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Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
Succeeding in Reading
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Succeeding in Reading

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Beth N. Davis' ARP

Beth N. Davis' ARP

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  • 1. Succeeding in Reading A Practical Analysis of Student Choice in the Reading Classroom Beth N. Davis University of Maryland University College EDTP 645 Subject Methods and Assessments November 2013 Professor: Dr. John P. Sullivan
  • 2. Succeeding in Reading: Introduction Reading Below Proficient Level: 68% of Grade 8 students 64% of Grade 12 students Writing Below Proficient Level: 69% of Grade 8 students 77% of Grade 12 students
  • 3. Succeeding in Reading: Background Disengaged, inactive students show little success on standardized tests, often fail to meet school/curriculum standards. Kelly Gallagher asserts that in order to foster success in reading, educators must validate the literacy choices made by students.
  • 4. Succeeding in Reading: Background Whole Class Novel Student Choice
  • 5. Succeeding in Reading: Purpose
  • 6. Succeeding in Reading: Research Questions Primary Research Question: Will students who chose their reading materials for Language Arts class be more successful than those who are assigned specific reading material for the same class?
  • 7. Succeeding in Reading: Research Questions Secondary Research Questions: Will students who read material that they have chosen read for longer periods of time (quantitatively)? Will students who read material that they have chosen read more books (quantitatively)? Will students who read material that they have chosen participate more often in classroom discussions? Will students who read material that they have chosen have higher quality classroom participation? Will students who read material that they have chosen score higher on final projects?
  • 8. Succeeding in Reading: Impact and Context So? Where’s the Research?
  • 9. Succeeding in Reading: Literature Review Three Specific Points: Student success in reading is crucial. Student engagement increases success. Student choice increases engagement.
  • 10. Succeeding in Reading: Literature Review Student success is crucial. • • • • • • • • International Reading Association (Moore et al., 1999, p. 4) Act and Key’s Analysis of No Child Left Behind Biancarosa’s commentary on secondary education Combined with Act and Key’s notes underline this importance. Engage in order to develop skills. Student reading success impacts other classes as well. Indicate students’ college preparedness Middle and high school can help students improve reading even after the formative years.
  • 11. Succeeding in Reading: Literature Review Student engagement increases success. • • • • • • • • • Student skill will not increase without engagement. Students who are not engage will not realize their potential. Student engagement levels affect student progress. External motivation is not strong enough in adolescents. Interest is key. Successful reading = proficient reading Interest=Frequency Student Discipline is lower for engaged students. Engagement predicted success in students Teaching to the test lowers engagement
  • 12. Succeeding in Reading: Literature Review Student choice increases engagement. • • • • Garet asserts that limited choices help engage students. Student choice helps students get How do you make shared tome interesting? Fostering a lifelong love of reading
  • 13. Succeeding in Reading: Literature Review CHOICE = ENGAGEMENT ENGAGEMENT = SUCCESS Does this mean that CHOICE = SUCCESS? Let’s find out…
  • 14. Succeeding in Reading: Methods Florida Virtual School 9th/10th Grade Students th Grade Level 9 Individual Student Success on Final Classroom Activities
  • 15. Succeeding in Reading: Methods Group A=Control Group Assigned Materials Group B= Experimental Group Encouraged to select their own material
  • 16. Succeeding in Reading: Methods Data Collection: Student Questionnaire Reading Logs (Minutes and Material Recorded) Participation Log (Quantity and Quality) Written Piece at the End of the Unit Student Testimonials (video or written pieces)
  • 17. Succeeding in Reading: Methods Data Analysis: Student Questionnaire Reading Logs (Minutes and Material Recorded) Participation Log (Quantity and Quality) Written Piece at the End of the Unit Student Testimonials (video or written pieces)
  • 18. Succeeding in Reading: Study Results & Implications Findings: Students in the Choice Group Read More Often Students in the Choice Group engaged more in classroom discussion (quality and quantity) Students in both groups performed equally as well on the end of unit assignment. Students in the choice group reported more engagement.
  • 19. Succeeding in Reading: Reflection Not a stark difference More time needed Face to face classroom Surprised by end results
  • 20. Succeeding in Reading: Reflection Future Studies
  • 21. References Act, L. B., & Key, N. Q. (2008). Implementing the No Child Left Behind Act: Using Student Engagement to Improve Adolescent Literacy NCREL Quick Key 10 Action Guide. Issues and trends in literacy education, 129. Allington, R. L. (2002). What I've learned about effective reading instruction from a decade of studying exemplary elementary classroom teachers. Phi Delta Kappa, 83(10), 740-747. Alvermann, D., Phleps, S.F., & Gillis, V.R. (2013) Content area reading and literacy: Succeeding in today's diverse classroom. Boston, MA: Pearson. Brewster, A. B., & Bowen, G. L. (2004). Teacher support and the school engagement of Latino middle and high school students at risk of school failure. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 21(1), 47-67. Gallagher, K. (2009). Readicide: How schools are killing reading and what you can do about it. Stenhouse Publishers. Garet, M. S., Porter, A. C., Desimone, L., Birman, B. F., & Yoon, K. S. (2001). What makes professional development effective? Results from a national sample of teachers. American educational research journal, 38(4), 915-945.
  • 22. Gettinger, M., & Seibert, J. K. (2002). Best practices in increasing academic learning time. Best practices in school psychology IV, 1, 773-787. Krashen, S. (1993). The Power of Reading. Englewood, Col.: Libraries Unlimited, Inc Moore, D.W., Bean, T.W., Birdyshaw, D. & Rycik, J. (1999). Adolescent literacy: A position statement. International Reading Association. Plaut, S. (Ed.). (2009). The right to literacy in secondary schools: Creating a culture of thinking. New York, NY: Teachers College, Columbia University. Rich, M. (2009). A New Assignment: Pick Books You Like. The New York Times. The New York Times, 30. Shernoff, D. J., Csikszentmihalyi, M., Shneider, B., & Shernoff, E. S. (2003). Student engagement in high school classrooms from the perspective of flow theory. School Psychology Quarterly, 18(2), 158 Skiba, R. J., Michael, R. S., Nardo, A. C., & Peterson, R. L. (2002). The color of discipline: Sources of racial and gender disproportionality in school punishment. The urban review, 34(4), 317-342. Worthy, J., Turner, M., & Moorman, M. (1998). The Precarious Place of Self-Selected Reading. Language Arts, 75(4), 296-304.

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