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Strategic foresight and museum engagement. bev dywan
 

Strategic foresight and museum engagement. bev dywan

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Using trends in strategic foresight analysis, potential or actual museum engagement strategies for visitor engagement

Using trends in strategic foresight analysis, potential or actual museum engagement strategies for visitor engagement

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  • the creative tension of new technological and sociocultural realities exerts pressure on museums to ensure that the value of its traditional roles of collecting, research and information dissemination are examined, and re-worked. Museums must now co-exist with open source realities of social media, competitive offers from informal educational formats, and a new economy that is both less flush and more in demand for philanthropy. Moving to where the audience is, both figuratively and physically, with all of the obligations of this movement, will require confidence, risk and analysis.
  • This talk will consider how museums can stay relevant through adopting new forms of engagement, to take them into the future by being responsive and nimble. It will look at recent strategies used by museums and other institutions as examples of the new benefits that can be providedFirst, a joke:Sherlock Holmes & Watson go to a Geology Museum.They walk around for a while when Watson notices that there is a rock that doesn't have a display name."What kind of rock is that?" he asked Sherlock."Sedimentary, my dear Watson!”
  • Sfi: new thinking skills to positively impact society, enhance business success and manage organizational change, this innovative program was launched in 2009 to address these issues and opportunities. Emphasis is placed on teaching complex problem finding, framing and solving, to envision and develop sustainable futures.interdisciplinary, co-creative approach only possible at an art and design university, the entrepreneur, social scientist, artist, designer, and engineer will develop together the skills required for leading innovation. Our program prepares graduates to think holistically - exploring, challenging and finding meaning in order to reframe and guide both present and future actions.
  • How many of what roles are here?Your interest in engagement?
  • Sfi: new thinking skills to positively impact society, enhance business success and manage organizational change, this innovative program was launched in 2009 to address these issues and opportunities. Emphasis is placed on teaching complex problem finding, framing and solving, to envision and develop sustainable futures.
  • Sfi: interdisciplinary, co-creative approach only possible at an art and design university, the entrepreneur, social scientist, artist, designer, and engineer together develop the skills required for leading innovation. Our program prepares graduates to think holistically - exploring, challenging and finding meaning in order to reframe and guide both present and future actions.
  • Bluetooth stickers- coin-sized discs directly onto an object and then track them through an app. The app basically turns your smartphone into a radar Other features include the ability to choose different tasks for different locations. Music can be automatically turned on for one area while a navigation app may be started when sitting down at the wheel of a car. The app can even change the user’s ringtone when you get home, or check into Facebook depending on what location is accessed by the user.http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sticknfind-bluetooth-powered-ultra-small-location-stickers?website_name=sticknfindwanteds to raise $70k, raised $931,970Stick-N-Find is working with a museum that's interested in putting stickers on its exhibits, so they can issue tablets or other devices to visitors that can sense the proximity of exhibits, and say "Hello, this is the statue of so-and-so," Buchheim says.It could even end up as a technology for the blind — one that tells them where their belongings are, he says.Meant to be for finding things or reminding…but what if we made the program into a translation of a label…or a video… or a contextual photo….or.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nf4p_-IFzIMAR- can add animations inside real environments, visualised through your phone - it's a way to enhance the experience without taking away from actually being there in real life.  That is a great point for museums - finding a balance between distracting the user from reality with enhancing it through technology.London Science museum- uses fun app and celebrity combinedIn the Science Museum’s brand new augmented reality app ‘Science Stories’, the renowned TV presenter and science enthusiast picks out his personal favourites from the exhibits in the Making the Modern World gallery and lets you know why he thinks they’ve earned their place in history.The app features James as your own personal iphone avatar for 9 world-class exhibits in the gallery. Hear him explain stories and facts about the Puffing Billy, Model T Ford, Rolls Royce Merlin engine and other iconic objects, then test your knowledge with a quiz about what you’ve learned.You can use the app at the Museum, or download for use at home. Download and print the trigger device and bring science to life in your own front room!
  • Translation apps-Penpower Technology, World dictionary, WordLenshttp://questvisual.com/us/The app uses text recognition to work out what the word or phrase is, and then automatic translation software translates it into the new language. The translation is then pasted over the original location, practically in real time. RealtimeGood for single words…but if we write ‘to’ the app, can it help visitors with first other languages?Microsoft, Google and Nuance areall using ‘deep neural networks’ research to not only translate oral language, almost of the fly, but to work on nuance.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu-nlQqFCKg&feature=youtu.behttp://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21569014-simultaneous-translation-computer-getting-closer-conquering-babelBing translator is a popular microsoft product, which is relying on crwod sourcing to tune their translations to lessesn errors
  • https://plus.google.com/117291608766433950060/posts/Z1PV8ng3HxUGoogle+ Hangout is like a personalized Facebook. You can connect with a group of people, live chat or video stream, share files etc.Hangout Captions is an app that connects live transcription services directly into a Google+ Hangout, improving accessibility for participants who are deaf or hard of hearing.Using the Sign Language Interpreter app, deaf or hard of hearing users who prefer sign language can invite interpreters to speak and sign for them during a Hangout. They'll always see their interpreter at the top right of the window, and they'll become the focus of the Hangout whenever their interpreter speaks for them.
  • Open Broadcaster Software is free and open source software for recording and live streaming. Source code is available to everyone to contribute and improve. Both 32 and 64 bit versions are available and it's absolutely free!For museum events- similar to skype but can be broadcast to an audience- like a live podcast. Cultural content from one camera available anywhere in the world art talks, red carpet, etc. Gives museum the chance to be its own broadcast channel.
  • 3D printing is a truly 'disruptive technology. It allows local designs to be created and realized both inexpensively and unconstrained by traditional manufacturing processes. Thus complex shapes can be created in various scales, can be sent anywhere as digital files, and can both be used for new product creation, or copying. This, combined with 3D scanning offers very interesting opportunities for museums in mapping exact physical replicas of dimensional collectionsPrinting guns has already happened. At this point ammunition cannot be printed. This should be an interesting discussion for museums to lead, given the current issues about gun control.http://video.ft.com/v/1700835179001/3D-printing-bigger-than-internet-?utm_source=taboola
  • A new effort under way at the world's largest museum and research institution could eventually mean more of its 137 million objects will be publicly available, even if just via 3D digital models.Now, with that high-end scanner, as well as less expensive tools that include normal digital cameras and freely available cloud-based digitization software, Metallo and his fellow 3D digitization coordinator Vince Rossi are slowly setting out to begin building a new Smithsonian digital archive. They hope this initiative will eventually lead to scores of 3D printed exhibits, as well as countless 3D models that could theoretically be used in the museums, in schools, or just about anywhere people have an interest in the Smithsonian's vast physical holdings."digital surrogate," a "new form of museum collection" that could mean a wealth of information that could be available to anyone with a computer, or at the very least, to a wide variety of museums, schools, and other interested institutions.
  • you'll see more engagement tools that are using gamification to get people to stay focused on their products - and the core to the experience and gaming in general is adding game-like features like a points system and an end goal. Gamification can have a low-tech approach.  You can add "points" to card to build towards an end goal that would be the accumulation of one visit - and you could add a deeper "game" to reward people that visit more often.There's a lot of gaming elements that can be useful, but game-like approaches may be best developed with a specific user or target age group in mind.  Ausmus: Surveys have indicated that our audiences have a variety of different ways of responding to cultural activities, known as culture segments. Some segments value being a part of something bigger, or seeing reviews and recommendations from other people. Others segments find loyalty programs and 'clubs' appealing and like to be given advance notice of events as a sense of exclusivity, while others like to have their existing knowledge and tastes challenged.
  • http://vimeo.com/60866008considerwhatanyonewhodoesn’tcareaboutthattechnologywould stand togain. greatestmistakeanyinteraction designer canmakeisto presume thattheaudienceiswillingtoinvest time learning some new-fangled bit of tech.letthecontentshine, andgetthe tech out ofthewayhttp://www.fastcodesign.com/1671845/5-lessons-in-ui-design-from-a-breakthrough-museum#1
  • Firstly, the positioning system can detect a museum goer’s location in the museum and provide additional information on the object, exhibition, or installation the individual is viewing. Secondly, it allows museum administration to access valuable data about patron traffic and engagement with exhibitions-LED light bulb is a chip that flashes a pattern, pulsing too fast for humans to see but the perfect speed for the camera lens of a mobile devic-picks up the light signal transmitted by the LED bulb and tracks the user’s location with incredible accuracy and speed
  • Smart phone companies are searching for more market and they are finding them with seniors, and elsewhere.Fuji has a dedicated android phone with: rubberized coating to add grip, clearly labelled home butto , slightly raised volume, camera and on/off side buttons, touchscreen deliberately less sensitive to cut back on erroneous key presses, equipped with an alarm — in case of emergencies which dials out to programmed numbers, stripped down appsAmericans between the ages of 55 and 64 are adopting smartphones at a faster rate than any other age group. Just about 30 percent of all mobile-equipped, soon-to-be seniors now own a smartphone-5%in Q2 jump this year. Compares to 43% overall market, with younger people at 62%
  • The best businesses now are offering transparency to their operations. Short term business who are in the market just for profit may not do so, but museums are in it for the long haul.
  • Revealing analytics is good for the public, and especially for the Board and fundersMuseums offer as much or as little as they get support for – their hours through to the endowment level
  • Social media isn’t going anywhere, but using them as independent platforms could eventually be replaced by the “API approach,” where app and platform developers embed social media directly into the software itself at the root level in the same way social media sharing is now built-in on some many blogs and websites. The primary interaction then is not on twitter or facebook, but external.
  • MOOC = Massive open online courseHarvard, MIT and other have started edX – free learning designed specifically for interactive study via the web . https://www.edx.org/Coursera- another similar option- envision a future where the top universities are educating not only thousands of students, but millions. https://www.coursera.org/beauty of MOOCs for the student is a low barrier to enrollment.  This allows any student to freely experiment and explore various topics.The upside of MOOCs – vastly increasing the reach of your educational offeringsappeal to our core audience: smart, creative life-long learners who actively pursue informal education.
  • We have seen the Arab spring, Occupy, tax cut protests against tax evaders in the UK.First Globals are exhibiting - in Occupy and other movements. This is a worldwide issue. Museums are worldwide, with networks. In late January 2013, Café Prague, a popular hangout for Iranian intellectuals and artists in Tehran, closed its doors after refusing an order by authorities to install surveillance cameras to monitor its customers and their interactions. Museums have great thinkers, material proof of history. Providing a space- physical or virtual- for conversations couldBenefit those concerned with our future.
  • http://idlenomore.ca/about-us/musicVAGIdle No More is an ongoing protestmovement originating among the Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprising the First Nations, It has consisted of a number of political actions worldwide, inspired in part by the liquid diethunger strike of Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence[1] and further coordinated via social media. A reaction to alleged legislative abuses of indigenous treaty rightsUsed VAG as a ‘place’ to attract media- and drew parallels to a particular omnibus legislation that has broad implications for many ecological issues.“What we see today breaks our laws," Squamish hereditary chief Ian Campbell said at today's rally. "Stephen Harper and his government, they have no respect for our lands, our territories, or our people. They’re treating everyone like Indians now.”
  • about the March For The Alternative.Occupation and protest: Documenting social unrestKept placard and material ephemera- stored for a year then gave back to demonstrators- who were happy to see their creations again, and had another march
  • http://www.wiredacademic.com/2011/09/how-video-games-use-education-and-learning-elements-infographic/Xbox360 and PlayStation 3 in use in much health research. We’ll also see an increase in the number of gamers using social networking alongside gameplay.adding game-like features like a points system and an end goal. for museums - finding a balance between distracting the user from reality with enhancing it through technology.  Gamification can have a low-tech approach.  You can add "points" to card to build towards an end goal that would be the accumulation of one visit - and you could add a deeper "game" to reward people that visit more often.Lack of digital fluency is affecting scholarly collaborationStudent-specific data can now be used to customize online course platforms and suggest resources to students in the same way that businesses tailor advertisements and offers to customershttp://www.scilearn.com/blog/2013-trends-education.php
  • Selfless Portraits is a collaborative art project aiming to bridge the gap between technology and humanity by encouraging small, creative gestures between strangers across the globe.http://selflessportraits.com/about/Creators: Ivan Cash & Jeff Greenspan12,000 users from 90 countries have submitted more than 8,000 "inspiring and delightfully unique" portraitsWhat if users could make portraits of collection images?
  • Museums have the ability to be agents of change. They have material history and the stories related to that history. Material culture is a reflection of society and its influences, both technologically and culturally. If visitors are able to capture their interests, and link them to their lives and other points of interface, they may be able to use the facts, feelings and epiphanies they reach as motivators in their lives.To connect one place to another, one concept to another, and one person to another through social networks both physical and virtual, the museum becomes more valuable to us as individuals and as a community.Curation will play a key role in enabling this to happen. Curation may shift to the new way we are seeing people curate information, music, books and news articles.
  • Museums are trustworthy, have resources and tradition. Many of these things are the anchor that prevent nimbleness.
  • http://www.museumstrategyblog.com/museum_strategies/2009/03/museum-branding-a-new-age-for-museums-not-cathedrals-but-bazaars.htmlbranding is a vision of a museum’s personality and purpose long before it is a logo“brand is a contemporary tool for management. By asserting what a museum stands for, it suggests what it should and shouldn’t do.”Many museum organizations have not yet embraced this side of branding. IN a recent survey, just 17% agreed that branding “guides how our staff behave”. Branding is key in facilitating museums’ evolution from teaching institutions into cultural platforms for discussion and sharing.Tate as an example. Its branding is an invitation to “look again, think again,” an invitation which is equally applicable in a museum or in the online community and transforms the museum into a participatory platform.
  • Nina Simon traditional museum was more predictable, and this is what many current museums still base their existence on
  • Regular museum org chart- relationships within silos
  • Nina Simon is a disruptor. She has been writing ‘Museum 2.0’ since 006, is the director of the Santa Cruz museum of art at age 35.Nina is a one-woman affector of change.What she is mainly about is changing the Brand of the museum, no mean feat.In order to create the changes Nina wants, there are a couple of things that museums must doCOMFORT, VISIBILITY, VALUE
  • Nina Simon is a disruptor. She has been writing ‘Museum 2.0’ since 006, is the director of the Santa Cruz museum of art at age 35.Nina is a one-woman effector of change.What she is mainly about is changing the Brand of the museum, no mean feat.In order to create the changes Nina wants, there are a couple of things that museums must do
  • By adding social media many museum shave grown their reach
  • Brand growth outside the confines of the org chartBy continually referencing sparks from influencers outside the museum, the museum will stay relevant, will be able to report to its Boardand funders, and will evolve as an entity to continue to be trusted but also aware
  • Brand growth outside the confines of the org chartBy continually referencing sparks from influencers outside the museum, the museum will stay relevant, will be able to report to its Boardand funders, and will evolve as an entity to continue to be trusted but also aware

Strategic foresight and museum engagement. bev dywan Strategic foresight and museum engagement. bev dywan Presentation Transcript

  • Topic: Museum relevancy and visitor engagement options• Interesting tech, social and educational trends• Museum-related examples• Q+A, your insights about museums and visitors
  • Bev Dywan• Worked in museum exhibit design from1984 – 2009, mainly in experience design• Received a Master‟s degree in Strategic Foresight and Innovation about museums and visitors
  • You• Education?• Design?• Social Media?• Other? about museums and visitors
  • • What is strategic foresight? and why on earth am I talking about it?• Looks at complexity of issues, combining design/business and future thinking- through deep analysis, holistically- bigger problems within the ecosystem• Find meaning through environmental scans to museums and visitors about find *sparks*
  • • What is strategic foresight?• Human elements driving solutions• Opens up to „what is a possible future?‟ about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsBLUETOOTH STICKERS about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsAUGMENTED REALITY about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsAPPS FOR SIMULTANEOUS TRANSLATION about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsLIVE TRANSCRIPTION about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsOPEN BROADCAST STREAMING about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trends3D SCANNINGAND PRINTING about museums and visitors
  • • Current uptake3D SCANNINGAND PRINTING about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsGAMING about museums and visitors
  • Current uptakeThe Cleveland Museum of Art• “Local projects”Created game-likeinteractiveswithin the museum about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsINDOOR GPS about museums and visitors
  • • Current tech trendsNORMALIZATIONOF THESMART PHONE about museums and visitors
  • • Current biz trendsTRANSPARENCY about museums and visitors
  • • Current uptakeTRANSPARENCY
  • • Current education trendsBYODs, iPADs, MOOCs, GAMIFICATION &SOCIALIZATION, CROWDSOURCINGCONTENT“Culture eats strategy for breakfast”- go towhere the culture is about museums and visitors
  • • Current education trendsMOOCs about museums and visitors
  • • Current social trendsRESISTANCE TO INEQUITY about museums and visitors
  • • Current social trendsRESISTANCE TO OPPRESSION about museums and visitors
  • • Current uptakeMuseum of London about museums and visitors
  • • Current education trends• Gamification about museums and visitors
  • Current social media– on Facebook about museums and visitors
  • Possible solutions– Meta Connections about museums and visitors
  • Current museum trendsBrand• trust about museums and visitors “On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog.”
  • Current museumBRAND about museums and visitors
  • Traditional museumBRAND about museums and visitors
  • Museum org chart about museums and visitors
  • Museum influencer NINA SIMONCOMFORT,VISIBILITY,PUBLIC VALUE about museums and visitors
  • Current museum trends NINA SIMON: change to museum brand1.Clarity on the brand and what the institution is, and wants to portray2.Buy-in from every level of the museum – the Board to the cafeteria staff about museums and visitors
  • Current museum trendsBRAND about museums and visitors
  • Current museum trendsSOCIAL MEDIA about museums and visitors
  • Future museumBRAND about museums and visitors
  • bev@designin3d.comabout museums and visitors