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2011 Global Customer Experience Management Survey

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What is Your Competition Doing? Are You an Industry Customer Experience Leader? Join Beyond Philosophy to See the Results of the 2011 Global Customer Experience Management Survey …

What is Your Competition Doing? Are You an Industry Customer Experience Leader? Join Beyond Philosophy to See the Results of the 2011 Global Customer Experience Management Survey
• Current insights on customer experience from experts and CxOs from across the globe
• Analysis of 8,000 customer experience leaders

Program
Join Steven Walden, Beyond Philosophy's Senior Head of Research, and Colin Shaw, Founder and CEO, as they reveal the results of the 2011 Global Customer Experience Management Survey. The research will pull back the curtain on where the industry stands today, answering questions such as:
• Which industries and regions spend the most on customer experience?
• What are the drivers and challenges the customer experience industry faces as it further develops?
• What companies have seen the biggest customer experience growth, by industry?
• Where is customer experience management most needed? What industry? What country? What companies?

In addition, they discuss topics such as:
• What industries will see the greatest growth in customer experience over the next several years?
• What will be the next great customer experience advancement?
• What is the valuable element of a company's customer experience program? How does it differ by industry or region?
• How will social media affect the way companies approach customer experience?

Learning Objectives
• Learn about the Beyond Philosophy 7-stage Customer Experience Maturity model.
• Discover which industries and countries are concentrating on enhancing the customer experience.
• Learn how to overcome common problems that get in the way of successful customer experiences.
• Explore the pace of growth and the state of customer experience development, broken down by geographic regions.

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  • 1. Global Customer ExperienceManagement Survey 2011Beyond PhilosophySteven Walden, Senior Head of ResearchColin Shaw, Founder & CEO www.beyondphilosophy.com
  • 2. Webinar Interface Review 1. Viewer Window 2. Control Panel GoToWebinar Example InterfaceBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 2
  • 3. The Beyond Philosophy Perspective Customer Experience Thought leadership is New fourth book is all we do! our differentiator Is now available Offices in London, Atlanta with partners in Links with academia Focus on the emotional side Europe & Asia of Customer ExperienceBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 3
  • 4. We are Proud to Have Helped Some Great OrganizationsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 4
  • 5. Themes Methodology 1 How can we model the state of the market in Customer 2 Experience globally? How are global resources allocated to Customer 3 Experience? The risks, challenges and drivers to Customer 4 Experience programmes Best Practice: what you need to do! 5Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 5
  • 6. Questions 1. Learn about our 7-stage Customer Experience Maturity model. Also, gain insight into how customer experience is How can we model the understood or misunderstood, and learn about the state of growth in implications and risks as it continues to evolve. Customer Experience Globally? 2. Where is customer experience management most needed? What industry? What country? What companies? 3. Which industries spend the most on customer experience? 4. Which regions spend the most on customer experience? How are global resources 5. What companies have seen the biggest customer allocated to Customer experience growth, by industry? Experience? 6. What industries will see the greatest growth in customer experience over the next several years? 7. What are the drivers and challenges the customer experience industry faces as it further develops? 8. What is the valuable element of a company’s customer The risks, challenges and experience program? How does it differ by industry or drivers to Customer region? Experience programmes 9. How will social media affect the way companies approach customer experience? 10. What will be the next great customer experience Best Practice: what you advancement?: Best Practice and Innovations need to do!Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 6
  • 7. Section 1 Methodology 1Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 7
  • 8. Quantitative Analysis • 8,000 Customer Experience Executives • Over 2,106 companies • Covering 239 countries and regions • Sourced from social media, Google, SEC filings, LinkedIn, Beyond Philosophy database of 20,000 contacts; company websites, news reports, conference speaking, blog articlesBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 8
  • 9. A High Bar to Minimize the Inclusion of Weakly Active Firms or Those Not Really Doing CE  We selected CE ‘active’ companies e.g., those with a CE presence on an in-country Google site ‘in the last year’ and/ or a presence of executives with a LinkedIn CE title.Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 9
  • 10. Global Study: 53 In-Depth Interviews with CE ProfessionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 10
  • 11. A Cross-Section of Experts and Industries Region % Experts , 19% Banking, 19% Western Europe 27% Oil, 2% North America 19% Healthcare, 2% Logistics, 2% Eastern Europe/ 10% Insurance, 10% Charity, 2% Russia Construction, 2% Middle East 10% Utilities, 2% Car, 6% Telco, 21% South America 6% Retail, 6% Africa 6% Manufacturing, India 6% 6% Outsourcing, 2% South-East Asia 6% Australasia 6%  CxO 47% Caribbean 2%  Lead PM 23%  CE Experts 30%Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 11
  • 12. Section 2 How can we model the state of the market in Customer 2 Experience globally?Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 12
  • 13. Modeling the State of the World for Customer Experience  We developed the CE Maturity Index to answer this question CE Maturity Index Quantitatively Derived 1. Concentration of CE active companies 2. Existence of key CE players 3. Industry presence i.e., in or beyond key verticals 4. Country Google presence 5. Size of businesses interested 6. General market conditions 7. Competitive intensity Qualitatively Derived 1. Value derived i.e., CSAT or loyalty focused 2. Awareness of the term 3. Understanding of the term 4. Strategic or tactical use 5. Origination of termBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 13
  • 14. 7 Stage Maturity Model • 7 stages of maturity Source: 2,106 companies, and 53 CE • Customer Experience is a global professionals phenomena • Mid-low countries are key to growthBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 14
  • 15. Dynamics Behind the Index: Movements are Seen Best Practice & Innovation Acquisition Relationship Retention Focused on acquiring Focused on relationship Focused on retaining customers Economics customers building with customers and preventing churn Stages Mid-low maturity Mid-high maturity High maturity Key metrics Sales Satisfaction and Sales Loyalty Peru Turkey USA Example Nigeria UAE UK China countries South Africa Singapore India Russia Canada Brazil 1. Blue Ocean 2. Use to differentiate a market entrant - 1. Target high margin 1. Optimise channels deregulation segments 2. Manage retention 3. Leapfrog a technology 2. Manage a changed programmes Key drivers 4. HQ directive expectations set 3. Launch branded 5. Software vendor push 3. HQ directive programmes 6. Government regulation 4. Technology 4. Regulation 7. Internationalization – see programmes rebranded and be like developed markets (social media) 1. No CE dept or very 1. Established key CE players 1. Start up CE dept. in limited: marketing 2. Start up CE going beyond Internal owned or defined by certain verticals Telco, Banking and Retail customer service 1. Banking Example 1. Motor 2. Telecommunications 1. B2B -Logistics Changes in 2. B2B - Manufacturing 2. Aviation 3. Retail 3. Utilities 4. IT High Mature 5. InsuranceBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 15
  • 16. Dynamics Behind the Index: Movements are Seen Best Practice & Innovation Acquisition Relationship Retention Focused on acquiring Focused on relationship Focused on retaining customers Economics customers building with customers and preventing churn Stages Mid-low maturity Mid-high maturity High maturity Key metrics Sales Satisfaction and Sales Loyalty Peru Turkey USA Example Nigeria UAE UK China countries South Africa Singapore India Russia Canada Brazil 1. Blue Ocean 1. Target high margin 2. Use to differentiate a segments market entrant - 2. Manage a changed 1. Optimise channels deregulation expectations set 2. Manage retention 3. Leapfrog a technology 3. HQ directive programmes Key drivers 4. HQ directive 4. Technology 3. Launch branded 5. Software vendor push programmes rebranded programmes 6. Government regulation 6. Internationalization – 4. Regulation 7. Internationalization – see see and be like and be like developed developed markets markets (social media) (social media) 1. No CE dept or very 1. Established key CE players 1. Start up CE dept. in limited: marketing 2. Start up CE going beyond Internal owned or defined by certain verticals Telco, Banking and Retail customer service Example 1. Motor 1. Banking 1. B2B -Logistics Changes in 2. B2B - Manufacturing 2. Aviation 2. Telecommunications 3. Utilities 3. Retail High MatureBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 16
  • 17. Dynamics Behind the Index: Movements are Seen Best Practice & Innovation Acquisition Relationship Retention Focused on acquiring Focused on relationship Focused on retaining customers Economics customers building with customers and preventing churn Stages Mid-low maturity Mid-high maturity High maturity Key metrics Sales Satisfaction and Sales Loyalty Peru USA Turkey Example Nigeria UK UAE China Singapore countries South Africa India Canada Russia Brazil Netherlands 1. Blue Ocean 1. Target high margin 1. Optimise channels 2. Use to differentiate a segments 2. Manage retention market entrant - 2. Manage a changed programmes deregulation expectations set 3. Launch branded 3. Leapfrog a technology 3. HQ directive programmes Key drivers 4. HQ directive 4. Technology 4. Regulation 5. Software vendor push programmes rebranded 5. Spread of CE into other 6. Government regulation 6. Internationalization – non-core (big 4) verticals 7. Internationalization – see see and be like (see below) – increasing and be like developed developed markets customer consciousness markets (social media) (social media) 1. No CE dept or very 1. Established key CE players 1. Start up CE dept. in limited: marketing 2. Start up CE going beyond Internal owned or defined by certain verticals Telco, Banking and Retail customer service 1. Banking Example 1. Motor 2. Telecommunications 1. B2B -Logistics Changes in 2. B2B - Manufacturing 2. Aviation 3. Retail 3. Utilities 4. IT High Mature 5. InsuranceBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 17
  • 18. Dynamics Behind the Index: Movements are Seen Best Practice & Innovation Acquisition Relationship Retention Focused on acquiring Focused on relationship Focused on retaining customers Economics customers building with customers and preventing churn Stages Mid-low maturity Mid-high maturity High maturity Key metrics Sales Satisfaction and Sales Loyalty Peru Moving USA Turkey Example Nigeria UK UAE China Singapore countries South Africa India Canada Russia Brazil Netherlands 1. Blue Ocean 1. Target high margin 1. Optimise channels 2. Use to differentiate a segments 2. Manage retention market entrant - 2. Manage a changed programmes deregulation expectations set 3. Launch branded 3. Leapfrog a technology 3. HQ directive programmes Key drivers 4. HQ directive 4. Technology 4. Regulation 5. Software vendor push programmes rebranded 5. Spread of CE into other 6. Government regulation 6. Internationalization – non-core (big 4) verticals 7. Internationalization – see see and be like (see below) – increasing and be like developed developed markets customer consciousness markets (social media) (social media) 1. No CE dept or very 1. Established key CE players 1. Start up CE dept. in limited: marketing 2. Start up CE going beyond Internal owned or defined by certain verticals Telco, Banking and Retail customer service 1. Banking Example Moving 1. Motor 2. Telecommunications 1. B2B -Logistics Changes in 2. B2B - Manufacturing 2. Aviation 3. Retail 3. Utilities 4. IT High Mature 5. InsuranceBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 18
  • 19. Overall Company Growth Rates – Still Increasing In Spite of Recession Possibilities in the ‘West’ Maturity Increase Maintain Decrease Range est. High-Maturity 65% 35% 0% Slight 0-15% All Other 79% 18% 2% Moderate 0-30% Total 73.5% 24.5% 2% 15% Source: 53 CE professionals Certain niche industries will continue to grow e.g., motor and aviation. There is also a strong push within retail, especially with rising expectations in the Mid Mature countries to ‘experience’ western brands and a higher standard required from the burgeoning ‘upper middle class’ for luxury e.g., UAE, India and China. Motor is a key vertical here.Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 19
  • 20. The Themes How are global resources allocated to Customer 3 Experience?Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 20
  • 21. Which Regions Allocate Most Resources on Customer Experience? • The regions with the highest resource allocation on CE are North America (USA and Canada) and the UK • Growing interest in Brazil, China, South Source: 2,106 companies, and 53 CE Africa, Singapore and New Zealand. professionals • A surprisingly strong impact in India and Australia • 21Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com
  • 22. Which Regions Allocate Most Resources on Customer Experience? • In low active countries, often pushed as a corporate mission or the language of software vendors Source: 2,106 companies, and 53 CE professionals • Growing interest countries are starred – this includes UAE, Australia/ New Zealand due to ‘awareness’ factorBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 22
  • 23. Which Industries Allocate Most Resources on Customer Experience? Sector No. Active CE % of total 1. 63 percent in 4 companies (N= 2,106) verticals: Telecoms, 1 Telecoms 441 21% Banking, Retail, IT and Banking 414 20% services 2 3 Retail 291 14% 2. Large scale investment IT and 174 8% in CE noted in Airlines 4 (Delta and Boeing) Services Insurance 96 5% 3. Innovation/ technology Airlines 67 3% driver for some is key Motor 67 3% Software 65 3% Utilities 60 3% Logistics 51 2% Source: 2,106 companies, and 53 CE professionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 23
  • 24. Where is the concentration of resources? Is it just about the Big 4 in each country? Countries Total Big 4 Telecom Banking Retail IT / (2,106) vertical Services % 1. Regional growth is driven by the USA 506 55% 68 87 100 22 Big 4 verticals UK 276 43% 31 26 46 17 2. In mature USA Canada 165 61% 20 31 40 9 and UK there is India diversification: 109 71% 18 11 20 28 Australia 106 56% 14 23 9 13  Insurance China  Software 34 71% 2 11 5 6  Utilities France 34 62% 5 7 4 5  Motor New Zealand 29 69% 5 8 3 4 Netherlands 28 61% 6 4 2 5 Brazil 27 78% 8 4 6 3 Singapore 27 70% 4 8 3 4 Source: 2,106 companies, and 53 CE professionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 24
  • 25. What Companies Have Seen the Biggest Customer Experience Resource Allocation, by Industry? Top 20 These companies are not IT necessarily the best, they 1. HP Bank claim most activity in CE 2. HSBC Telecom 3. Vodafone Retail 4. GAP 5. AMEX 6. Dell 7. Citibank 8. Best Buy 9. Sprint Nextel 10. AT&T 11. TD Bank 12. Bank of America 13. All State Insurance 14. Wells Fargo 15. BT 16. BSkyB 17. Lloyds Bank Criteria: location, spread 18. Telstra and number of country 19. Verizon locations, number of CEdisclosure- the identified Executives are by executives give direction of focus and are for cross- 20. T-Mobile executives comparison purposes Source: 2,106 companies, and CE expertsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 25
  • 26. What do they do? HP and HSBC HP: “TCE is the HP Enterprise Business HSBC: “Implemented a multi-faceted CEM focus on our customer’s experience at every solution, including customer listening posts contact with us, our products and in HSBC net, event driven surveys within the services. We work to have the most satisfied banking platform and opportunities for future and loyal customers in the industry and we enhancements” would like to share some of the ways we do that and hear your thoughts and ideas.” “A simplified ownership experience” Customer Experience intelligence from an annual survey of 72,000 global business “Make products work better together” customers “Bring the customer into the heart of our Development of targeted strategies decision-making” 20% rise in NPS “ Looking for competitive pricing and low cost of ownership”Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2009 www.beyondphilosophy.com 26
  • 27. CE Professionals Most Admired Companies (Does Not Mean Most Resources Allocated) Rank Company • Most admired the ‘usual suspects’ 1 Apple E-retail strong i.e., Apple and 2 Amazon.com Amazon E-retailers 3 Zappos • Some e-retail 4 Starbucks success, being able to give a 5 Disney human touch to an 6 Tesco impersonal channel 7 Virgin Atlantic 8 Vodafone 9 Nordstrom • This does not 10 First Direct translate to having most ‘resources’ Source: 53 CE professionals thrown at CEBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 27
  • 28. The Themes The risks, challenges and drivers to Customer 4 Experience programmesBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 28
  • 29. Risk 1: Limitations in its Adoption: rule of 1/3rds Example “Most work in the USA today is in the top 100 banks (in the US there are 4,500 banks). One third are trying to do something so CE is a core strategy e.g., TD Bank. Umpqua, Huntingdon; one third are dabbling in the Also an middle - CE measurement. Opportunity! Now with the change in financial regulation and margin pressure, momentum has been built.” (Banking, USA, Expert)Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 29
  • 30. Risk 2: Use of the Term to Rebadge Current Operations “Australia not strong in CE development, in Australia, culturally they are between the USA and the UK so they are “Lipstick on a pig” always looking to do the same things but that does not mean they do it; they get the title but still do standard marketing things.” (Australia, Expert) “There is major confusion between customer service (i.e., bounded by customer service “The other one is confusion with departments) so CE= CS. user experience so things about (Expert, UK) web, user interface, design. Techies think user experience, business professionals think customer service - here it becomes, survey tools, workforce automation, all stuff related to the contact center use (as they worry about CSAT).” (Expert, UK)Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 30
  • 31. Risk 3: Misappropriation of the Term for Vendor Sales “There is a lot of CRM being rebranded to CEM. Lots of vendors are doing this and lots of buyers are thinking it. (Expert, UK) Company Claim Fact Bhutan “Enable Bhutan to have an end-to-end Customer Contact Center Telecom Customer Experience Management Solution with help-desk approach” support and management Saudi “Provide a great level of satisfaction Contact Center Telecom given their vast experience in managing Management Customer Experience across multiple geographies”Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 31
  • 32. Risk 4: Failure to Take Account of the Customer’s Emotional Viewpoint, e.g., in ROI Measurement % Measurement %  Over 50% of an NPS Verbatims experience is about 15% 6% emotion. CSAT Focus groups  Emotions drive 15% 4% behaviour. Don’t measure Emotion curves 15% 2%  Customer General qualitative TRIM index Experience is about 11% 2% using Emotions to Cannot measure Crisis moments differentiate. 9% 2% Journey maps Customer 8% immersion If you are not thinking 2% Sentiment analysis about Emotions you 8% Call recovery are not doing your job scripts 2% and not standing out from your competitors Measurement % While 88 percent of Quantitative interviewees accepted the 32% importance of emotion to Qualitative customer experience, few 43% Can’t do or don’t do knew what to do about it! 25% Source: 53 CE professionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 32
  • 33. Risk 5: Length of Time Required to Execute “The change occurred over a 6-7 year time period. Driven by the Chairman” (Motor, UK, CxO) “Sprint is currently in a 3-4 year turnaround period. It takes 5 years to go from awful to ok then another 5 years from good to great – the problem is companies are usually hit by a recession in that time and Are you fit for purpose over the scrap it, short-termism does them in.” (Expert, UK) long run or just adding more functionality?Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 33
  • 34. Challenge: Get the Definition Right! Definition % “It is quite a defensive definition.” Touchpoint 60% (Expert, UK) Customer research 28% Emotional 18%  Where is Experience in Company mindset 18% terms of being memorable and emotional, something Company process 10% you would want to pay money for? Brand 8% Loyalty 8% Relationship 6% Value-add 4% Customer service 2% Source: 53 CE ProfessionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 34
  • 35. This Means Get Enlightened First Generation Second Generation Telecoms E-Tail Innovation Banking Healthcare Regulation Retail Utilities Regulation Insurance Logistics Economic IT and Services Manufacturing Economic Hotel and Government Regulation Hospitality Pharma Economic Software Construction Economic Consumer Goods Charity Economic Motor Aviation New to Enlightenment (lower base, higher growth, newly Seeking innovated) Enlightenment (at least some) Source: 2,106 companies and 53 CE professionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 35
  • 36. Challenge: Get The Internal Mindset Right Challenges % Operational priorities override (inc. acquisition focus, cost cutting agenda, legacy sales metrics) 16%  Internal Mindset problems– Culture (mindset of organization) is it a priority or not? 14% Lack of understanding of CE 12% Lack of leadership 11% Uncertainty on how to implement 10% Need to demonstrate ROI 9% Complexity of management challenge (inc. IT, multi-channel) 9% Customers not used to it 5% Recruitment difficulties 4% Lack of industry adoption 4% Difficulties of embedding in value chain 2% Regulations 2% Source: 53 CE professionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 36
  • 37. Challenge: Get People Engaged with CE Origin of CE VP and Director % Origin of CE VP and Director % With CE Background 22% Strategy 1% Without CE Background 78% Web 1% Operations/ process 23% Purchasing 1% Customer service 22% IT 1% Sales 7% HR 1% Brand 4% Retention 4% 1. 78% of CE directors and VPs (N=136) have no background in CEM Marketing 4% 2. 45% of leaders have a background in Research 4% operations or customer service Finance 4% Source: LinkedIn sample of 136Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 37
  • 38. Challenge: Ensure You Are Investing in the Right Projects Projects undertaken Total Now IT/Software 19%  Just a rebrand? Training  Helping software sales? 13% Customer research 10% Customer service 8% Measurement 8% Process improvement (multi-channel) 7% Culture 6% Brand 6% Governance 5% Touchpoint mapping 5% Strategic review 4% HR and recruitment 3% Marketing campaigns 3% Social media 2% Modelling and analytics 3% Source: 53 CE ProfessionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 38
  • 39. Challenge: Respond to the Drivers Driver % Differentiate under commoditization pressure 24% Improve loyalty, retention, prevent churn 19%  The rise of Customer Respond to customer empowerment 19% Empowerment means you Drive through a branded experience have to do CE 10% Target and create new segments 8% Practitioners push 5% Regulation 4% Control costs by being more efficient 4% Customer management (multi-channels) 2% Vision of one person 2% Silver bullet 1% Ethical 1% Source: 53 CE professionalsBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 39
  • 40. Customer Empowerment 10 customer empowerment drivers: 1. Social media 2. The development of the ‘fast society’ – ultra competitive markets (added value CE is a barrier to entry as well as a differentiator) 3. The burgeoning middle classes in countries such as India have raised service expectations. 4. The development of a high-value consumer segment in countries such as UAE and China has raised demand for luxury experiences 5. Customer demand for international brands has encouraged the expansion of western firms into new markets and the development of the ‘branded experience.’ 6. Deregulation has opened up demand from third, fourth or fifth market players to differentiate through CE e.g., in Telecommunications, UK Banking 7. With increased travel, customers are becoming more demanding 8. Government regulation 9. Cultural sensitivity – service to experience (India, Middle East); hospitality focused centers 10. Web aggregator sites (e.g., trip advisor et al. sharing views continuously)Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 40
  • 41. Internationalization of Leadership and Customers Through ContactBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 41
  • 42. What Will be the Next Great Customer Experience Advancement? WHAT YOU NEED TO DOBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 42
  • 43. Aim to Become Customer Conscious Customer Experience is an “Organizationally Conscious” effort to orchestrate every action that 1. The growth in CE impacts the customer. This programs goes beyond customer depends on the service, it looks at making memorable and long-lasting Conscious level to which an organization has experiences for customers through all activity. developed a (Banking, Nigeria, CxO) ‘conscious’ concern for the customer. 2. Some industries will remain strong in awareness, others will be Unconscious forced to awareness (e.g., via regulation, customer empowerment)Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 43
  • 44. Undertake an Organizational Roadmap Approach Monitor and review Embedding the CE culture Process improvement Training, what it means, leadership engagement IT infrastructure, call center infrastructure Engage the Organisation Redesign experiences Training, governance, CE Council or organisational support for Process design, pilot new designs (do something!) design Setting the strategy Where is the organisation (audit), emotion research, strategy roadmap & ROI, Understanding CE What is CE! leadership buy-in, get the emotional difference 44Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 44
  • 45. Undertake an Organizational Roadmap Approach Monitor and review Embedding the CE culture Process improvement Training, what it means, leadership engagement IT infrastructure, call center infrastructure Engage the Organisation Redesign experiences Training, governance, CE Council or organisational support for Process design, pilot new designs (do something!) design Without an Setting the strategy alignment to Where is the organisation (audit), emotion research, strategy roadmap & ROI, emotional engagement your are not doing CE Understanding CE What is CE! leadership buy-in, get the emotional difference 45Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 45
  • 46. Undertake an Organizational Roadmap Approach Monitor and review Embedding the CE culture Process improvement Training, what it means, leadership engagement IT infrastructure, call center infrastructure Engage the Organisation Redesign experiences Training, governance, CE Council or organisational support for Process design, pilot new designs (do something!) design Without a Setting the strategy supporting Where is the organisation (audit), emotion research, strategy roadmap & ROI, leadership and culture CE is non- transformational Understanding CE What is CE! leadership buy-in, get the emotional difference 46Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 46
  • 47. Undertake an Organizational Roadmap Approach Monitor and review Embedding the CE culture Process improvement Training, what it means, leadership engagement IT infrastructure, call center infrastructure Engage the Organisation Redesign experiences Training, governance, CE Council or organisational support for Process design, pilot new designs (do something!) design Without a Setting the strategy demonstration of Where is the organisation (audit), emotion research, strategy roadmap & ROI, return, CE as a strategy will be short-term Understanding CE What is CE! leadership buy-in, get the emotional difference 47Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 47
  • 48. Ensure You Become Fit for Purpose – Maintain Long-Term CE From retain to redesign around customers Emotions Inside More Control Better control • Mindset stays the same • Changed mindset • Become less customer focused • More customer focused • See the number • See the change • You can’t change the weight of a • CE as an Organising principle for pig by continually weighing it maintaining CE in the long-termBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 48
  • 49. 7 Strategic Questions 1. What is the Customer Experience you are trying to deliver? 2. What are the emotions you are trying to evoke? 3. What is your subconscious experience telling Customers? 4. Is your Customer Experience deliberate? 5. What do your Customers really want? 6. What provides you with the most value? 7. How Customer centric is your organisation?Beyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 49
  • 50. Thank You We invite you to continue the conversation. Steven Walden US Office: +1 770 206 5280 Senior Head of Research and Consulting UK Office: +44 (0) 207 917 1717 Beyond Philosophy Email: steven.walden@beyondphilosophy.com @Steven_Walden http://www.linkedin.com/pub/steven-walden/2/ba5/1ba Colin Shaw CEO and Founder Beyond Philosophy Email: colin.shaw@beyondphilosophy.com @ColinShaw_CX http://www.linkedin.com/in/colinrjshawBeyond Philosophy © All rights reserved. 2001-2011 www.beyondphilosophy.com 50

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