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Big duck ntc_brandraising_4-8-10

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My presentation on 'Brandraising: One Organization, Many Channels' with National Military Family Association and Cross-Cultural Solutions at the 2010 Nonprofit Technology Conference (NTC).

My presentation on 'Brandraising: One Organization, Many Channels' with National Military Family Association and Cross-Cultural Solutions at the 2010 Nonprofit Technology Conference (NTC).

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  • 1. Brandraising: One Organization, Many Channels #10ntc.brdrsg (??) #10ntc
  • 2. Oh, what fun we’ll have! •  Sarah Durham, Big Duck What is Brandraising, anyway? •  Michelle Joyner, National Military Family Association One org’s experience Brandraising: why they did it, what they got out of it, and more. •  Kam Santos, Cross Cultural Solutions What if your org requires a different approach? Lessons learned. •  Margaret Battistelli, Fundraising Success Magazine Moderator for discussion/q and a
  • 3. •  Tweets @bigducksarah •  Blogs at bigducknyc.com/blog •  Nonprofit communications nerd •  Mom of identical twins! •  Crazy about Brooklyn •  Likes to make up words
  • 4. ©golancasterpa
  • 5. Reasons Nonprofits Communicate Fundraising Programs Advocacy
  • 6. ®
  • 7. Positioning The big, differentiating idea you strive to own in the minds of your target audiences. © Daniel Aubry
  • 8. Personality
  • 9. vs.
  • 10. Auburn Theological Seminary- Positioning Auburn is the most trusted resource for leaders at the intersection of religion and public life.
  • 11. Auburn Theological Seminary- Personality •  Open (progressive, liberal) •  Multifaith (interfaith, pluralistic) •  Entrepreneurial (innovative, pioneering, groundbreaking, responsive) •  Bold (courageous, challenging, passionate, dynamic, activist) •  Rigorous (thoughtful, intellectual, smart) •  Respected (venerated, rooted, leader)
  • 12. Auburn Theological Seminary- Vision In a fragmented, complex, and violent time, we envision religion as a catalyst and resource for a new world—one in which difference is celebrated, abundance is shared, and people are hopeful, working for a future that is better than today.
  • 13. Auburn Theological Seminary- Mission We equip bold and resilient leaders who can bridge religious divides, build community, pursue justice, and heal the world. Rooted in Christian tradition with multifaith commitments, we seek the best strategies to respond to today’s biggest challenges.
  • 14. Auburn Theological Seminary- Key Messages Our World: Where religion is seen as a problem. Until the past few decades, political, religious, and public leaders in the United States took it for granted that their Protestant values were shared by most Americans. They rarely needed special tools and resources to lead and express their views publicly. Our Solution: The Auburn Leader. We equip bold and resilient leaders who can bridge religious divides, build community, pursue justice, and heal the world. Your Role. You can help us bridge religious divides, build community, pursue justice, and heal the world. Our History. We have nearly 200 years of experience preparing religious leaders for the real world, from our founding in 1818 in upstate New York to a global presence today.
  • 15. If you love something set it free
  • 16. Online Communication Opportunities
  • 17. ®
  • 18. The Value of Brandraising •  Less time spent creating- more time spent reinforcing •  Donors, clients, and other audiences more likely to “get it” •  Clear basis to develop materials, strategies and campaigns upon •  Established way to communicate messages your organization wants to communicate
  • 19. Can’t get enough? •  The Duck Call blog: bigducknyc.com/blog •  The Duck Pond (monthly email): gimme your card •  Email me: sarah@bigducknyc.com
  • 20.  Maintaining Our Brand Through Communications  Michelle Joyner  Communications Director  National Military Family Association  MJoyner@MilitaryFamily.org
  • 21. The
Need
to
Rebrand
 Compe11on
 •  Large
growth
in
the
number
of
nonprofits
serving
military
 families
and
service
members


 •  Compe11on
for
financial
support
from
corpora1ons,
 founda1ons,
government


 •  Military
families
who
benefit
from
our
efforts
are
unaware
of
 our
work
 New
Scope
of
Work
 •  Confusion
when
defining
the
mission

  • 22. Moving
from
NMFA

  • 23. to
the
Na1onal
Military
Family
 Associa1on 

  • 24. Personality
 •  Resilient
 •  With
gravitas
/
serious
 •  Patrio1c
 •  Hardworking
 •  Honest
 •  Holis1c
 •  Responsive
 •  A
fighter
and
defender
 •  With
Integrity
 •  Comprehensive
 •  Diligent
 •  Grassroots
 •  Trustworthy
 •  Empowering
 •  Credible

  • 25. What
We
Do
 Mission
Statement:

 To
fight
for
benefits
and
programs
that
 strengthen
and
protect
uniformed
services
 families
and
reflect
the
Na1on’s
respect
for
 their
service

  • 26. Who
We
Serve
 Military
families’
media
habits
(2008)

 •  75%
rely
on
the
Internet
and
53%
on
email
for
 news
and
informa1on.

 •  Nearly
9
in
10
report
using
email
‘every
day’
or 
 ‘most
days’

 •  6
in
10
surf
the
Web
‘every
day’
or
‘most
days’
 •  47%
u1lize
text
messaging
on
their
cell
phones

  • 27. Our
Brand
Online

  • 28. www.MilitaryFamily.org
 WEB
TRAFFIC
 2008
 2009
 Unique
Visitors
 


634,600
 



561,500
 Unique
Page
Views
 3,336,565
 6,359,578
 Page
views/visitor
 5.3
 11.3
 ONLINE
DONATIONS
 2008
 2009
 #
of
Dona1ons
 

465
 

695
 Total
$
received
 $ 89,393 $ 147,717 Giis
>$1000
%
total
 

48%
 

46%

  • 29. Electronic
Communica1ons 

  • 30. Electronic
Communica1ons 
 •  The
Voice
for
Military
Families,
bi‐monthly
 newsleler
‐‐
6000
print
copies,
35,000
email
 recipients

 •  Monthly
Bulle1n
‐‐
135,000
email
recipients
 •  Weekly
News
Alert
‐‐
32,000
email
recipients

 •  Monthly
Military
Spouse
Club
eNewsleler
–


 210
military
community
spouse
club
recipients
 

  • 31. Facebook
 •  Launched
May
2009
 •  www.facebook.com/militaryfamily
 •  6,000
fans
 •  +200
new
fans
each
week
 •  +100
Wall
Posts,
Comments,
and
Likes/week
 •  +1,000
page
visits/week

  • 32. BRANDRAISING
 

  • 33. CCS
Vision
&
Mission
 •  Our
Vision
is
of
a
world
where
people
value
cultures
 different
from
their
own,
are
aware
of
global
issues,
and
are
 empowered
to
effect
posi1ve
change.

 •  Our
Mission
is
to
operate
volunteer
programs
around
the
 world
in
partnership
with
sustainable
community
ini1a1ves,
 bringing
people
together
to
work
side‐by‐side
while
sharing
 perspec1ves
and
fostering
cultural
understanding.
We
are
an
 interna1onal
not‐for‐profit
organiza1on
with
no
poli1cal
or
 religious
affilia1ons.


  • 34. CCSValues 
 •  Shared
Humanity

 When
people
of
different
cultures
have
an
opportunity
to
 connect,
there
comes
an
understanding
of
our
shared
 humanity.

 •  Respect

 We
accept,
appreciate
and
respect
that
people
know
and
 understand
what
is
appropriate
for
their
own
communi1es.

 •  Integrity

 We
commit
to
ensuring
the
safety,
flexibility,
professionalism,
 transparency
and
excellence
of
our
programs.


  • 35. 1.
The
“New”
 Brand
Basics
 •  Program‐specific
posi1oning
statements
&
 base
copy
 •  Segmented
target
audiences
for
marke1ng
 planning
 •  Logo
suite
for
different
programs

 •  Program‐specific
websites
more
similar
to
one
 another
than
integrated
with
main
 organiza1onal
iden1ty


  • 36. 2.
Internal
training
&

 rollout
of
sub‐brands
 •  Internal
COM
Plan
&
Training
not

fully
 developed;
lack
of
organiza1onal
 understanding
of
“unique”
brand
promise
 •  Opera1onal
depts
didn’t
have
1me
to
adapt
to
 vision,
including
logo
use
 •  Program‐specific
rollout
not
cost‐efficient
nor
 sustainable
in
opera1ons/marke1ng
 •  Ul1mately,
we
found
ourselves
scaling
back
 sub‐brand‐promise

  • 37. CCS
LOGOS
…THEN
&
NOW
  Now … from Brand Guide
  • 38. 3.
Strategizing
Localized
CommunicaRons– UK

 •  Brand
raising

in
UK
required
very
different
 tac1cs.

Percep1on
of
volunteering
abroad
 highly
evolved,
communica1ons
suite
needed
 more
than
refinement.

 •  UK
volunteers
tended
to
be
within
our
 secondary
target
audience
 •  Templates
&
outreach
campaigns
required
 Bri1sh
spelling
&
phrasing,
and
different
 considera1ons

to
implement
effec1vely.

  • 39. US
vs.
UK
words
(markeRng
copy)
 •  Color

‐
colour

 •  Favorite
‐
favourite
 •  ...ize

‐
...ise

 •  Traveler
‐
traveller
 •  ...nor

‐
...nour

 •  Traveling
‐
travelling
 •  Program

‐
programme

 •  Traveled
‐
travelled
 •  Enroll

‐
enrol

 •  Theater
‐
theatre
 •  Center

‐
centre

 •  Prac1ce
(verb
and
 •  Special1es
‐
speciali1es
 noun)
‐
prac1ce
(noun),
 prac1se
(verb)

  • 40. US
vs.
UK
words
(operaRons
copy)

  • 41. 4.
RevisiRng
CommunicaRons
Suite
for
 New
Website
Launch
(Overhaul)
 •  Simplified
brand
messaging.

 


(e.g.,
Nixed
program‐specific
logo
suite
,
expanded
main
logo
 suite

and
guidelines,
integrated
various
program‐specific
 websites)
 •  Focused
on
organiza1onal
brand
basics
(e.g.,
 photography
standards,
key
messages,
effec1vely
 communica1ng
our
core
program
design)
 •  Streamlined
naviga1on
to
address
cri1cal
 ques1ons
of
volunteers
 •  Integrated
learning
from
SEO
&
SEM,
 iden1fying
cri1cal
landing
pages


  • 42. 5.
Formalizing
an
integrated
social
media
 strategy

  • 43. 6.
IdenRfying
and
Understanding
CCS
 Brand
Advocates
 •  25,000
alumni
in
100
countries
 •  Ins1tu1onal
partners
(i.e.,
Salesforce.com,
universi1es)
 •  Organiza1onal
Donors

 •  Enrolled
volunteers
&
Extended
network
 (parents,
friends,
other
family,
sponsors)
 •  In‐country
staff
in
12
countries
 •  HQ
staff,
including
former
staff
&
interns

  • 44. 7.
IdenRfying
OpportuniRes
to
Engage
 Brand
Advocates
 •  How
can
different
advocates
engage
the
 brand?

What
concerns/policies/protocols
 deter
par1cipa1on?
 •  What
is
theLCD
ask?
What
are
others?
How
do
 we
recognize
(and
reward?)
those
advocates
 differently?
 •  What
will
keep
these
groups
engaged?

 •  What
might
churn
look
like
within
each
 advocate
category?



  • 45. 8.
Not
Taking
our
Brand
for
Granted
 •  Monitoring
brand
via
brand
advocates
&
 consumers.
 •  Monitoring
field,
media
alen1on.
 •  Monitoring
churn.
Un1l
2010,
~10%
of
our
 volunteer
base
annually
were
repeat
 volunteers.

 •  Monitor
how
our
target
market(s)
uniquely
 communicate
and
respond
to
our
messaging.


  • 46. 5
Key
Points
of
Advice

 1.  Invest
in
Technology
 2.  Invest
in
Communica1ons
professionals.

 3.  Invest
in
Internal
Communica1ons.

 4.  Keep
Focus
on
Being
“In‐Brand”
vs.
In‐ agreement.

 5.  Remember
who
your
brand
advocates
are,
 and
their
careabouts.


  • 47. 
 Evalua1on
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120 How
Was
this
Session?
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