Daft aise chp14_final
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Daft aise chp14_final

on

  • 1,157 views

novel

novel

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,157
Views on SlideShare
1,157
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
36
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Daft aise chp14_final Daft aise chp14_final Presentation Transcript

  • 0 Chapter 14 Communicating in Organizations© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-1
  • 0Learning Objectives1. Explain why communication is essential for effective management and describe how nonverbal behavior and listening affect communication among people.2. Explain how managers use communication to persuade and influence others.3. Describe the concept of channel richness, and explain how communication channels influence the quality of communication.4. Explain the difference between formal and informal organizational communications and the importance of each for organization management.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-2
  • 0Learning Objectives (contd.)1. Identify how structure influences team communication outcomes.2. Explain why open communication, dialogue, and feedback are essential approaches to communication in a turbulent environment.3. Identify the skills managers need for communicating during a crisis situation.4. Describe barriers to organizational communication, and suggest ways to avoid or overcome them.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-3
  • 0 Ex. 14.1 The Manager as Information Nerve Center External Internal Information InformationSource: Adapted from HenryMintzberg, The Nature OfManagerial Work(New Manager as MonitorYork:Harper & Row, 1973),72.  Information processor c k  Communicator ba Fe d ed ee ba F ck Manager as Disseminator Manager as Spokesperson  Distributes Distributes information to information to subordinates © 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. people outside the organization 14-4
  • 0What is Communication? Can be defined as the process by which information is exchanged and understood by two or more people, usually with the intent to motivate or influence behavior.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-5
  • 0Ex. 14.2 A Model of the Communication Process© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-6
  • 0Ex. 14.3 The Pyramid of Channel Richness© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-7
  • 0Capacity of Information ChannelInfluences The ability to handle multiple cues simultaneously. The ability to facilitate rapid, two-way feedback. The ability to establish a personal focus for the communication.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-8
  • 0Nonverbal Communication  Messages sent through human actions and behavior rather than through words.  Most nonverbal communication is unconscious or subconscious.  Occurs mostly face-to-face.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-9
  • 0 Ex. 14.4 Ten Keys to Effective ListeningSOURCE: Adapted from Sherman K. Okum, “How to Be a Better Listener,” Nation’s Business (August 1975), 62 and Philip Morgan and Kent Baker, “Building a Professional Image; ImprovingListening Behavior,” Supervisory Management (November 1985), 34-38. © 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-10
  • 0Ex. 14.5 Downward, Upward, and Horizontal Communication inOrganizations SOURCE: Adopted from Richard L. Daft and Richard M. Steers, Organizations; A Micro-Macro Approach, 538 Copyright 1986 by Scott, Foresman and Company, Used by permission.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-11
  • 0Downward Communication  Messages sent from top management down to subordinates.  Most familiar and obvious flow of formal communication.  Major problem is drop off.  Another concern, distortion.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-12
  • 0Upward Communication  Messages that flow from the lower to the higher levels in the organizations.  Upward communications mechanisms: 1. Suggestion boxes. 2. Employee surveys. 3. MIS reports. 4. Face to face conversations.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-13
  • 0Horizontal Communication Lateral or diagonal exchange of messages among peers or coworkers. Horizontal communication’s three categories: 1. Intradepartmental problem solving. 2. Interdepartmental coordination. 3. Change initiatives and improvements.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-14
  • 0The Grapevine  Will always exist in organizations.  Used to fill in information gaps.  Tends to be more active during periods of change.  About 80% of topics are business related.  About 70-90% of details of grapevine are accurate.© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-15
  • 0 Dialogue andEx. 14.8Discussion: The ConversationDifferences Lack of understanding, disagreement, divergent points of view Dialogue Discussion Reveal feelings State positions Explore assumptions Advocate convictions Suspend convictions Convince others Build common ground Build oppositions Results Results Long-term, innovative solutions Short-term resolution Unified group Agreement by logic Shared meaning Opposition beaten down Mind- Transformed mind-sets sets held onto© 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-16
  • 0Ex. 14.9 Communication Barriers & Ways to Overcome Them Barriers How to Overcome Individual Interpersonal dynamics Active listening Channels and media Selection of appropriate channel Defense mechanisms Question underlying assumptions Semantics Knowledge of other’s perspective Inconsistent cues MBWA Organizational Status and power differences Climate of trust, dialogue Departmental needs and goals Development and use of formal channels Lack of formal channels Encouragement of multiple channels, formal and informal Communication network unsuited Changing organization or group structure to to task fit communication needs Poor coordination Feedback and learning © 2006 by South-Western, a division of Thomson Learning. All rights reserved. 14-17