Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Women and entrepreneurship in Africa
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Women and entrepreneurship in Africa

1,099

Published on

Women and entrepreneurship in Africa -The Case of CAABWA …

Women and entrepreneurship in Africa -The Case of CAABWA

Lecture at UTSC, March 2nd

Published in: Education, Business, Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,099
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Canadian and African Business Women’s Alliance, CAABWACreating strategic partnershipsand programs to support Africanwomen entrepreneurs ininternational trade
  • 2. 2012 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE University of Toronto, Scarborough February 4th , 2012 Workshop Lead Beverley Rodrigues, Consultant, CAABWA Presenters Beverley Rodrigues Belen S. Mulugeta, ABW Connected, Project Coordinator@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 3. The Canadian and African Business WHO Women’s Alliance (CAABWA) is a WE Canadian non-profit organization with the mandate to support African women ARE entrepreneurs in their efforts to participate in international trade.@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 4. WE ACHIEVE OUR OBJECTIVES By building an African womens network through strategic alliances with womens business organizations in sub-Saharan African countries. By facilitating access to training and resource information to support export capacity building. By providing internships for young Canadian women interested in working with womens business organizations in Africa. By fostering business linkages between Canada and African countries. By pursuing donor agency / private funded projects which will fulfill our mandate. @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 5. CANADA AF R ICA WHERE WE WORK@ BEVOR CONSULT ING AND T RAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 6. SERVICE PHILOSOPHY WE ARE COMMITTED TO WORK  Respecting the diverse skills, experiences and backgrounds of all with integrity  Integrating the best gender equality practices  Within an anti-racism framework  Meeting standards of superior quality  With a client centered approach@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 7. In Africa On-going Internship Program • Programs are designed to strengthen women’s trade organizations and businesses in Africa. • Provides Training opportunities and work experience for Canadian students in development.  32 internships jointly managed by CAABWA and Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME), funded by CIDA (2008)  Sponsorship and partnership with the University of Toronto  Sponsorship and partnership with York University  Sponsorship and partnership with Trade Facilitation Office of Canada OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d)@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 8. OUR PROGRAMS/PROJECTS In CanadaCurrent and on-going Partnership Development - York Region and GTA funded by Ontario Trillium Foundation Program development - Self Employment Training and Mentoring for Immigrant Women  Mobile workshops for women in business  Business Start-up information and training  Trade facilitation at festivals and marketplaces OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d)@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 9. OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d) In Canada Past  Business Training and Mentorship for newcomer women (2008-2010) – Funded by Ontario Trillium Foundation  Echoes of Africa Festival (2009) – Funded by Ontario Trillium http://www.caabwa.com/node/32 OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d)@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 10. OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d) International ON-GOING ABW CONNECTED PROGRAM (2010-2013) Our objective is to enhance economic performance on the African continent in the three largest export sectors for women: craft/textiles, agribusiness, services. ABW intends to unite these already successful African business women from ALL 54 countries in Africa to each other. OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d)@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 11. InternationalPast  INTERNSHIP PROGRAM funded by TFOC, CIDA and CMA  POSITIVE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM  ACCESS PROGRAMFunded by the Government of Canada under the Canada Fund for Africa.Conducted Research and compiled baseline information on the trade and genderspecific situation in the selected African countries, on priority needs in terms ofsupport to women exporters for the Program Building Capacity for Trade (PACT) OUR PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS (cont’d) @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 12.  Federation of National Association of Women in OUR Business in Eastern and Southern Africa NETWORK (FEMCOM)  (INTERNATIONAL) Center for African Women Economic Empowerment (CAWEE)  The International Alliance for Women (TIAW)  Centre de services au dévelopment international des affaires (CEDIAF)  Gone Rural Bomake OUR NETWORK (con’t)@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 13.  Immigrant Women in Business in the GTA OUR  Volunteers in developmentNETWORK  Vaughan Welcome CentreCANADA BASED  Somali Immigrant Women’s Association  Community MicroSkills Development Centre  Afghan Women’s Organisation  Women’s Creative Craft International  University of Toronto  York University  Trade Facilitation Office (TFO) @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 14. DEVELOPING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS AND PROGRAMSVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 15. THE COMMON GROUND  Shared Vision - supporting women’s enterprise in Africa  Equal ownership and shared responsibility – maintaining a relationship even when there are no active programs on the ground  Working together, cooperatively – open to change , sharing ideas  Working together flexibly – keeping discussions open  Sharing and learning – communicating plans and experiences relating to partner and other projects  Reviewing the partnership – reviewing work at agreed times  Developing a sustainability plan@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 16. WORKING  ACCESS! A regional program for African Businesswomen in International Trade TOGETHER  Baseline study - Ethiopia, Ghana, South THE ACCESS! Africa, Tanzania and Uganda PROGRAM  Data collection – 82 SMEs with 89% women owned WORKING TOGETHER@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 17. WORKING TOGETHER African womenTHE ACCESS PROGRAM entrepreneurs in international trade ITC/TFOC ImplementingCAABWA conducts Implementing partnerresearch on trade and partner CAAWEE SIDOgender specific priorityneeds to support womenentrepreneurs in Africa CAABWA Internship Program@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 18. SOME FINDINGS ACCESS! BASELINE STUDY@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 19. SOME FINDINGS ACCESS! BASELINE STUDY  African women are more than capable of being successful global entrepreneurs  Women tend to work with women. They choose them as employees, suppliers and clients.  Increasingly, businesswomen are using the Internet for email and to access business information.  The businesswomen surveyed were well-educated with 63% having completed some form of post- secondary education.@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 20. THE STEPS WITH DEVELOPMENT PARTNER, CAWEE AND THE ACCESS PROGRAM (AN EXAMPLE) Step 1 – CAABWA conducts baseline study for ACCESS program Step 2 – CAWEE embarks on ACCESS Program Step 3 – CAABWA and CAWEE discuss needs Step 4 – Needs and solutions highlighted Step 5 – Agreed work plan for interns Step 6 – Exit strategy agreed on Step 7 – 5 CAABWA interns placed with CAWEE for 3-6 months placement Step 8 – Learning shared Step 9 – CAABWA and CAWEE continue to work flexibly@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 21. OUTCOMES OF THE ACCESS PROGRAM The ACCESS! Program was very instrumental in:  Building institutional capacities like – CAWEE ,SIDO, TWCC and capacities of other Stakeholders/Partners  Developing national human resource, in training trainers in international trade  Developing company capacities in international trade, with a very special focus designed to women exporters  The Regional programs were good grounds for experience sharing ,networking and exposures  Web portal www.womenexporters.com Source: Nigest Haile, Founder and Director, CAWEE ACCESS!@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 22. OTHER  Design Africa PROGRAMS  Positive Partnerships AND PARTNERSHIPS & Gone Rural Bomake  ABW Connected@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 23. AN INTERN’S EXPERIENCE IN PARTNERSHIP DESIGN AFRICA@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 24. GHANA 2007 - 2008 Aid to Artisans Ghana (ATAG) Ghana Export Promotion Council (GEPC)@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 25. INTERNSHIP OBJECTIVES Internship Development Objectives: consistent with CIDA’s mandate and priorities by contributing directly to private sector development in Ghana Design Africa – development platform through design ACCESS! - regional technical assistance programme includes 3 main components - training, mentoring and a web portal Intern’s objective: make contribution to Sustainable Development, working to implement the assessment of and trade training activities for African businesswomen Objective of the internship: Develop of skills in the area of project management, association management, event management, market development, web development and training@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 26.  multi country African initiative which has garnered worldwide recognition as an innovative global brand showcasing Africa’s best talent in the craft, textile & furniture sectors. Design Africa’s mission is twofold:  help today’s distinctive African design emerge  accelerate the economic development of the communities and countries involved through the positive impact of exports. @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 27. ATMEK & ECO YARNSBob Denis, Master weaver ATMEK (Left) Monica Odonkor, Distributor, Eco Yarns (Right) Jimmy, Master weaver ATMEK THE PROCESS @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 28. TEKURA(Left) Cheik Diallo, Architect and Designer Kafui, Master CarverJosephine & Kweku, Desiners and owners of TEKURA THE PROCESS @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 29. KPANDO POTTERY Nii Noi, Designer/Owner, Kpando Pottery THE PROCESS@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 30. ABSOLUTE FURNISHINGS(Left) Reggie, Master Carpenter, (Middle) Angela, ABSOLUTE FurnishingsOwner(Right) Cheick Diallo, Architect/ Designer and *Design Africa Consultant THE PROCESS@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 31. DESIGN AFRICA STUDENT MENTORSHIP PROGRAMSherifatu Abas , and David Agyekum Bimpong- Both BA’s in Integrated Rural Arts and Industry at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). THE PROCESS @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 32. REPORTS@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 33. REPORTS@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 34. Cheik Kathleen Belen THE PHOTOSHOOT@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 35. ATMEK &ABSOLUTE FURNISHINGS KPANDO POTTERY TEKURA ECO YARNS THE PRODUCT SHOTS @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 36. MODIFIED NEWLY ESTABLISHE NEWLY CREATED D CREATED BRANDING@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 37. MARKETING COLLATERAL@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING BROCHURE INSERTS SERVICES 2012
  • 38. MARKETING COLLATERAL@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING BROCHURE INSERTS SERVICES 2012
  • 39. IT ALL FINALLY COMES TOGETHER DESIGN AFRICA UNITED AT@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2O12 SIDIM IN MONTREAL
  • 40. IT ALL FINALLY COMES TOGETHER DESIGN AFRICA UNITED AT@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012 SIDIM
  • 41. @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 42. ABW CONNECTED THE CAABWA/CAWEE PARTNERSHIP WORKING TOGETHER@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 43. Shared vision Research the Programmingcommon Working together, Program Delivery ground cooperatively Post Program Activities ABW CONNECTED Developing a sustainability plan WORKING TOGETHER – ABW CONNECTED THE CAABWA/CAWEE PARTNERSHIP @ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 44.  Increased capacity of African womenBENEFITS TO organizations to work with local women in AFRICAN business training; direct links with government and decision makers WOMEN  Increased capacity of African women ENTRE- entrepreneurs through leadership initiatives PRENEURS  Sharing of best practices  Sustainable employment and income generation for women suppliers to women led SMEs in Africa  African women entrepreneurs could benefit from this initiative  Increase regional and international trade@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 45. VOICES OF AFRICAN WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS AND LEADERS  A video of work done by Gone Rural http://www.designafrica.ca/video_en.html  Stevens , founder of wisdomexchangetv.com interviews Katherine Ichoya, Excecutive Director, FEMCOM (a COMESA institution) http://www.wisdomexchangetv.com/katherine-ichoya/EVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 46. Case Study 1 African Business Women (ABW) Connected is an innovative, pioneering initiative to enhance the economic performance of women-led businesses throughout Africa. It is the first initiative of its kind to unite and connect leading African business women from all 54 countries in Africa in the three largest export sectors for women: agribusiness, services and craft/textiles. CAABWA has partnered with Ignite Excellence to create a platform where African women leaders are heard.  How do you think African women entrepreneurs could benefit from this initiative  Is this form of media effective in development?@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 47. Case Study 2 "Social enterprises are businesses operated by non-profits with the dual purpose of generating income by selling a product or service in the marketplace and creating a social, environmental or cultural value. ..Source: ttp://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/about_social_enterprise/definitions Some organizations have partnered with businesses to support them in market expansion. “Ten thousand Villages” is an example of one type of social enterprise. Do you think that CAABWA could develop a social enterprise model to support African women entrepreneurs to expand their markets in North America? What are some pros to such an initiative? What are the likely cons ? Would you consider social enterprise of this nature effective development action?@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 48. QUESTIONS AND FEEDBACK@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012
  • 49. Thank You Presentation Design by Belen S. Mulugeta@ BEVOR CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES 2012

×