TEACHING MATERIALS 1
9.2
200 YEARS THAT
CHANGED THE WORLD
Introduction
All throughout the Big History Project, we’ve looke...
TEACHING MATERIALS 2
2. Find the chart, Coal consumption, per person, which is on the fourth page. Select
the Visualize op...
TEACHING MATERIALS 3
9.2
200 YEARS THAT
CHANGED THE WORLD
Introduction
All throughout the Big History Project, we’ve looke...
TEACHING MATERIALS 4
Once you have the basics down, make sure other students are getting the hang of it. If
everyone is in...
TEACHING MATERIALS 5
9.2
200 YEARS THAT
CHANGED THE WORLD
WORKSHEET
Go to Gapminder.org/data and select a chart that inter...
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200 Years That Changed the World

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In the last 200 years we've experienced change like never before. Pick a dataset from this period and break it down!

Website: https://www.bighistoryproject.com/portal
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bighistoryproject
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BigHistoryPro

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200 Years That Changed the World

  1. 1. TEACHING MATERIALS 1 9.2 200 YEARS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD Introduction All throughout the Big History Project, we’ve looked at trends dating back to the Big Bang. However, the last 200 years have represented a dramatic change in these trends. Looking at the data, the changes can be quite impressive. Gapminder.org provides a powerful set of tools for examining an impressive variety of data sets. Each chart allows students to track changes over time and isolate specific countries. This activity challenges students to identify a data set, explain it to the class, and share their insights on the causes and impacts of the changes illustrated in the data. Working with data is a critical skill, particularly in the social sciences and is specifically called out in the Common Core State Standards for ELA. More important, students need to learn to engage with data thoughtfully, understanding both how to use it and how it can be misused in service of an argument. Preparation for the activity This activity is greatly enhanced with a reliable Internet connection. If a reliable connection isn’t possible, you can download an offline version of Gapminder for use without a connection or you can select data to present to the class and have them use the supporting worksheet. If they’re using Gapminder for the first time, students may need some guidance. However, once they get oriented to the style of charts and where to find the specific controls, they will explore the site on their own to find data that interests them. To start, it can be helpful to ask the entire class to find the same chart, select two countries, and slide the timeline. Walking around the room, it’s easy to identify students that might need a little help learning to use the tools. Generally, other students that have mastered the tool quickly should be able to get the other students oriented. You might use the following steps, though feel free to substitute with your own choices. 1. Go to Gapminder.org/data
  2. 2. TEACHING MATERIALS 2 2. Find the chart, Coal consumption, per person, which is on the fourth page. Select the Visualize option to open the chart. 3. Once the chart is open, select two countries from the list to the right to highlight their data. 4. Finally, ask the students to move the timeline slider to 1985, or some specific data. This simply makes it easier to check that everyone knows how to use the slider. Then, ask them to press the play button to see the data change over time. Once the students are oriented to the tool, instruct them to explore the other data sets and select one to explore on their own, and then complete the 200 Years worksheet. Presenting their findings Once students are done with reviewing their chart, ask students to share their results with the class. It can be helpful to break the class into groups and share their results amongst themselves. Each group should help students refine their observations and improve them. Finally, ask a few students from the class to share their observations at the end.    
  3. 3. TEACHING MATERIALS 3 9.2 200 YEARS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD Introduction All throughout the Big History Project, we’ve looked at trends dating back to the Big Bang. However, the last 200 years have represented a dramatic change in these trends. How many people are born each year? How many people die? How common is polio or malaria? How much money do people make in the U.S. versus Brazil? These are just a few of the statistics you can explore at Gapminder.org. This site provides a powerful set of tools for examining an impressive variety of data sets. Each chart allows you to track changes over time and isolate information about specific countries. In this activity, you will pick a chart that interests you, explain it to the class, and share your take on what you think the data shows: Is there a trend you can identify? What might the implications be for the future? Preparation for the activity This activity is works best if you have a reliable Internet connection. However, it is possible to download an offline version of Gapminder for use without a connection. Your teacher will help you figure out how best to get the information you need. Gapminder is a powerful site, and a little more complicated than the average website. Work together with your classmates to make sure everyone gets the basics before delving into the activity itself. As a warm up, try this: • Go to Gapminder.org/data • Find the chart called Coal consumption, per person, which is on the fourth page. Select the Visualize option to open the chart. • Once the chart is open, select two countries from the list to the right to highlight their data. • Finally, move the timeline slider to 1985. Then, press the play button to see how the data changes over time.    
  4. 4. TEACHING MATERIALS 4 Once you have the basics down, make sure other students are getting the hang of it. If everyone is in good shape, go ahead and explore the other charts and select one that interests you. Then, complete the 200 Years worksheet. Presenting your findings Once you’ve finished reviewing your chart, be prepared to share your results with the class. Your teacher may ask you to work in groups to share and refine your observations.
  5. 5. TEACHING MATERIALS 5 9.2 200 YEARS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD WORKSHEET Go to Gapminder.org/data and select a chart that interests you. As you view the data, complete the table below detailing what you saw and your thoughts about what the data indicates. You may want to play the time sequence multiple times (just reset the slider and press Play). Name: Chart Title: In your own words, describe what the data in the table tells you. (For example: This table compares the average amount of money people earn with how much coal they use.) What trends do you notice in the data? What country’s data sticks out to you? Why? What might be causing this trend? What impact do you think this trend will have on areas such as business, the environment, and health?

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