words.  You know what she is saying but the student  does not appear to understand so you say the word  correctly and the student get the item correct.  The  supervising SLP asks you not to interrupt her testing  session again.  She diagnoses the student with a  moderate receptive language impairment.
  33. 33. Principles of Ethics  III Responsibility to the Public “Individuals shall honor their responsibility  to the public by promoting public  understanding of the professions, by  supporting the development of services  designed to fulfill the unmet needs to the  public.”
  34. 34.  Not misrepresent their credentials,  competence, education, training, or experience  Not participate in professional activities that  constitute a conflict of interest  Refer solely on the basis of the interest of the  client and not on any personal financial interest  Not misrepresent diagnostic information,  research, services rendered or products  dispensed, or engage in any scheme to obtain  payment for such services or products  Adhere to professional standards when  advertising or marketing their services
  35. 35.  Not misrepresent services, research results, or  products to colleagues  Exercise professional judgment when providing  professional services  Not discriminate in their relationships with  colleagues, students, and members of related  professions  Inform the Board of Ethics when they have  reason to believe others have violated the code  of ethics  Comply with the policies of the Board of Ethics
  36. 36. Principles of Ethics III Responsibility  to the Public Case Study: • A bilingual student did not show for his Child Find  screening.  You check with the bilingual SLP about  rescheduling and she reports that the parents are very  busy so instead of having them come in, she did the  screening over the phone and determined that the student  did not need further evaluation. 
  37. 37. Principles of Ethics IV Responsibility to the Profession “Individuals shall honor their responsibilities  to professionals and colleagues, and  students.  Individuals shall uphold and  accept the professions’ self‐imposed  standards.”
  38. 38.  Prohibit those under their supervision from  engaging in practice violating code of ethics  Not engage in dishonesty, fraud, deceit,  misrepresentation, …  Not engage in sexual activities with their clients  or their students  Assign credit only to those who have  contributed to publications, presentations, and  products  Reference the ideas of others
  39. 39.  Not misrepresent services, research results, or  products to colleagues  Exercise professional judgment when providing  professional services  Not discriminate in their relationships with  colleagues, students, and members of related  professions  Inform the Board of Ethics when they have  reason to believe others have violated the code  of ethics  Comply with the policies of the Board of Ethics
  40. 40. Principles of Ethics IV Responsibility to the Profession Case Study: • We are considering developing an electronic receptive‐expressive  vocabulary test.  The plan is that a monolingual (English speaking) SLP  or aide could monitor the test administration. The computer program  would capture the responses with a voice capture and automatically  score the response. This could be used as a preliminary screening  measure when bilingual speech and language resources are limited.  We could recommend follow up testing by a bilingual SLP to confirm  poor performance on the computer administration. This may be a way  to have a large number of Spanish speaking children tested when  bilingual resources are limited.  Do you see something like that  working, or would there be problems with this type of test  administration?  We would be very interested in your comments.
  41. 41. Case Studies Divide into groups Review your case Decide: 1. Which Principles  are violated 2. Which Ethic Rule is in Violation 3. How you will respond to the situation
  42. 42. Case Study A  Your group of school SLPs serves some children in the  community.  Due to increasing caseloads on certain  campuses, you shift some duties.  You (female SLP) were  seeing a student in the community and inform the family that  another (male) SLP from your group will be taking over.  The  family says that they do not want a male SLP working with  their son.
  43. 43. Case Study B  A teacher reports to you that she has a bilingual student in  her class who she is concerned about.  She went to her  principal to find out how to refer her for speech‐language  testing and the principal told her they already had too many  Hispanic students in special education so she should not make  the referral.
  44. 44. Case Study #2  A parent denies bilingual services.  You believe that the  student will benefit from speech services in Spanish and that  if services are done in English you will be teaching English  rather than addressing underlying language deficits.  Your  supervisor tells you that you need to do services in English.
  45. 45. Case Study #1  You do an initial school evaluation for a 6‐year‐old student,  Maria, who is predominantly Spanish speaking.  There is an  evaluation report in her folder from a private practice two  months prior.  The only information provided is a list of the  items the child got correct and those that the child missed on  a standardized test.  Receptive and expressive language skills  are reported as severely disordered.  Your evaluation indicates typical receptive language skills and  moderately delayed expressive language skills.
  46. 46. Case Study #5  You evaluate a 3‐year‐old student, Ana, who is predominantly  Spanish speaking and is using only one‐word utterances.   Fewer than 5% of her utterances are English.  Her older sister  (6) is in an English classroom because the district does not  have a bilingual program so Ana is starting to hear more  English.  You recommend speech services in Spanish.  The  district asks you to recommend half Spanish and half English  for speech services.
  47. 47.  You do a Child Find evaluation.  The mother brings a copy of a  report from a private practice that was done a few months  earlier.  The SLP used the PLS‐3‐English with an interpreter  and reported the norms from the English version.  The results  indicated a severe expressive and receptive language delay.   
  48. 48.  Your supervisor asks you to complete 45‐minute sessions with  your students in a 40‐minute period, stating that they are  students receiving Medicaid and the Medicaid regulations  state that if you complete at least 7 minutes of your last 15‐ minute unit, you can report it as a complete 15‐minute unit. 
  49. 49.  You are one of the few bilingual SLPs in the Grande ISD and  your caseload reaches 60 students across 6 campuses.  You do  not feel you are able to provide effective services to that  many children.   What do you do?  
  50. 50.  Your supervisor lays out a schedule for you, the bilingual SLP,  that looks like this: • 8‐8:30 Billy at Stromville Elementary • 8:30‐8:45 travel 12 miles to to Batesville Elementary • 8:45‐9:45 therapy with a group of 4 students • 9:45‐10:00 travel 15 miles to Brook Elementary • 10:00‐11:00 Group of 5 students • 11:00‐12:00 Group of 5 students • 12:00‐1:00 Lunch and travel 45 miles to Cramville • 1:00‐3:00 Two groups of 4 students each. 
  51. 51. Ethics today Medical Ethics Legal Ethics Business Ethics Ethics in Religion Ethics in Race Relational Ethics Military Ethics Cultural Ethics
  52. 52. Ethics through Case Study
  53. 53. Principles of Ethics I ‐ Personal Responsibility Case Study: • A parent of one of your student goes to a local clinic to  get additional services.  The clinic tells the parent that  they will put the family on their waiting list of 150  people and that they can expect to wait 8‐10 months  before they will receive services.  When the family asks   the clinic where else they might go, the clinic provides  no suggestions.
  54. 54. Principles of Ethics II Professional Competence Case Study: • You work in the Po‐Dunk ISD.  You took 4 semesters of  Spanish in high school and are able to greet people in  Spanish and understand some frequent vocabulary.  Your  boss asks you to evaluate a child whose predominant  language is Spanish?    • What do you do?  
  55. 55. Principles of Ethics III Responsibility  to the Public Case Study: • You and your colleagues are over‐worked bilingual SLPs in  the schools.  Your colleague evaluates a student who just  barely qualifies based on testing results. She cannot handle  another child on her caseload.  Since the student was only  moderately delayed, she decides that it would be best not  to qualify the student.  She tells the teacher that the  student was borderline and therefore does not qualify for  services but to notify her if concerns continue for more  than 6 months.
  56. 56. Principles of Ethics IV Responsibility to the Profession Case Study: • Near the end of the school year you run out of CELF‐4  protocols but still have many more evaluations to  complete.  You tell your supervisor you need more  protocols and she informs you that there is no budget for  that and you will have to make photocopies of the  protocols for the rest of the school year.
  57. 57. Click to visit www.bilinguistics.com

×