Week 8, Chapter 7
Management and Leadership
Agenda
Chapter 7
Exercise
Review
Learning Objectives
The management function:
responding to change
Four functions of management
(PDOC):
• Planning – achiev...
Learning Objectives
The organizing function
of management and
the three categories of
skills needed by
managers.
The diffe...
Managers’ Roles Are Evolving - New Approaches: Why?
Global Competition
Business Scandals
Constant Change
Better Educated W...
Managers must practise the art of getting things done
through organizational resources.
Image sources: http://www.flickr.c...
Management: The process used to accomplish organizational goals
through: PDOC
Planning
Directing (Leading)
Organizing
Cont...
Planning: A management function that includes anticipating trends
and determining the best strategies and tactics to achie...
Directing (Leading) - Creating a vision for the
organization and guiding, training,
coaching, and motivating others to
wor...
Organizing - A management
function that includes
designing the structure of
the organization and
creating conditions
and s...
Controlling - Involves establishing clear standards to determine
whether an organization is progressing toward its goal an...
PDOC – see Figure 7.1
Planning: Create Vision
A vision is more than a
goal; it’s an
encompassing
explanation of why the
organization exists and
...
A mission statement is an outline of the organization’s
fundamental purposes.
Seneca College Mission Statement
To contribute to Canadian
Society by being a
transformational leader in
providing student...
Goal(s) are the broad, long-term accomplishments an
organization wishes to attain – usually expressed in terms of
measurab...
Objectives are specific, short-term statements detailing
how to achieve the organization’s goals.
Plans are the ordered sequences of strategies
an organization uses to achieve each objective. – plans always
have a time e...
A large part of creating measurable objectives (by which you will
achieve your corporate ―goal‖) is to understand what you...
SWOT Analysis – evaluation technique to analyze an organization
and its environment by identifying…
Strengths Weaknesses
O...
Seneca SWOT Analysis
Strengths Weaknesses
Opportunities Threats
Questions of Planning
What is the
situation now?
Where do we
want to go?
How can we get
there from here?
"Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?'
'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' sa...
Forms of Planning – see Figure 7.4
Strategic Planning
• Setting of broad, long-range
goals by top managers
Tactical Planni...
Strategic planning outlines how the company will meet its
objectives and goals.
It provides the
foundation for
the policie...
Tactical planning is the process of developing detailed, short-
term statements about what is to be done, who is to do it,...
Operational planning is the process of setting work standards and
schedules necessary to implement the company’s objective...
Contingency Planning (or ―What If‖?)
Identify in advance
changes that might
occur
Identify ways the
company can
respond to...
Contingency planning is the process of preparing alternative
courses of action that may be used if the primary plans don’t...
Crisis planning involves reacting to sudden changes in the
environment.
Image source: http://apimages.ap.org
can be especi...
Problem solving is the process of solving the everyday problems
that occur.
It is less formal than the decision-making
pro...
Decision Making: Process
Define Describe
Develop
Alternatives
Develop
Agreement
DecideDo
Determine
Problem solving technique - brainstorming (i.e.,
coming up with as many solutions as possible in a short period of
time wi...
Problem solving techniques: PMI
Solution
Pluses
(+)
Minuses
(-)
Interesting
Organizing – see Figure 7.5
Organizing – see Figure 7.6
Management Planning - Levels and Time SpansTime
Top
Management
2 Years +
Middle
Management
1 Year,
Quarter
Lower Level
Man...
Management Skills
• the ability to do specialized
tasks such as keyboarding,
artwork, accounting,
marketing etc.
Technical...
Required Management Skills – see Figure 7.7
40
Homework
Stakeholders
surrounding
communities
environmental
groups
suppliers
employees
customers
dealers
Stakeholders
The consensus seems to be that smaller organizations
are more responsive than larger organizations.
Therefore...
In business literature there is a trend toward separating the notion
of management from that of leadership.
One person mig...
Good leaders motivate workers and create the
environment for workers to motivate themselves.
Management is the carrying ou...
Leaders are motivated by
intrinsic as opposed to extrinsicvalues:
Values, Needs,
Desires, Motive
and Will power
Rewards an...
Autocratic Leadership Style: Close Supervision
Such a style is effective in
emergencies and
when absolute
―followership‖ i...
Participative (Democratic)
Leadership Style
Employee
participation in
decisions may not
always increase
effectiveness,
but...
Free-rein Leadership Style
In certain
organizations, where
managers deal
with doctors,
engineers, or other
professionals,
...
Managing Knowledge
Finding the right
information, keeping the information
in a readily
accessible place, and
making the in...
Sources of Management Information
Outside Sources
• Customers & Suppliers
• Financial Institutions
• Other Managers
• Publ...
Controlling
Controlling consists of five steps:
• Establishing clear performance
standards.
• Monitoring and recording act...
Controlling – see Figure 7.10
Chapter Summary
The management function:
responding to change
Four functions of management
•Planning – achieving organizat...
Bus106 wk8 ch7 Management and Leadership
Bus106 wk8 ch7 Management and Leadership
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BUS106 Management and Leadership - from UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN BUSINESS, 7th Canadian Edition (custom publication for Seneca) ; published by McGraw-Hill

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Bus106 wk8 ch7 Management and Leadership

  1. 1. Week 8, Chapter 7 Management and Leadership
  2. 2. Agenda Chapter 7 Exercise Review
  3. 3. Learning Objectives The management function: responding to change Four functions of management (PDOC): • Planning – achieving organizational goals • Directing (leading) – different from managing • Organizing for success • Controlling – the five steps The different types of planning and the importance of decision making
  4. 4. Learning Objectives The organizing function of management and the three categories of skills needed by managers. The differences between leaders and managers, and the various leadership styles. The five steps of the control function of management.
  5. 5. Managers’ Roles Are Evolving - New Approaches: Why? Global Competition Business Scandals Constant Change Better Educated Workers Downsizing/Rightsizing Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/teamtraveller/
  6. 6. Managers must practise the art of getting things done through organizational resources. Image sources: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bendavid/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/divemasterking2000/; http://www.flickr.com/photos/blatantworld/
  7. 7. Management: The process used to accomplish organizational goals through: PDOC Planning Directing (Leading) Organizing Controlling
  8. 8. Planning: A management function that includes anticipating trends and determining the best strategies and tactics to achieve organizational GOPST: Goals, Objectives, Plans, Strategies and Tactics. Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ehoba/
  9. 9. Directing (Leading) - Creating a vision for the organization and guiding, training, coaching, and motivating others to work effectively to achieve the organization’s goal and objectives.
  10. 10. Organizing - A management function that includes designing the structure of the organization and creating conditions and systems in which everyone and everything works together to achieve the organization’s goals and objectives. Determining how to use existing resources to implement the plan Jobs must be arranged in a structure to create an efficient task system
  11. 11. Controlling - Involves establishing clear standards to determine whether an organization is progressing toward its goal and objectives rewarding people for doing a good job taking corrective action if they are not
  12. 12. PDOC – see Figure 7.1
  13. 13. Planning: Create Vision A vision is more than a goal; it’s an encompassing explanation of why the organization exists and where it’s trying to head. A vision gives the organization a sense of purpose. Values are a set of fundamental beliefs that guide a business in the decisions they make.
  14. 14. A mission statement is an outline of the organization’s fundamental purposes.
  15. 15. Seneca College Mission Statement To contribute to Canadian Society by being a transformational leader in providing students with career-related education and training Source: http://www.senecac.on.ca/ori/elearning/downloads/StrategicPlan2004-2009.pdf
  16. 16. Goal(s) are the broad, long-term accomplishments an organization wishes to attain – usually expressed in terms of measurable objectives.
  17. 17. Objectives are specific, short-term statements detailing how to achieve the organization’s goals.
  18. 18. Plans are the ordered sequences of strategies an organization uses to achieve each objective. – plans always have a time element.
  19. 19. A large part of creating measurable objectives (by which you will achieve your corporate ―goal‖) is to understand what you are good at and what you are not good at. What are your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats? Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeanlouis_zimmermann/
  20. 20. SWOT Analysis – evaluation technique to analyze an organization and its environment by identifying… Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats internal external internal external
  21. 21. Seneca SWOT Analysis Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
  22. 22. Questions of Planning What is the situation now? Where do we want to go? How can we get there from here?
  23. 23. "Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. `I don't much care where...' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat." Lewis Carrol (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland). Source: http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj36/lucidogene/Alice_in_Wonderland_2000.jpg
  24. 24. Forms of Planning – see Figure 7.4 Strategic Planning • Setting of broad, long-range goals by top managers Tactical Planning • Identification of specific, short-range objectives by lower managers Operational Planning • Setting of work standards and schedules Contingency Planning • Backup plans in case primary plans fail
  25. 25. Strategic planning outlines how the company will meet its objectives and goals. It provides the foundation for the policies, procedures, and strategies for obtaining and using resources to achieve those goals
  26. 26. Tactical planning is the process of developing detailed, short- term statements about what is to be done, who is to do it, and how it is to be done.
  27. 27. Operational planning is the process of setting work standards and schedules necessary to implement the company’s objectives. Focuses on the specific responsibilities of supervisors, department managers, and individual employees.
  28. 28. Contingency Planning (or ―What If‖?) Identify in advance changes that might occur Identify ways the company can respond to changes Image source: http://apimages.ap.org
  29. 29. Contingency planning is the process of preparing alternative courses of action that may be used if the primary plans don’t achieve the organization’s objectives. The economic and competitive environments change so rapidly that it’s wise to have alternative plans of action.
  30. 30. Crisis planning involves reacting to sudden changes in the environment. Image source: http://apimages.ap.org can be especially challenging to medium- sized and smaller companies due to fewer resources
  31. 31. Problem solving is the process of solving the everyday problems that occur. It is less formal than the decision-making process and usually calls for quicker action.
  32. 32. Decision Making: Process Define Describe Develop Alternatives Develop Agreement DecideDo Determine
  33. 33. Problem solving technique - brainstorming (i.e., coming up with as many solutions as possible in a short period of time with no censoring of ideas)
  34. 34. Problem solving techniques: PMI Solution Pluses (+) Minuses (-) Interesting
  35. 35. Organizing – see Figure 7.5
  36. 36. Organizing – see Figure 7.6
  37. 37. Management Planning - Levels and Time SpansTime Top Management 2 Years + Middle Management 1 Year, Quarter Lower Level Management Days, Weeks
  38. 38. Management Skills • the ability to do specialized tasks such as keyboarding, artwork, accounting, marketing etc. Technical • “people skills” that enable managers to understand and get along with others Human Relations • the ability to view problems creatively and abstractly, and to accurately analyze situations Conceptual Image source: http://apimages.ap.org
  39. 39. Required Management Skills – see Figure 7.7
  40. 40. 40 Homework
  41. 41. Stakeholders surrounding communities environmental groups suppliers employees customers dealers
  42. 42. Stakeholders The consensus seems to be that smaller organizations are more responsive than larger organizations. Therefore, many large firms are being restructured into smaller, more customer-focused units.
  43. 43. In business literature there is a trend toward separating the notion of management from that of leadership. One person might be a good manager but not a good leader. Another might be a good leader without being a good manager.
  44. 44. Good leaders motivate workers and create the environment for workers to motivate themselves. Management is the carrying out of the leadership’s vision.
  45. 45. Leaders are motivated by intrinsic as opposed to extrinsicvalues: Values, Needs, Desires, Motive and Will power Rewards and Recognition
  46. 46. Autocratic Leadership Style: Close Supervision Such a style is effective in emergencies and when absolute ―followership‖ is needed— for example, when fighting fires. Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ldandersen/
  47. 47. Participative (Democratic) Leadership Style Employee participation in decisions may not always increase effectiveness, but it usually increases job satisfaction. Image courtesy of Brown Man Clothing Company http://www.brownmanclothing.com/
  48. 48. Free-rein Leadership Style In certain organizations, where managers deal with doctors, engineers, or other professionals, often the most successful leadership style is free-rein.
  49. 49. Managing Knowledge Finding the right information, keeping the information in a readily accessible place, and making the information known to everyone in the firm.
  50. 50. Sources of Management Information Outside Sources • Customers & Suppliers • Financial Institutions • Other Managers • Publications, Conferences • Academics & Consultants Inside Sources • Subordinates & Teams • Superiors • Meetings and Seminsars • Management Information Systems • Grapevine
  51. 51. Controlling Controlling consists of five steps: • Establishing clear performance standards. • Monitoring and recording actual performance • Comparing results against plans and standards. • Communicating results and deviations to the employees involved. • Taking corrective action when needed and providing positive feedback.
  52. 52. Controlling – see Figure 7.10
  53. 53. Chapter Summary The management function: responding to change Four functions of management •Planning – achieving organizational goals •Directing (leading) – different from managing •Organizing for success •Controlling – five steps The different types of planning and the importance of decision making. The organizing function of management and the three categories of skills needed by managers. The differences between leaders and managers, and the various leadership styles. The five steps of the control function of management.

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