Repetition, Duplicates, and
Doppelgängers
Amy McFarland, Beth Ransom, and
Konrad Dunbar
Cycle of Catherines
• Catherine I: born Earnshaw, dies Linton (never
Heathcliff because marrying him would
“degrade” her)
...
Repetition of motherless children
• Heathcliff’s an apparent orphan
• Cathy and Hareton’s mothers die immediately
after ch...
Cycle of abuse/ Heathcliff’s revenge
• Hindley’s mistreatment of Heathcliff is
intentionally mimicked in Heathcliff’s abus...
Cycle of abuse/ Heathcliff’s revenge
• Result of Heathcliff raising Hareton that way:
“Hareton [seems] a personification o...
Lintons
• Frail/sickly/die young
• Linton Heathcliff is described as “a pale,
delicate, effeminate boy, who might have
bee...
Catherine as doppelgänger
• Definition of doppelgänger: A ghostly double of a living
person, especially one that haunts it...
Sources
• Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
• Woodford, Donna C. "An overview of Wuthering Heights." Literature
Resource C...
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Repetition duplicatesdoppelgängers

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Repetition duplicatesdoppelgängers

  1. 1. Repetition, Duplicates, and Doppelgängers Amy McFarland, Beth Ransom, and Konrad Dunbar
  2. 2. Cycle of Catherines • Catherine I: born Earnshaw, dies Linton (never Heathcliff because marrying him would “degrade” her) • Catherine II: born Linton, becomes Heathcliff, and then will become Earnshaw • The cycle begins and ends with Earnshaw.
  3. 3. Repetition of motherless children • Heathcliff’s an apparent orphan • Cathy and Hareton’s mothers die immediately after childbirth • Catherine, Hindley, and Linton’s mothers die when they’re young • Every main (non-narrator) character except Edgar and Isabella Linton is essentially motherless
  4. 4. Cycle of abuse/ Heathcliff’s revenge • Hindley’s mistreatment of Heathcliff is intentionally mimicked in Heathcliff’s abuse of Hareton – Heathcliff feels successful: “…And [Hareton will] never be able to emerge from his bathos of coarseness and ignorance. I’ve got him faster than his scandal of a father secured me, and lower; for he takes pride in his brutishness.”
  5. 5. Cycle of abuse/ Heathcliff’s revenge • Result of Heathcliff raising Hareton that way: “Hareton [seems] a personification of my youth.... the ghost of my immortal love, of my wild endeavors to hold my right, my degradation, my pride, my happiness, and my anguish” – Heathcliff (in some ways) creates a duplicate of himself
  6. 6. Lintons • Frail/sickly/die young • Linton Heathcliff is described as “a pale, delicate, effeminate boy, who might have been taken for [Edgar’s] younger brother, so strong was the resemblance…”
  7. 7. Catherine as doppelgänger • Definition of doppelgänger: A ghostly double of a living person, especially one that haunts its fleshly counterpart. (from freedictionary.com) • Catherine and Heathcliff each reference the idea that they share a soul, or are the same person (“I am Heathcliff”, “would you like to live with your soul in the grave?”) • Catherine haunts Heathcliff: “She has disturbed me, night and day, through eighteen years- incessantly- remorselessly- till yesternight…”
  8. 8. Sources • Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë • Woodford, Donna C. "An overview of Wuthering Heights." Literature Resource Center. Detroit: Gale, Literature Resource Center. Gale. Baltimore County Public Schools. 12 Oct. 2010 <http://go.galegroup.com/ps/start.do?p=LitRC&u=bcps>.

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