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Classification of rpd Classification of rpd Presentation Transcript

  • Classification of partially edentulous arches
    By
    Bibinbhaskaran
    • Introduction
    • Need for classification
    • Requirements of a classification
    • Various classification systems
    • ACP classification
    • ICK classification
    • Conclusion
  • Introduction
    Prime purpose : to enable dentist to clearly communicate to a listener.
    A workable Classification helps to create order from the many number of possible combinations of missing teeth and edentulous spaces.
    An aid in learning of the fundamentals of design
  • Need for classification
    To formulate a good treatment plan.
    To anticipate the difficulties common to occur for that particular design.
    To communicate with a professional about a case.
    To design the denture according to the occlusal load usually expected for a particular group.
  • Requirements of a Classification
    Allow visualization of type of partially edentulous arches that is being considered.
    Allow differentiation between tooth supported and tooth-tissue supported partial dentures.
    Serve as a guide to the type of design to be used.
    Be universally accepted.
  • Various classification systems
    There are many classifications available for classifying edentulous arches. The most common ones are:
    Cummer
    Kennedy’s
    Applegate-Kennedy
    Bailyn
    Neurohr
    Mauk
    Friedman
    Godfrey
    Skinner
    Austin and Lidge
    Craddock
    Wild
    Watt et al
    Costa
    Osborne and Lammie
    Beckett
    Swenson
    ACP classification
    ICK classification
  • Cummer’s classification system
    Proposed By CUMMERIn 1920.
    Cummer stated “ for working purposes all the cases may be made to fall into 4 simple classes, which have as their basis the choice of number and position of the direct retainer”.
  • Class I – DIAGONAL: 2 diagonally opposite teethare chosen as abutment teeth for the attachment of direct retainer
    Class II –DIAMETRIC: 2 diametrically opposite teethare chosen as abutment teeth for the attachment of the direct retainers
  • Class III –UNILATERAL: one or more teeth on the same sideare chosen as abutment teeth for the attachment of the direct retainers
    Class IV –MULTILATERAL: three or more teeth are chosen as abutment teeth for the attachment of the direct retainers. The teeth are disposed in a triangular or quadrilateral relationship
  • Kennedy’s classification:
    Most widely used method of classification
    Proposed in 1923 by Dr. Edward Kennedy of New York.
    It is based on the relationship of the edentulous spaces to the abutment teeth.
  • Class I- Bilateral edentulous areas located posterior to the remaining natural teeth.
    Class II- Unilateral edentulous area located posterior to the remaining natural teeth.
    Class III- Unilateral edentulous area with natural teeth both anterior and posterior to it.
    Class IV- Single, bilateral edentulous area located anterior to the remaining natural teeth.
  • Applegate Kennedy’s system:
    It is a modification of the Kennedy’s system.
    It is based less on the number and location of the remaining teeth and edentulous spaces.
    It takes into consideration the capabilities of the teeth, which bound the spaces to serve as abutments for the prosthesis
  • DR. O.C APPLEGATE (1960) later attempted to expand the kennedy system by adding class V and VI.
    Class V: Edentulous area bounded anteriorly and posteriorly by the natural teeth but in which the anterior abutment (the lateral incisor) is not suitable for the support.
    Class VI: an edentulous situation in which the teeth adjacent to the space are capable of total support of the required prosthesis
  • Applegate’s Rules:
    Applegate also provided the following 8 rules to govern the application of the Kennedy system:
    Rule 1: Classification should follow rather than precede extractions that might alter the original classification.
    Rule 2:
    If the third molar is missing and not to be replaced it is not considered in the classification.
    Rule 3:
    If the third molar is present and is to be used as an abutment, it is considered in the classification.
  • Rule 4:
    If the second molar is missing not to be replaced that is the opposing second molar is also missing and is not considered in the classification.
    Rule 5 –
    The most posterior edentulous area or areas always determines the classification.
    Rule 6 –
    Edentulous areas other than those determining the classification are referred to as the modification spaces and are designated by their number.
  • Rule 7 –
    The extent of the modification is not considered, only the number of additional edentulous areas.
    Rule 8 –
    There can be no modification areas in class IV arches. Because any edentulous area lying posterior to the single bilateral area determines the classification.
  • Bailyn’s system:
    Based on whether the prosthesis is tooth borne, tissue borne or a combination of the two:
    Bailyn divided all R.P.Ds into-
    A: Anterior restorations: saddle area anterior to the 1st bicuspids
    P: Posterior restorations: saddle area posterior to the cuspids.
  • Subdivided as:
    ClassI:Bounded saddle(not more than 3 teeth missing)
    Eg: P.I
    Class II: Free end saddle(no distal abutment)
    Eg: P.II
    ClassIII : Bounded saddle(more than 3 teeth missing)
    Eg P.III
  • Class A.III :
    • Edentulous space anterior to the 1st bicuspid
    • Bounded saddle(more than three teeth missing)
    Class A.I. P.II –
    • Edentulous area anterior to the first bicuspid and not more than 3 teeth missing
    • other edentulous space being posterior to the cuspid with only one tooth available as an abutment.
  • Class P.I. P.II– Both the edentulous spaces are posterior to the cuspids,
    • one with only one tooth for anchorage
    • other with two available teeth separated by a distance of less than three teeth.
  • Neurohr’s classification:
    Proposed in 1939, this classification is also based on the support derived.
    It is not commonly used due to its complexity.
    Many of his denture designs did not match his principles of classification.
  • Class I: TOOTH BEARING
    A unilateral or bilateral case falls into the above classification when there are teeth posterior to all spans, and when there are not more than four teeth missing in any space.
  • There are two possible variation in this class.
    Variation 1 : Missing posteriors predominate
    Posteriors missing, anteriors in place
    Posteriors missing, some anteriors missing
  • Variation 2 : missing anteriors predominate
    • Anteriors missing, posteriors present
    • Anteriors missing, some posteriors missing
  • Class II : TOOTH-AND-TISSUE BEARING
    A unilateral or bilateral case comes under the above classification when there are
    • no teeth posterior to one or more spans
    • more than 4 teeth(which include a canine) in one or more spans.
  • Class II is further subdivided into divisions with variation under each.
    DIVISION 1: When there are no teeth posterior to 1 or more span.
    VARIATION1 : Missing posteriors predominate
    posteriors missing, anteriors in place
    posteriors missing, some anteriors missing
    VARIATION 2 : missing anteriors predominate
    none
    anteriors missing, some posteriors missing
  • DIVISION 2: when there are teeth posterior in all spans, but when there are more than 4 teeth in any one or more spans.
    VARIATION 1 : missing posteriors predominate
    a.none
    b.posteriors missing, some anteriors missing
    VARIATION 2 : missing anteriors predominate
    • anteriors missing, posteriors in place
    • anteriors missing, some posteriors missing
    CLASS III : tissue bearing complete dentures
  • Mauk’s system
    based on number, length and position of the spaces and number and position of the remaining teeth.
    Class I – Bilateral posterior spaces and teeth remaining in a segment in the anterior region.
    Class II – Bilateral posterior spaces and one or more teeth at the posterior end of one space.
  • Class III - Bilateral posterior spaces and one or more teeth at the posterior end of both spaces.
    Class IV – Unilateral posterior space with or without teeth at the posterior end of the space. Opposing arch is unbroken.
  • Class V – It has an anterior space only. Posterior part of the arch is unbroken on either side.
    Class VI – Has irregular spaces around the arch. The missing teeth are single or in groups.
  • WILD’S CLASSIFICATION
    Proposed simple yet self explanatory classification. It is not very well known in English dental literature.
    Class I : Interruption of the dental arch(ieBOUNDED)
    Class II : shortening of the dental arch (ieFREE END)
    Class III : combination of I & II
  • Godfrey’s system (1951)
    Based on the location and the extent of the edentulous spaces .
    Class A – Class A has tooth borne denture bases in the anterior part of the mouth.
    It may be an unbroken 5- tooth space; a broken 5-tooth space; or an unbroken 4-tooth space.
  • Class B –MUCOSA BORNE denture base area in anterior of the mouth.
    Unbroken six tooth space; an unbroken 5-tooth space; a broken 5-tooth space.
    Class C –TOOTH BORNE denture base in the posterior part of the mouth.
    unbroken 3-tooth space; a broken
    3-tooth space; an unbroken 2-tooth space; a broken 2-tooth space.
  • Class D – Class D has mucosa borne denture bases in the posterior part of the mouth.
    It may be an unbroken 4-tooth space or a 3 tooth;
    2 tooth or single tooth space.
  • FRIEDMAN’S CLASSIFICATION
    Introduced ‘ABC’ classification in 1953. According to this classification-
    A: Anterior
    B: Bounded posterior
    C: Cantilever
  • BECKETT AND WILSON CLASSIFICATION
    Beckett (1953) and Wilson(1957) based their ideas on bailyn’s classification(1928).
    Based on proportionate amount of support provided by the teeth and tissues.
  • Class I : BOUNDED SADDLE. Abutment teeth qualified to support the denture.
    Mucosa is not used for support.
    Class II: FREE END
    a. Tooth and tissue borne
    b. Tissue borne
  • Class III : BOUNDED SADDLE. Abutment teeth not so qualified to support the denture as described in class I.
    Wilson in 1957 elaborated the classification as follows:
    • Mandibularkennedy’s class III should be treated as class I
    • Maxillary kennedy’s class III should be treated as class I or III
  • CRADDOCK’S CLASSIFICATION
    In 1954.
    Class I – saddle supported on both sides by substantial abutment teeth.
    Class II – vertical biting forces applied to denture resisted entirely by soft tissue.
    Class III– tooth supported at only 1 end of the saddle.
     
  • AUSTIN AND LIDGE CLASSIFICATION
    In 1957.
    Describes the position of teeth.
    Class A: missing anteriors.
    A1 : Missing anteriors on one side.
    A2 : Missing anteriors on both sides.
    A B1: Missing anteriors with bilateral. construction.
  • Class P: Missing posteriors
    P1 – Missing posteriors on one side.
    P2 – Missing posteriors on both sides.
    P B1 : Posterior missing on both sides(distal extension).
  • ClassAP: missing anteriors and posteriors.
    AP1 – missing anteriors and posteriors on one side.
    AP2 – missing anteriors and posteriors on both sides.
  • SKINNER’S SYSTEM:(1957)
    This system was based on the relationship of the abutment teeth to the supporting residual alveolar ridge.
    He said that the value of RPD is directly related to quantity and the degree of support, which it receives, from the abutment teeth and residual ridge.
  • Class I – Abutment teeth are located both anterior and posterior to the denture bases, spaces may be unilateral or bilateral.
    Class II –All teeth areposterior to the denture base, which function as partial denture unit. It may be unilateral or bilateral.
  • Class III – All the abutment teeth are anterior to denture base which functions as partial denture base and may occur unilaterally or bilaterally.
    Class IV – Denture bases are located both anterior and posterior to the remaining teeth. They may be unilateral or bilateral.
    Class V – Abutment teeth are unilateral in relation to denture base and may be unilateral or bilateral.
  • SWENSON’S CLASSIFICATION 
    The 4 primary classes represent only slight modification of the Kennedy’s system.
    Class I – Its an arch with one free end denture base
  • Class II – It is an arch with 2 free end denture base.
    Class III – It is an arch with edentulous space posteriorly on one or both the sides but with teeth present anteriorly or posteriorly to each space.
    Class IV – It is an arch with anteriorly edentulous space and with 5 or more anterior teeth missing.
  • Subdivision – the 4 more major classes are subdivided without denoting which tooth is missing.
    • A: ANTERIOR
    • P: POSTERIOR
    • AP: ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR
    Class II A – It is basic class II with an anterior space.
    Class IV P – Basic class IV with posterior space.
  • TERKLA AND LANEY MODIFICATION (1963):
    Combined kennedy’s and swenson’s classification
    Kennedy’s class II = swenson’s class I
    Kennedy’s Class I = Swenson’s Class II
  • WATT ET AL CLASSIFICATION
    Proposed the classification in 1958. It was based on the type of support derived.
    ENTIRELY TOOTH BORNE: Entire denture rests on the abutment teeth.
  • ENTIRELY TISSUE BORNE: Entire denture rests on soft tissue.
    PARTIALLY TOOTH BORNE AND PARTIALLY TISSUE BORNE: These dentures rest on both teeth and the tissues.
  • OSBORNE AND LAMMIE’S CLASSIFICATION
    Proposed in 1974. It is similar to Watt et al’s classification.
    Class I : MUCOSA BORNE
    Class II : TOOTH BORNE
    Class III : combination of MUCOSA –BORNE AND TOOTH BORNE.
  • COSTA’S CLASSIFICATION
    This system developed in 1974 was based on describing rather than classifying partially dentulous arches.
    • Anterior: Edentulous space located in the anterior part of dental arch.
    • Lateral: Edentulous space bounded both mesially and distally by remaining teeth.
    • Terminal : Edentulous space not bounded distally by remaining teeth.
  • THANK YOU!!
  • Prosthodontic diagnostic index
    The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) has developed a classification system for partial edentulism based on diagnostic findings.
    J Prosthodont 2002;11:181-193.
  • This partially edentulous classification system offers the following potential benefits:
    Improved intra-operator consistency.
    Improved professional communication.
    An objective method for patient screening in dental education.
    Standardized criteria for outcome assessment and research.
    Improved diagnostic consistency .
    Simplified, organized aid in the decision to refer a patient.
  • Classification System for the Partially Edentulous Patient
    DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA
    Location and extent of the edentulous area(s)
    Condition of the abutment teeth
    Occlusal scheme
    Residual ridge
  • Criteria 1 Location and extent of edentulous area(s)
  • Ideal or Minimally Compromised Edentulous Area
    • The edentulous span is confined to a single arch and one of the following:
    • Any anterior maxillary span that does not exceed 2 missing incisors
    • Any anterior mandibular span that does not exceed 4 missing incisors
    • Any posterior maxillary or mandibular span that does not exceed 2 premolars or 1 premolar and 1 molar
  • Moderately Compromised Edentulous Area
    The edentulous span is in both arches and one of the following:
    • Any anterior maxillary span that does not exceed 2 missing incisors
    • Any anterior mandibular span that does not exceed 4 missing incisors
    • Any posterior maxillary or mandibular span that does not exceed 2 premolars or 1 premolar and 1 molar
    • The maxillary or mandibular canine is missing
  • Substantially Compromised Edentulous Area
    Any posterior maxillary or mandibular span that is greater than 3 missing teeth or 2 molars.
    Any edentulous span including anterior and posterior areas of 3 or more missing teeth.
  • Severely Compromised Edentulous Area
    Any edentulous area or combination of edentulous areas requiring a high level of patient compliance.
  • Criteria 2Abutment Teeth Condition
  • Ideal or Minimally Compromised Abutment Teeth Condition
    No preprosthetic therapy is indicated.
  • Moderately Compromised Abutment Teeth Condition
    Abutment Condition:Insufficient tooth structure to retain or support intracoronal restorations – in one or two sextants .
    Abutments require localized adjunctive therapy, i.e., periodontal, endodontic or orthodontic procedures in one or two sextants.
  • Substantially Compromised Abutment Teeth Condition
    Abutment condition:Insufficient tooth structure to retain or support intracoronal or extracoronal restorations- four or more sextants .
    Abutments require extensive adjunctive therapy, i.e., periodontal, endodontic or orthodontic procedures- in four or more sextants.
  • Severely Compromised Abutment Teeth Condition
    Abutments have a guarded prognosis
  • Criteria 3Occlusal Scheme
  • Ideal or Minimally Compromised Occlusal Scheme
    No preprosthetic therapy required.
    Class I molar and jaw relationships.
  • Moderately Compromised Occlusal Scheme
    • Occlusal scheme requires localized adjunctive therapy (e.g. enameloplasty on premature occlusal contacts).
    • Class I molar and jaw relationships.
  • Substantially Compromised Occlusal Scheme
    Entire occlusal scheme requires reestablishment but without any change in the vertical dimension of occlusion.
    Class II molar and jaw relationships.
  • Severely Compromised Occlusal Scheme
    Entire occlusal scheme requires reestablishment with changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion.
    Class II Division 2 and Class III molar and jaw relationships.
  • Criteria 4Residual Ridge
  • The criteria published for the Classification System for Complete Edentulism are used to categorize any edentulous span present in the partially edentulous patient.
  • Classification System for Partial Edentulism
  • Class I—Criteria 1Location and extent of edentulous area(s)
    Ideal or minimally compromised.
    Edentulous areas are confined to a single arch.
    It does not compromise the physiologic support of the abutment.
    Includes any anterior maxillary span that does not exceed two incisors, any anterior mandibular span that does not exceed four missing incisors and any posterior span that does not exceed two premolars or one premolar and a molar.
  • Class I—Criteria 2Abutment condition
    Abutment teeth condition is ideal or minimally compromised.
    No need for preprosthetictherapy.
  • Class I—Criteria 3Occlusal Scheme
    Occlusal scheme is ideal or minimally compromised.
    No need for preprosthetictherapy.
    Maxillomandibular relationship: Class I molar and jaw relationships.
  • Class I—Criteria 4Residual ridge
    Residual ridge morphology is the Class I complete edentulismdescription.
  • Class II
  • Class II—Criteria 1Location and extent of edentulous area(s)
    Moderately compromised
    Edentulous areas are confined to a single arch
    It does not compromise the physiologic support of the abutment teeth
    Includes:
    • any anterior maxillary span not exceeding two incisors
    • any anterior mandibular span not exceeding four missing incisors
    • any posterior span that does not exceed two premolars or one premolar and a molar or any missing canine (maxillary or mandibular
  • Class II—Criteria 2Abutment condition
    Abutment teeth condition is moderately compromised .
    Abutments in one or two sextants have insufficient tooth structure to retain or support intracoronal or extracoronal restorations .
    Abutments in one or two sextants require localized adjunctive therapy.
  • Class II—Criteria 3Occlusal Scheme
    Occlusal scheme is moderately compromised.
    Occlusal scheme requires localized adjunctive therapy.
    Maxillomandibular relationship:Class I molar and jaw relationships.
  • Class II—Criteria 4Residual ridge
    Residual ridge morphology is the Class I complete edentulismdescription.
  • Class III
  • Class III—Criteria 1Location and extent of edentulous area(s)
    Substantially compromised.
    Edentulous areas may be in one or both arches.
    It does compromise the physiologic support of the abutment teeth.
  • Class III—Criteria 2Abutment condition
    Abutment teeth condition is substantially compromised .
    Abutments in three sextants have insufficient tooth structure to retain or support intracoronal or extracoronal restorations
    Abutments in three sextants require more substantial localized adjunctive therapy, i.e., periodontal, endodontic, or orthodontic procedures.
    Abutments have a fair prognosis.
  • Class III—Criteria 3Occlusal Scheme
    Occlusal scheme is substantially compromised
    Requires reestablishment of the entire occlusal scheme without any change in the vertical dimension of occlusion
    Maxillomandibular relationship: Class II molar and jaw relationships
  • Class III—Criteria 4Residual ridge
    Residual ridge morphology is the Class I complete edentulismdescription.
  • Class IV
  • Class IV—Criteria 1Location and extent of edentulous area
    Severely compromised
    It can be extensive and in multiple areas in opposing arches
    It does compromise the physiologic support of the abutment teeth to create a guarded prognosis
    It includes acquired or congenital maxillofacial defects
    At least one edentulous area has a guarded prognosis
  • Class IV—Criteria 2Abutment condition
    Abutment teeth condition is severely compromised .
    Abutments in four or more sextants have insufficient tooth structure to retain or support intracoronal or extracoronal restorations .
    Abutments in four or more sextants require extensive localized adjunctive therapy, i.e., periodontal, endodontic, or orthodontic procedures.
    Abutments have guarded prognosis.
  • Class IV—Criteria 3Occlusal Scheme
    Occlusal scheme is severely compromised.
    Requires reestablishment of the entire occlusal scheme including changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion.
    Maxillomandibular relationship: Class II Division 2 and Class III molar and jaw relationships.
  • Class IV—Criteria 4Residual ridge
    Residual ridge morphology is the Class I complete edentulismdescription.
  • Class IV—AdditionalCriteria
    Refractory patient (a patient who has chronic complaints following appropriate therapy). These patients continue to have difficulty in achieving their treatment expectations despite the thoroughness or frequency of the treatment provided.
    Severe manifestations of local or systemic disease including sequelae from oncologic treatment.
    Maxillo-mandibulardyskinesia and/or ataxia.
  • Guidelines for the Use of the Classification System for Partial Edentulism
  • The following additional guidelines will assist in the consistent application of the classification:
    Consideration of future treatment procedures must not influence the decision as to which diagnostic level to place the patient in.
    Initial preprosthetic treatment and/or adjunctive therapy can change the initial classification level. The classification may need to be reassessed after the removal of existing prostheses.
  • Esthetic concerns or challenges raise the classification in complexity by one level in Class I and II patients.
    Periodontal health is intimately related to the diagnosis and prognosis for partially edentulous patients. For the purpose of this system, it is assumed that patients will receive periodontal therapy to achieve and maintain periodontal health so that prosthodontic care can be accomplished.
  • In the situation where the patient presents with an edentulous maxilla opposing a partially edentulous mandible, each arch is diagnosed with the appropriate classification system.In this situation, the maxilla would be classified according to the complete edentulism classification system and the mandible according to the partial edentulism classification system.
  • A single exception to this rule is when the patient presents with an edentulous mandible opposed by a partially edentulous or dentate maxilla. This clinical situation presents significant complexity and long-term morbidity and as such, should be diagnosed as a Class IV in either system.
  • ICK classification system
    ICK classification system will follow the Kennedy method with the following guidelines:
    No edentulous space will be included in the classification if it will be restored with an implant supported fixed prosthesis.
  • ICK classification system
    2. To avoid confusion, maxillary arch is drawn as half circle facing up and mandibular arch as as half circle facing down. The drawing will appear as if looking directly at the patient; right and left quadrants are reversed.
  • The implant classification will always begin with the phrase “Implant Corrected Kennedy (class)” followed by the description of the classification. It can be abbreviated as follows:
    ICK I, for Kennedy class I situations
    ICK II , for Kennedy class II situations
    ICK III , for Kennedy class III situations and
    ICK IV , for Kennedy class IV situations.
    • The abbreviation “max” for maxillary and “man” for mandibular can precede the classification. The word modification can be abbreviated as “mod”.
    • ICK I mod 2(#18, 22, 26, 31)
    • Roman numerals will be used for the classification, and Arabic numerals will be used for the number of modification spaces and implants.
    • The tooth number using the American dental Association (ADA) system is used to give the number and exact position of the implant in the arch.
  • The classification of any situation will be according to the following order: main classification first, then followed by the number of modification spaces, followed by the number of implants in parentheses according to their position in the arch preceded by the number sign(#).eg;
    ICK I mod 2(#18, 22, 26, 31)
     
    The classification can be used either after implant placement to describe any situation of RPD with implants, or before implant placement to indicate the number and position of future implants with an RPD.
  • A different name , ICK classification system is given to this system to be differentiated from other partially edentulous arch classification systems.
    The arrangement of implants will be from right to left in the maxillary arch and from left to right in the mandibular arch following the tooth numbering system.
     
     
    ICK I (#2,15 ) ICK I (# 18,22, 31)
  • Conclusion
    If a single universally acceptable system of classification of partially dentulous arch could be taught and used. It would open avenues of communication throughout dentistry, which is not presently available.
    If any one system were to be accepted for wide professional use, it would either favour Kennedy or Applegate – Kennedy system or the recent ACP classification.
  • REFERENCES
    • Miller E.L. Systems for classifying partially dentulous arches. J Prosthet Dent 1970;24(1):25-40.
    • Costa E. A simplified system for identifying partially edentulous dental arches. J Prosthet Dent 1974;32(6):639-645.
    • Stewart KL, Rudd KD, Kuebker WA. Clinical removable partial prosthodontics. 2nd edition.
    • Carr AB, McGivney GP, Brown DT. McCracken’s removable partial prosthodontics. 11th edition.
    • Brudvik JS. Advanced removable partial dentures. Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc; Illinois. 1999
  • THANK YOU!!