Intergenerational Learning and Sustainable
Development
Dr. Alan Hatton-Yeo M.B.E.
Chief Executive, Beth Johnson Foundation
The Beth Johnson Foundation established in 1972 to take an
evidence based approach to ageing
Older people as active, value...
• Intergenerational Learning (IL) is defined by the European
Map of Intergenerational Learning (EMIL) as:
• “The way that ...
Intergenerational practice aims to bring people together in
purposeful, mutually beneficial activities which promote great...
• Characteristics of IP
• Aims to bring people together in purposeful, mutually beneficial
activities
• Promotes greater u...
We suggest that the dynamic, vibrant, engaged, sustainable rural
community in the future would display a number of interre...
So how does Intergenerational Learning contribute to
sustainability?
By developing practical ways to think about demograph...
"No one is born a good citizen; no
nation is born a democracy. Rather,
both are processes that continue to
evolve over a l...
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Big Foot Conferenece. June 5. Intergenerational learning & sustainable development_ Alan Hatton-Yeo, Keynote presentation

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Alan Hatton-Yeo, Chief Executive Officer of the Beth-Johnson-Foundation, UK and Coordinator of the European Map of Intergenerational Learning Intergenerational Learning and Sustainable Development was a special guest and keynote speaker at the conference

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Big Foot Conferenece. June 5. Intergenerational learning & sustainable development_ Alan Hatton-Yeo, Keynote presentation

  1. 1. Intergenerational Learning and Sustainable Development Dr. Alan Hatton-Yeo M.B.E. Chief Executive, Beth Johnson Foundation
  2. 2. The Beth Johnson Foundation established in 1972 to take an evidence based approach to ageing Older people as active, valued actors in their communities – asset based approach Centre for Intergenerational Practice Linking Generations Northern Ireland Generations Together Cymru Generations Working Together Scotland The European Map of Intergenerational Learning (EMIL) The European Certificate of Intergenerational Learning
  3. 3. • Intergenerational Learning (IL) is defined by the European Map of Intergenerational Learning (EMIL) as: • “The way that people of all ages can learn together and from each other. IL is an important part of Lifelong Learning, where the generations work together to gain skills, values and knowledge. Beyond the transfer of knowledge, IL fosters reciprocal learning relationships between different generations and helps to develop social capital and social cohesion in our ageing societies. IL is one way of addressing the significant demographic change we are experiencing across Europe and is as a way of enhancing intergenerational solidarity through intergenerational practice (IP).” (http://www.emil-network.eu/
  4. 4. Intergenerational practice aims to bring people together in purposeful, mutually beneficial activities which promote greater understanding and respect between generations and contributes to building more cohesive communities. Intergenerational practice is inclusive, building on the positive resources that the young and old have to offer each other and those around them (Beth Johnson Foundation, 2001)
  5. 5. • Characteristics of IP • Aims to bring people together in purposeful, mutually beneficial activities • Promotes greater understanding and respect between generations • Contributes towards building more sustainable communities. • Is inclusive and builds on the positive resources that the young and old have to offer each other and those around them • An effective way to address a number of issues such as – building active communities – promoting citizenship – regenerating neighbourhoods – addressing inequality
  6. 6. We suggest that the dynamic, vibrant, engaged, sustainable rural community in the future would display a number of interrelated characteristics: • Identifying, utilising and optimising assets • Achieving fairness for everyone • Empowering local governance • Increasing resources for community benefit • Enjoying locally relevant services • Enriching social capital and well-being • Valuing local distinctiveness • Developing reliable infrastructure • Enhancing environmental capacity • Supporting a dynamic local economy Carnegie Enquiry on Sustainable Rural Development
  7. 7. So how does Intergenerational Learning contribute to sustainability? By developing practical ways to think about demographic change and generational interdependency - Amztell the Generational Village, Germany Skills Exchange and learning together and from one another Co-production between the generations to design their own solutions - Urbivore Economic stimulation Build It Strengthening relationships across the Generations Arquivo do Coa Portugal,
  8. 8. "No one is born a good citizen; no nation is born a democracy. Rather, both are processes that continue to evolve over a lifetime." -- Kofi Annan www.bjf.org.uk www.emil-network.eu

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