Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
At Expo 09
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

At Expo 09

  • 504 views
Published

Resources from the PaTTAN AT EXPO 2009

Resources from the PaTTAN AT EXPO 2009

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
504
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Audience  Special & General Educators  Administrators  Parents & Family Members  Early Intervention Providers  Individuals with Disabilities PaTTAN  Speech-Language Pathologists  Rehabilitation Counselors Assistive Technology (AT)  Service Coordinators  Occupational and Physical Therapists EXPO 2009  Vision and Hearing Consultants  Information Technology Specialists  Higher Education Faculty & Students  Paraeducators  Other persons interested in Assistive Technology TIME VALUE Continuing Education Tuesday, November 10, 2009 Radisson Hotel Valley Forge King of Prussia, PA Wednesday, November 11, 2009 Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network Holiday Inn Conference Center & Hotel Lehigh Valley / Allentown, PA Thursday, November 12, 2009 Blair County Convention Center CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED This course is offered for .5 ASHA CEUs (Advanced level, Professional area). Altoona, PA PaTTAN will offer up to 5 approved continuing Friday, November 13, 2009 education clock hours with the Academy for Radisson Hotel Pittsburgh Green Tree Certification of Vision Rehabilitation & Education Pittsburgh, PA Harrisburg, PA 17112-2764 6340 Flank Drive, Suite 600 Professionals. Lancaster-Lebanon I.U. 13 9:00 am—Presentations Begin  Act 48, ASHA & ACVREP—Up to 5 Act 48 hours, up to .5 ASHA CEUs & up to 5 ACVREP CEs will be offered 10:00 am - 4:00 pm—Exhibit Hall Open for presentations in whole hour increments. Credit will be offered for “attending” presentations in the Exhibit Hall, but not for “visiting” the Exhibit Hall. Individuals attending sessions must arrive on time and stay  Paraeducator Certificates of Attendance will be awarded the duration of the session in order to receive Act 48 Profes- sional Education hours. Requests for exceptions are to be onsite for attending presentations. brought to the attention of the individual’s Superintendent or up to 5 IU Director prior to the event.
  • 2. PaTTAN Assistive Technology (AT) EXPO 2009 Description Agenda Online Registration Exhibit Hall open 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM 8:30 am Registration Begins Please register for this PaTTAN-sponsored event by (Last entrance to Exhibit Hall - 3:30 pm) visiting our homepage at: www.pattan.net 9:00-10:00 am Concurrent PaTTAN Presentations: The Assistive Technology (AT) EXPO is an opportunity “What’s in your Toolkit? AT as for educators and families to explore software, devices and While registering online, you can peruse all PaTTAN- Supplementary Aids and Services” or sponsored continuing professional education courses/clock strategies that enable students to access curriculum and “AT Overview: Considerations for the meet with success. Participants will have “hands-on” time hour activities, receive confirmation via e-mail once you IEP” have registered for the course/activity, and keep track of with AT products, ask questions, and compare features of 10:00 am Exhibit Hall Opens AT solutions for a broad range of students including those courses/clock hour activities with the online transcript 10:15-12:15 pm 30 min. Concurrent Product Presentations feature. with very mild as well as more significant disabilities. IU (check PaTTAN website for schedule) AT consultants and PaTTAN staff will be available to 12:15-1:00 pm Lunch on your own answer questions and assist you in finding solutions to your Please register by November 2, 2009. 1:00-3:00 pm 30 min. Concurrent Product Presentations students’ technology needs. 3:00-4:00 pm 15 min. Presentations in Exhibit Hall THERE IS NO FEE TO ATTEND THE EXPO This year, there will be two concurrent PaTTAN sessions 4:00 pm Exhibit Hall Closes presented before the exhibit hall opens. We encourage all If you have difficulty registering online, please see to attend one of these sessions: Act 48, ASHA & ACVREP—Up to 5 Act 48 hours, up registration contact information under “For More to .5 ASHA CEUs and up to 5 ACVREP CEs will be Information.” What's in your Toolkit? AT as Supplementary Aids offered for presentations in whole hour increments. and Services will provide a framework for selecting and Paraeductor Certificates will also be offered. Credit will be using AT to increase opportunities for participation and offered for “attending” presentations in the Exhibit Hall, achievement for learners in the general curriculum. but not for “visiting” the Exhibit Hall. AT Overview: Considerations for the IEP will provide a For More Information basic overview of the types of AT typically used in schools environments, as well as suggestions for incorporating these items into the IEP and daily routines. Presenters For registration questions contact:  Gwen Long at 800-360-7282, ext. 3330 (in PA only), or Participating Companies 717-541-4960, ext. 3330, e-mail glong@pattan.net.  PaTTAN Assistive Technology Consultants For content questions contact: (as of 9/11/09)  PaTTAN Inclusive Practices Consultants  Nan Rodgers at 800-360-2782, ext. 3721 (in PA only) or 717-541-4960, ext. 3721, email nrodgers@pattan.net.  Intermediate Unit Assistive Technology Consultants *AbleNet *Adaptivation *Augmentative Communica-  Representatives from Companies Providing Assistive For TTY/TDD use the PA Relay System at 800-654-5984 or tion Consultants (ACCI) *Brain Injury Association of Technology 711. PA *Crick Software *Dancing Dots *Dolphin Computer Access *Don Johnston *Duxbury Systems *DynaVox/Mayer Johnson *Enabling Technologies *Freedom Scientific *HumanWare *Independent Living EXPO Objectives Aids *Keystone Magnification Center *Kurzweil/ Special Needs Intellitools *LC Technologies *Lightspeed Participants will demonstrate skills to: Technologies *Mobile Optical Services *Oticon  Describe features of AT and resources to access and *PEAL *PEN *Parent To Parent *PaTTAN/EITA implement them If you have special needs as addressed by the Americans with *Phonak *PIAT *Prentke Romich Company *RFB&D  Implement strategies for utilizing Universal Design for Disabilities Act and need assistance at this training, please contact *Sage Vision *Texthelp *Tobii ATI Learning and AT in order to improve student the Registration Contact. Reasonable efforts will be made to accommodate you. Not all vendors are exhibiting at every location. performance Check the PaTTAN website for locations at which  Assist families in AT assessment, implementation, and vendors are exhibiting and for additional vendors not decision-making listed here.
  • 3. RADISSON HOTEL VALLEY FORGE HOLIDAY INN CONFERENCE CENTER BLAIR COUNTY CONVENTION CENTER 1160 First Avenue LEHIGH VALLEY/ALLENTOWN One Convention Center Drive King of Prussia, PA 19406 7736 Adrienne Drive Altoona, PA 16602 Phone: 610-337-2000 Fax: 610-768-0183 Allentown, PA 18031 Phone: 1-800-842-5866 Fax: 814-943-8094 www.radisson.com/kingofprussiapa Phone: 610-391-1000 Fax: 610-391-1664 www.pennsylvaniameetings.com www.hilehighvalley.com From Philadelphia: Take I-76 West to exit #327 (Mall Blvd.). Bear right at first light onto From Pittsburgh & West: Mall Blvd. Turn right at 2nd light onto North Gulph Rd. and proceed to From Allentown/LVI International Airport: Take 22 West to I-78 West (roads will merge together). Follow Route 22 East and Route 220/I-99 North. Take the Plank Road the 6th light (First Avenue). Cross over First Avenue and immediately turn right into the parking lot. I-78 West to exit 49A (Route 100 South). Once you are on 100 Exit. Turn right, going south on Plank Road. Continue for south, you will see a Burger King on your right. Turn right im- approximately half a mile. Make a left onto Convention Cen- From Philadelphia Airport/I-95 South: mediately after the Burger King and the Holiday Inn is straight ter Boulevard. At the first stop light, make a left onto Conven- Take I-95 South to I-476 North, to the I-76 West (to Valley Forge) exit. tion Center Drive. ahead. Take I-76 West to exit #327 (Mall Blvd.). Bear right at 2nd light onto Mall Blvd. Turn right at 2nd light onto North Gulph Rd. and proceed to From Harrisburg: the 6th light (First Avenue). Cross over First Avenue and immediately From Harrisburg & Philadelphia: Take I-78 East to exit 49A (Route 100 South). Once you are on Take the Pennsylvania Turnpike to Bedford (Exit 11). Take 1- turn right into the parking lot. 100 South you will see a Burger King on your right. Turn right 99 North to Altoona. Take the Plank Road Exit. Turn right, From PA Turnpike: immediately after burger King and the Holiday Inn is straight going south on Plank Road. Continue for approximately half a Take the PA Turnpike (I-276/I-76) to exit 326. Proceed through the toll ahead. mile. Make a left onto Convention Center Boulevard. At the booths on the far right and take the 1st right @ exit 327, which is North From New York City/New Jersey: first stop light, make a left onto Convention Center Drive. Gulph Rd. Proceed to the 6th light (First Avenue). Cross over First Avenue and immediately turn right into the parking lot. Take I-78 West into Pennsylvania. Once you have crossed into Pennsylvania follow I-78 West to exit 49A (Route 100 South). From Points Northeast: From the North (Norristown From area): Once you are on 100 South you will see a Burger King on your Take Route 81 South to Route 80 West at Bellefonte. Take US Take Route 202 South past the King of Prussia Mall. Make a right onto 220 South. Continue on US 220 South until it meets I-99 at North Gulph Rd. Proceed to the 8th light (First Avenue). Cross over First right. Turn right immediately after Burger King and the Holiday Inn is straight ahead. Bald Eagle. Take I-99 South to Altoona. Take the Plank Road Avenue and immediately turn right into the parking lot. Or take Route 202 South to Allendale Rd. Make a right on Allendale Rd and proceed to the Exit. Turn left, going south on Plank Road. Continue for ap- From Philadelphia/Delaware: proximately half a mile. Make a left onto Convention Center 6th light (First Avenue). Cross over First Avenue and immediately turn Take the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Boulevard. At the first stop light, make a left onto Convention right into the parking lot. (Route 476 North) to exit 56 (Lehigh Valley). Follow Signs for Center Drive. From the South (West Chester area): Route 22 West/I-78 West towards Harrisburg. Follow I-78 West Take 202 North toward King of Prussia. At the first traffic light (North to exit 49A (Route 100 South). Once you are on 100 South you Gulph Rd.) turn left. Proceed to the 8th light (First Ave). Cross over First will see a Burger King on your right. Turn right immediately Avenue and immediately turn right into the parking lot. after Burger King and the Holiday Inn is straight ahead. From the West (Lancaster/Pottstown area): Take Route 422 East to the First Avenue exit (immediately after the Route From Reading/Lancaster: 23 exit). Turn left at the traffic light, then right into the parking lot. Take Route 222 North and take the exit for Fogelsville/Route 100 North. You will have to turn left onto route 100 north.. Go From Delaware/Baltimore/Washington and the South: to the 4th traffic light and make a left onto Stroh Drive. Make Follow I-95 North into Pennsylvania to I-476 North (exit 7). Take I-476 the first right onto Sycamore Drive and follow to the first stop North to exit 16B which is I-76 West. I-76 West to exit #327 (Mall sign. Bear left and the Holiday Inn is directly ahead. Blvd.). Bear right at first light onto Mall Blvd. Turn right at 2nd light onto North Gulph Rd. and proceed to the 6th light (First Avenue). Cross From Poconos (East): over First Avenue and immediately turn right into the parking lot. Take Route 33 South to Route 22 West. Follow 22 West to I-78 From New York/New Jersey: West (roads will merge together.) Stay on I-78 West to exit 49A Take the New Jersey Turnpike South to Exit 6 (PA Turnpike). Take the (Route 100 South). Once you are on 100 South you will see a PA Turnpike (I-276) to exit 326 (old exit 24). Proceed through the toll Burger King on you right. Turn right immediately after Burger booths on the far right and take the 2nd right (exit 327), which is North King and the Holiday Inn is straight ahead. Gulph Rd. Proceed to the 5th light (First Avenue). Cross over First Avenue and immediately turn right into the parking lot. From Poconos (West): Take the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike From I-476 North (Poconos & Scranton): (Route 476 South). To exit 56 (Lehigh Valley). Follow signs for Take I-476 North to PA Turnpike/NE Extension). Take I-276 West to exit #327 (Mall Blvd.). Bear right at first light onto Mall Blvd. Turn right at Route 22 West/I-78 West. Follow I-78 West to exit 49A (Route 2nd light onto North Gulph Rd. and proceed to the 6th light (First 100 South). Once you are on 100 South you will see a Burger Avenue). Cross over First Avenue and immediately turn right into the King on your right. Turn right immediately after Burger King parking lot. and the Holiday Inn is straight ahead.
  • 4. 2009 PaTTAN AT EXPO - Participating Exhibitors as of 10-7-09 Sites Attending AbleNet All sites Augmentative Communication Mounting Systems for Assistive Technology Environmental Control Units Educational & Resource Materials & Software Adaptivation, Inc. All sites Augmentative Communication Augmentative Communication Consultants, Inc. All sites Augmentative Communication Educational & Resource Materials & Software Written Communication/Computer Access Brain Injury Association of Pennsylvania All sites Educational & Resource Materials & Software Crick Software King of Prussia Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Augmentative Communication Educational & Resource Materials & Software Written Communication/Computer Access Dancing Dots King of Prussia Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Educational & Resource Materials & Software Dolphin Computer Access, Inc. All sites Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Written Communication/Computer Access Don Johnston, Inc. All sites Augmentative Communication Educational & Resource Materials & Software Written Communication/Computer Access Duxbury Systems, Inc. All sites Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment DynaVox Mayer-Johnson All sites Augmentative Communication AAC Devices & Educational Tools Enabling Technologies Co Inc All sites Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Freedom Scientific All sites Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Educational & Resource Materials & Software 1
  • 5. Sites Attending HumanWare All sites Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Independent Living Aids All sites Adaptive Toys Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Educational & Resource Materials & Software Keystone Magnification Center King of Prussia, Allentown Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Kurzweil / IntelliTools All sites Educational & Resource Materials & Software LC Technologies All sites Written Communication/Computer Access Augmentative Communication Environmental Control Units Liftvest Lightspeed Technologies, Inc. All sites Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Mobile Optical Services Inc Altoona, Pittsburgh Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Oticon - CANCELLED Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Educational & Resource Materials & Software Parent Education & Advocacy Leadership (PEAL) Altoona & Pittsburgh Information on the PEAL Center; supports and resources for families and communities. Parent Education Network (PEN) King of Prussia, Allentown Educational & Resource Materials & Software Parent to Parent of Pennsylvania All sites Parent matching and support program PaTTAN / EITA All sites Educational & Resource Materials & Software Pennsylvania Initiative on Assistive Technology (PIAT) All sites Adaptive Toys Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Augmentative Communication Educational & Resource Materials & Software Environmental Control Units Written Communication/Computer Access AT for daily living and self-help 2
  • 6. Sites Attending Phonak All sites Access Tech. for Individuals Deaf/Hard of Hearing Prentke Romich Company All sites Augmentative Communication Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic (RFB&D) King of Prussia, Pittsburgh Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Educational & Resource Materials & Software Accessible versions of general curriculum materials SAGE Technologies All sites Access Tech. for Individuals w/Blindness & Visual Impairment Texthelp Systems Inc. All sites Written Communication/Computer Access Educational & Resource Materials & Software Tobii ATI All sites Augmentative Communication Words+, Inc. All sites Augmentative Communication Educational & Resource Materials & Software 3
  • 7. RADISSON HOTEL PITTSBURGH GREEN TREE 101 Radisson Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Phone: 412-922-8400 Fax: 412-922-8981 www.radisson.com/pittsburghpa From Philadelphia, Harrisburg and East: PA Turnpike West to Pittsburgh Exit 57 (Pittsburgh exit at Monroe- ville.) Follow 376 West toward Pittsburgh. Proceed through the Squirrel Hill Tunnel. As you are passing downtown Pittsburgh you will see signs for Fort Pitt Bridge. Cross the bridge and head through the Fort Pitt Tunnel. As you exit the tunnel you will now be on 279 South to Airport. Go 2 miles and take the Green Tree/Crafton exit. The ramp will split immediately so veer to the left. At stop sign make left onto Mansfield Avenue. Go through exactly two lights and The Radisson Hotel will be the next drive on the right. From Erie, Buffalo and North: Take 79 South towards Pittsburgh. Do not use exit 21 Pittsburgh!!! Continue on 79S to the Pittsburgh Exit #59A. Merge onto I-279N. Exit I-279N at #4 Green Tree/Mt. Lebanon. Stay in far left lane. At traffic light make left turn onto Green Tree Road (Rt 121). At next traffic light make a left turn onto Mansfield through two traffic lights. Radisson Drive is the first right after the second. An illuminated sign marks the driveway. From Downtown Pittsburgh Go over the Fort Pitt Bridge and through the Fort Pitt Tunnel. After exiting the tunnel you will proceed approximately two miles. You will exit 279 at the Green Tree/Crafton exit. The ramp will split immediately so veer to left. At stop sign make left onto Mansfield Avenue. Go through exactly two lights and The Radisson Hotel will be the next drive on the right. From West Virginia I-70 East: Enter on I-79 North. Follow 79 North to Pittsburgh. Approximately 20 miles. You will see signs for 279 North-Pittsburgh. Follow this ramp to enter onto 279 North. You will exit at the Green Tree/Mt. Lebanon exit. Please stay in the left-hand lane. At light make left and proceed across the overpass. At next light make left onto Mansfield Avenue. Go through exactly two lights and The Radisson Hotel will be the next drive on the right. From Ohio and West: Take the PA Turnpike (76 East) to 79 South. Follow this to exit for 279 South to Pittsburgh. Follow this to downtown Pittsburgh where you will follow the signs for the Fort Pitt Bridge. As you cross the bridge you will get into the lanes for the Fort Pitt Tunnel. After exiting the tunnel you will proceed approximately two miles. You will exit 279 at the Green Tree/Crafton exit. The ramp will split immediately so veer to left. At stop sign make left onto Mansfield Avenue. Go through exactly two lights and The Radisson Hotel will be the next drive on the right. From the South Hills: Take Route 19 North (Washington Road) and follow it to Cochran Road. Turn left onto Cochran Road and follow to Green Tree Road (Route 121 North). Bear right onto Green Tree Road. Green Tree Road crosses over I-279 overpass. As you cross over, please stay in left-hand lane. You will turn left onto Mansfield Avenue. Go through exactly two lights and The Radisson Hotel will be the next drive on the right.
  • 8. Presentation Schedule King of Prussia - November 10, 2009 Presentations in Break Out Rooms Time Presentations & Rooms 9:00 – 10:00 AM What’s in your Toolkit? – North Ballroom 9:00 – 10:00 AM AT Overview: Consideration for the IEP – South Ballroom North Ballroom South Ballroom Ross Room 10:15 – 10:45 AM Prentke Romich Texthelp Dancing Dots 11:00 – 11:30 AM Words+ Adaptivation Lightspeed 11:45 – 12:15 PM Don Johnston Tobii ATI 12:15 – 1:00 PM Lunch Break 1:00 – 1:30 PM Crick Software LC Technologies HumanWare Augmentative Kurzweil / Intellitools 1:45 – 2:15 PM Communication Freedom Scientific Consultants, Inc. DynaVox Recording for the Blind 2:30 – 3:00 PM Keystone Magnification Mayer-Johnson and Dyslexic (RFB&D) 15 Minute Presentations in Exhibit Hall 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 Crick Software Prentke Romich Crick Software Prentke Romich Don Johnston RFB&D Don Johnston RFB&D HumanWare Tobii ATI HumanWare Tobii ATI LC Technologies LC Technologies
  • 9. Presentation Schedule Allentown - November 11, 2009 Presentations in Break Out Rooms Time Presentations & Rooms 9:00 – 10:00 AM What’s in your Toolkit? – Roosevelt Room 9:00 – 10:00 AM AT Overview: Consideration for the IEP – Lincoln Room Roosevelt Room Lincoln Room Room 117 DynaVox Recording for the Blind 10:15 – 10:45 AM Mayer-Johnson and Dyslexic (RFB&D) 11:00 – 11:30 AM Texthelp LC Technologies Keystone Magnification 11:45 – 12:15 PM Words+ Kurzweil / Intellitools HumanWare 12:15 – 1:00 PM Lunch Break Augmentative 1:00 – 1:30 PM Communication Freedom Scientific Lightspeed Consultants, Inc. 1:45 – 2:15 PM Tobii ATI Adaptivation 2:30 – 3:00 PM Don Johnston Prentke Romich 15 Minute Presentations in Exhibit Hall 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 Tobii ATI HumanWare Tobii ATI HumanWare Prentke Romich LC Technologies Prentke Romich LC Technologies RFB&D Don Johnston RFB&D Don Johnston
  • 10. Presentation Schedule Altoona - November 12, 2009 Presentations in Break Out Rooms Time Presentations & Rooms 9:00 – 10:00 AM What’s in your Toolkit? – Rooms 202 - 204 9:00 – 10:00 AM AT Overview: Considerations for the IEP – Rooms 205/206 Rooms 202 - 204 Rooms 205/206 Rooms 207/208 Augmentative Lightspeed 10:15 – 10:45 AM Communication HumanWare Consultants, Inc. DynaVox Recording for the Blind 11:00 – 11:30 AM Don Johnston Mayer-Johnson and Dyslexic (RFB&D) 11:45 – 12:15 PM Prentke Romich Adaptivation Freedom Scientific 12:15 – 1:00 PM Lunch Break 1:00 – 1:30 PM Tobii ATI Mobile Optical 1:45 – 2:15 PM LC Technologies Texthelp Words+ 2:30 – 3:00 PM Kurzweil / Intellitools 15 Minute Presentations in Exhibit Hall 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 HumanWare Don Johnston HumanWare Don Johnston LC Technologies Prentke Romich LC Technologies Prentke Romich RFB&D Tobii ATI RFB&D Tobii ATI
  • 11. Presentation Schedule Pittsburgh Green Tree - November 13, 2009 Presentations in Break Out Rooms Time Presentations & Rooms 9:00 – 10:00 AM What’s in your Toolkit? – Maple/Oak/Birch/Poplar Rooms 9:00 – 10:00 AM AT Overview: Consideration for the IEP – Duquesne Room Maple/Oak Rooms Duquesne Room Birch/Poplars Rooms 10:15 – 10:45 AM Tobii ATI Adaptivation Freedom Scientific Don Johnston 11:00 – 11:30 AM Words+ Mobile Optical Texthelp 11:45 – 12:15 PM LC Technologies 12:15 – 1:00 PM Lunch Break DynaVox 1:00 – 1:30 PM Kurzweil / Intellitools Mayer-Johnson 1:45 – 2:15 PM Prentke Romich HumanWare Augmentative Recording for the Blind 2:30 – 3:00 PM Communication and Dyslexic (RFB&D) Consultants, Inc. 15 Minute Presentations in Exhibit Hall 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45 Don Johnston HumanWare Don Johnston HumanWare Prentke Romich LC Technologies Prentke Romich LC Technologies Tobii ATI RFB&D Tobii ATI RFB&D
  • 12. A Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Consideration Toolkit COMPONENT A: Introduction and Preparation for Use COMPONENT A provides an overview of the SaS consideration process, describing who is responsible for actions at each step of the process. --Review COMPONENT A prior to the use of any other SaS Toolkit components. --Refer to COMPONENT B throughout the use of the SaS Toolkit • The Supplementary Aids and Services Toolkit guides teams through steps that lead to the identification of services and supports to enable a student with a disability to learn and succeed within general education classroom settings. • The SaS Consideration Toolkit consists of five components that are packaged separately to facilitate ease of use. • PaTTAN and Intermediate Unit consultants have been trained in the use of these tools, and are available to provide on-site support to IEP teams as they become familiar with the process. PaTTAN/BSE/PDE Developed in Collaboration with Dr. Gail McGregor Version 1.3 September, 2008 A-1
  • 13. Using the SaS Toolkit Components A sequence is outlined to guide teams through the SaS Consideration Process. In practice, the use of the tools is an interactive rather than linear process, with two exceptions: • Learning about the use of the tool is a necessary first step • Creation of the student profile is a critical second step The remaining steps build upon this foundation. The entire process is summarized in the table below. Implementation Suggested Personnel Toolkit Component(s) Sequence Learn About the SaS Special education Overview and Preparation for Consideration Toolkit administrators, PaTTAN and Use and Process IU Technical Assistance personnel (TaC) serve as resources to IEP team Compile and organize All team members Student Profile information about the student Create profile of General and special educator SaS Consideration Tool, Step 1 general education compile information and share SAS Self Check setting(s) with team Identify potential All team members SaS Consideration Tool, Step 2 barriers to learning and curriculum access in the general education classroom Identify strategies and All team members; specialists SaS Consideration Tool, Step 3 services to eliminate as needed to supplement team barriers expertise (e.g., AT specialist, A Quick Guide to behavior specialist, Supplementary Aids and PaTTAN/IU consultants) Services Discuss and analyze All team members and SaS Consideration Tool, Step 4 appropriate SaS consultants options and determine viable alternatives for implementation A-2
  • 14. Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Consideration Toolkit Introduction Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) create a system of support that enables many students with disabilities to learn and participate alongside typical peers, regardless of their unique instructional needs and differences. Consistent with the least restrictive environment (LRE) principle of IDEA, IEP teams must thoughtfully consider a full array of Supplementary Aids and Services that make it possible for students with disabilities to be included in general education classrooms, non-academic, and extracurricular activities. The SaS Consideration Toolkit, developed for use within schools throughout Pennsylvania, provides a systematic approach to structure this process. This approach requires IEP team members to collaboratively gather and analyze information about a student in relation to the regular education classroom(s) that represent the first environment(s) considered as his/her educational placement. The tools guide information gathering efforts that begin prior to the writing of an IEP, continuing throughout the program planning and IEP development process. After completing the activities that comprise this Toolkit, teams are able to identify environmentally-referenced Supplementary Aids and Services that will support a student to participate and learn within the general education classroom. Components of this Toolkit incorporate several well-established curricular and program planning practices. First, the consideration process utilizes the person/setting discrepancy analysis strategies that are characteristic of the ecological inventory process (Brown et al., 1979), familiar to those with experience developing individualized curricula for students with significant disabilities. Second, strategies embedded in materials developed by the Center for Applied Special Education Technology (CAST) in their innovative work in the area of Universal Design for Learning have been utilized. Specifically, this Toolkit incorporates the concept of systematically reviewing the methods, materials, and assessments in a lesson, unit, or curriculum, a strategy utilized in CAST’s Curriculum Barriers Tool (CAST, nd). Finally, Supplementary Aids and Services domains, identified by Etscheidt and Bartlett (1999), have been utilized in this Toolkit as an organizational structure for potential support strategies and services. The SaS Consideration Toolkit has been piloted by schools teams in Pennsylvania who support students with a range of disabilities, including those with disability labels of mental retardation, learning disability, and autism. While this Toolkit was designed to help teams during the educational planning and placement decision-making process, yielding information to include in a student’s IEP, teams found the strategies helpful in other situations, including: • Problem-solving inclusion support issues; • Planning for supports within a new general education curricular area; • Engaging students with disabilities to identify supports necessary for success in general education classrooms; and • Comprehensive planning for transition to a new setting or grade. A-3
  • 15. Preparing to Use the Supplementary Aids and Services Consideration Toolkit The Supplementary Aids and Services Consideration Tool is a structured method to analyze the instructional, physical, and social environment of a general education classroom from the perspective of an individual student. The intended outcome of using this tool is a list of environmentally-referenced Supplementary Aids and Services that enhance participation and learning for a student with a disability in the general education classroom. As illustrated in the table on page three, this use of this tool follows the completion of the Student Profile. Using the tools in this sequence provides a solid foundation of student-specific information upon which the steps described in the remainder of this document can build. Step 1: Develop Profile of General Education Classroom(s) A Classroom Profile is a compilation of information about the methods, materials, practices, and physical characteristics of a general education setting. The reference point for this activity is the general education classroom(s) that a student would participate in if he or she did not have a disability. While the identification of this setting is not difficult in some schools (e.g., small schools with one classroom at each grade level), the choice is not as straightforward in all settings. This requires flexibility in the approach to implementation. Which Setting(s)? • When classroom options are available, an initial comparison of the choices by the IEP team may result in the identification of one choice that represents the best match between a student’s needs, strengths, interests, and the instructional setting and classroom characteristics. It may be readily apparent, for example, that the number of students in a class, the physical layout or location of the classroom in the school building, the experience of a classroom teacher, and/or the presence of peers who know a student, make one classroom preferable to others. Narrowing down options initially will allow the team to proceed with the profile of a specific setting. • A similar approach may be useful at the secondary level, where curricular electives are available for all students. Initial information about setting options should be shared with the student and family to ensure their input in these class scheduling decisions. • If it is not possible to focus on a specific general education setting(s) prior to an IEP meeting, it will be necessary to think more globally about available options. Consider characteristics common to the potential choices (e.g., practices common to the three sections of 4th grade that available within the home school) when completing the profile. When a specific classroom is selected, the team can revisit the setting analysis, as necessary, adding more specific information to ensure alignment of the Supplementary Aids and Services with the instructional characteristics of this particular classroom. A-4
  • 16. Who Compiles the Information? The instructional, social, and physical environment of the classroom is best described by those individuals most familiar with daily practices in this setting. Therefore, the general education teacher(s) is most often the primary source of information for Step 1. Gathering information from the general educator can occur in several ways. • The special educator can collaboratively begin this step with the general educator either in advance of or during a team meeting. This is the preferred option for this information gathering. The information is then discussed with the entire team, providing a basis for the analysis required in Step 2. • When collaborative information-gathering options are not possible, the first column may be completed independently by general educator(s), sharing this information with the entire team as an initial “report” for further team discussion. A special educator or other professional who co-teaches in the general education classroom could also complete the environmental scan in Step 1 if they have sufficient knowledge of classroom practices. If this is the case, it is important to share the document with the general educator prior to the IEP meeting to make sure it is an accurate reflection of the classroom instructional environment before it is shared with the entire student team. • Time can be allocated for this activity at a team meeting, enabling the general educator to share information that will assist all team members in understanding the dynamics of the general education classroom. If this approach is taken, it is important to allocate sufficient team time for this to occur. Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Curricular Access and Instruction Comprehensive information about the student’s skills, learning characteristics, and priority needs is necessary in order to consider the instructional implications of classroom practices and routines for this individual student. Relevant student information may be found in the Evaluation Report, previous IEP documents, and/or progress reports. Parent input is essential to creating a comprehensive profile of the student as well as input from all other team members. In addition, student peers have been found to be valuable sources of instructionally relevant information. This information is summarized in the Student Profile, completed prior to beginning the consideration process. This information provides the basis for an analysis of potential discrepancies between what is occurring in the classroom, as reflected in the ratings compiled for various instructional practices produced in Step 1, and what is needed by the student to access instruction. The purpose of this analysis is to be proactive, responding to potential mismatches between a student and the instructional environment before actual problems occur. Selecting appropriate supports can eliminate or minimize the instructional impact of any mismatch between what and how a student learns, and prevailing practices in the general education classroom. A-5
  • 17. If this discussion is occurring during the development of the student’s IEP, it should be noted that this same information is needed to document a student’s strengths and needs, present level of performance, and current access to the general education curriculum. Step 3: Identify Strategies and Services to Eliminate Barriers It is critical that teams draw upon the broad base of available information about the student and effective strategies to support students with disabilities in general education classrooms. Teams that have limited experience with using a range of Supplementary Aids and Services to support inclusive placements must seek out the information, support and training that they need in order to develop program plans that are consistent with LRE principles. Therefore, identification of support strategies may necessitate: • Use of the Quick Guide to Supplementary Aids and Services and/or other information resources to identify available strategies and services to address a specific instructional mismatch. • Involvement of a consultant or resource person who is experienced in inclusive practices and specific support strategies (e.g., assistive technology, strategies for students with sensory limitations), providing an opportunity for job-embedded coaching during this program planning process. Teams have ready access to consultants from their Intermediate Unit and PaTTAN Educational Consultants. • Engaging peers in the problem-solving process of brainstorming and identifying support strategies. Step 4: Discuss Appropriate Supplementary Aids and Services Options and Identify Viable Alternatives for Implementation The team must identify the most appropriate Supplementary Aids and Services needed to support this student’s learning and participation in the general education setting(s) based on a careful consideration of the interaction between general education classroom characteristics and practices, individual student learning needs and characteristics, and potential strategies available to serve as an instructional scaffold for the student. This is also the time to identify the supports needed by adults to effectively implement the SaS that will be included in the student’s IEP. While many possibilities may have been generated during Step 3 of this process, the team must determine which combination of services and supports represents the most viable starting point for program implementation. Like other aspects of the student’s instructional program, ongoing evaluation and fine tuning is critical to the success of this process. • Progress monitoring, linked to the student’s IEP goals and objectives, will assist in determining the effectiveness of these supports. It is essential that desired student learning outcomes are clearly identified, serving as a consistent reference point as new instructional methods and supports are introduced. A-6
  • 18. • In some cases, a team may implement a support strategy, evaluate its effectiveness over time, and determine that it is not having the desired effect. If this occurs, information generated in Step 3 can be revisited, and other support options may be tried. Given this overview, the team is ready to proceed with implementation of the SaS Consideration Toolkit. References Brown, L., Branston-McClean, M. B., Baumgart, D., Vincent, L., Falvey, M., & Schroeder, J. (1979). Using the characteristics of current and subsequent least restrictive environments in the d evelopment of curricular content for severely handicapped students. AAESPH Review, 4(4), 407-424. Center for Applied Special Education Technology. (nd). Curriculum barriers tool. Retrieved online March 17, 2007 at http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/tools/curriculumbarrierstool.cfm. Etscheidt, S. K., & & Bartlett, L. (1999). The IDEA Amendments: A four-step approach for determining Supplementary Aids and Services. Exceptional Children, 65(2), 163-174. A-7
  • 19. B Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Consideration Toolkit COMPONENT B: Student Profile: Summary of Strengths, Needs and Learning Characteristics COMPONENT B assists teams in organizing student specific information in a format designated to facilitate instructional planning and problem-solving to support inclusive practices. --Review COMPONENT A prior to the use of any other SaS Toolkit components. --Refer to COMPONENT B throughout the use of the SaS Toolkit • The Supplementary Aids and Services Toolkit guides teams through steps that lead to the identification of services and supports to enable a student with a disability to learn and succeed within general education classroom settings. • The SaS Consideration Toolkit consists of five components that are packaged separately to facilitate ease of use. • PaTTAN and Intermediate Unit consultants have been trained in the use of these tools, and are available to provide on-site support to IEP teams as they become familiar with the process. PaTTAN/BSE/PDE Developed in Collaboration with Dr. Gail McGregor Version 1.3 September, 2008 B-1
  • 20. Using the SaS Toolkit Components A sequence is outlined to guide teams through the SAS Consideration Process. In practice, the use of the tools is an interactive rather than linear process, with two exceptions: • Learning about the use of the tool is a necessary first step • Creation of the student profile is a critical second step The remaining steps build upon this foundation. The entire process is summarized in the table below. Implementation Suggested Personnel Toolkit Component(s) Sequence Learn About the SaS Special education administrators, Overview and Consideration Toolkit PaTTAN and IU Technical Preparation for Use and Process Assistance personnel (TaC) serve as resources to IEP team Compile and organize All team members Student Profile information about the student Create profile of general General and special educator SaS Consideration Tool, education setting(s) compile information and share Step 1 with team Identify potential barriers All team members SaS Consideration Tool, to learning and Step 2 SAS Self Check curriculum access in the general education classroom Identify strategies and All team members; specialists as SaS Consideration Tool, services to eliminate needed to supplement team Step 3 barriers expertise (e.g., AT specialist, behavior specialist, PaTTAN/IU A Quick Guide to consultants) Supplementary Aids and Services Discuss and analyze appropriate SAS options All team members and consultants SaS Consideration Tool, and determine viable Step 4 alternatives for implementation B-2
  • 21. Student Profile: Summary of Strengths, Needs, and Learning Characteristics IEP teams use a variety of strategies to share information with each other as they begin the program planning process. For example, one person may summarize information shared during the team’s discussion by recording it on flip chart paper. Alternatively, a note taker may record information shared and compile it for team members as part of the meeting minutes. The tables that comprise this component of the SaS Consideration Toolkit provide a structure in which information shared to support program planning can be summarized and organized in a way that facilitates the identification of services and supports that are needed to support learning and curriculum access within the general education classroom for a student with a disability. Team members may be generating this information at different times/meetings, but the forms provided in this component of the Toolkit allow you to compile relevant information to guide your current discussion about supplementary aids and services. Directions for Use: This tool can be used as a recording format during team meetings, or as a tool to use after a meeting to synthesize information that has been shared by all team members. This document can then become a reference as teams begin to consider the instructional, social, and physical characteristics of a general education classroom in light of individual student needs. Student Name: Date: Student Strengths and Interests: What student interests can be used to support the instructional process? What are the student’s strengths? Strengths Interests B-3
  • 22. Sensory, Motor, and Processing Considerations: What, if any, sensory, motor, and processing characteristics of this student need to be considered when identifying instructional support needs? Vision Hearing Sensory Fine Motor Gross Motor Motor Receptive Expressive Processing Language/ Instructional Supports Needed Throughout the Day: What supports are necessary to help this student participate in routine activities throughout the day relative to the skills identified? Reading Writing Listening Behavior B-4
  • 23. Subject-Specific Information/Methods/Levels of Performance: It will be beneficial to compile this information prior to the on-site facilitation. Review the student’s current IEP and progress reports to complete the table below describing the student’s current level of performance relative to the general education curriculum. Compile information about strategies that have a track record of success with the student, as well as those that have not been effective. This information will be used by the team to identify supplementary aids and services that build upon previous “lessons learned” about how best to support this student in general education classrooms. Current Level of Performance Instructional Methods (Successful/Unsuccessful) Reading Math Writing Science Social Studies PE Art/Music B-5
  • 24. C Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Consideration Toolkit COMPONENT C: SaS Consideration Tool COMPONENT C is the tool that guides IEP team members through a four-step process and results in the identification of student-specific, environmentally-referenced Supplementary Aids and Services. --Review COMPONENT A prior to the use of any other SaS Toolkit components. --Refer to COMPONENT B throughout the use of the SaS Toolkit • The Supplementary Aids and Services Toolkit guides teams through steps that lead to the identification of services and supports to enable a student with a disability to learn and succeed within general education classroom settings. • The SaS Consideration Toolkit consists of five components that are packaged separately to facilitate ease of use. • PaTTAN and Intermediate Unit consultants have been trained in the use of these tools, and are available to provide on-site support to IEP teams as they become familiar with the process. PaTTAN/BSE/PDE Developed in Collaboration with Dr. Gail McGregor Version 1.3 September, 2008 C-1
  • 25. Using the SaS Toolkit Components A sequence is outlined to guide teams through the SaS Consideration Process. In practice, the use of the tools is an interactive rather than linear process, with two exceptions: • Learning about the use of the tool is a necessary first step • Creation of the student profile is a critical second step The remaining steps build upon this foundation. The entire process is summarized in the table below. Implementation Suggested Personnel Toolkit Component(s) Sequence Learn About the SaS Special education Overview and Preparation Consideration Toolkit and administrators, PaTTAN for Use Process and IU Technical Assistance personnel (TaC) serve as resources to IEP team Compile and organize All team members Student Profile information about the student SAS Self Check Create profile of general General and special SaS Consideration Tool, education setting(s) educator compile Step 1 information and share with team Identify potential barriers to All team members SaS Consideration Tool, learning and curriculum Step 2 access in the general education classroom Identify strategies and All team members; SaS Consideration Tool, services to eliminate barriers specialists as needed to Step 3 supplement team expertise (e.g., AT A Quick Guide To specialist, behavior Supplementary Aids and specialist, PaTTAN/IU Sevices consultants) Discuss and analyze appropriate SaS options and All team members and SaS Consideration Tool, determine viable alternatives consultants Step 4 for implementation C-2
  • 26. Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Consideration Tool Student: Date: Identify classroom(s) used as a reference point for Step 1: Completed By: Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers Step 1: Develop Profile of General Step 3: Identify Strategies and to Curricular Access and Education Classroom(s) Services to Eliminate Barriers Instruction Create a profile of the classroom environment(s) by Identify difficulties you can anticipate for Identify Supplementary Aids and Services to circling the number that best describes the this student if nothing is changed, based address potential barriers. Consider all frequency of use of identified materials and on his/her current skills, needs, and possibilities, consulting available resources instructional practices. learning style. and support personnel. 1.1 Instructional Method/ Materials Printed Materials Frequency of Use1 • Textbook 1 2 3 • Workbook 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Trade book 1 2 3 • Worksheets 1 2 3 • Newspapers/magazines 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ 1 2 3 C-3 1 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently
  • 27. Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Step 3: Identify Strategies and Step 1: Develop Profile of General Curricular Access and Services to Eliminate Education Classroom(s) Instruction Barriers Technology Frequency of Use • Computer 1 2 3 • Internet 1 2 3 1 2 3 • E-mail 1 2 3 • Instructional software 1 2 3 • Graphics software 1 2 3 • Printer/Scanner 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 Information Presentation Frequency Methods of Use • Chalk/White Board 1 2 3 • Smart Board 1 2 3 • Overheads 1 2 3 • Lecture 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Printed notes/outlines 1 2 3 • Handouts 1 2 3 • Videos/movies 1 2 3 • Graphic organizers 1 2 3 • Visual Supports 1 2 3 • Objects/Manipulatives 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 C-4 1 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently
  • 28. Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Step 3: Identify Strategies and Step 1: Develop Profile of General Curricular Access and Services to Eliminate Education Classroom(s) Instruction Barriers Student Assessment Formats Frequency of Use • Written tests 1 2 3 • Oral presentations 1 2 3 • Worksheets 1 2 3 • Narrative reports 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Performance tasks 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ Project/Presentation Formats Frequency of Use • Term paper/research project 1 2 3 • Group project 1 2 3 • Oral presentation 1 2 3 • Handwritten paper 1 2 3 • Typed paper 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Drawing/diagram 1 2 3 • Three-dimensional project 1 2 3 • Oral reading 1 2 3 • Graphic presentation 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ 1 2 3 • Other ____________________ C-5 1 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently
  • 29. Step 1: Develop Profile of General Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Step 3: Identify Strategies and Education Classroom(s) Curricular Access and Services to Eliminate Instruction Barriers 1.2 Instructional Delivery and Social Routines Instructional Format Prevalence of Practice • Small-group discussion 1 2 3 • Large group discussion 1 2 3 • Lecture 1 2 3 • Independent reading 1 2 3 • Individual seatwork 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Dyads/partner 1 2 3 • 1:1 instruction 1 2 3 • In-class assignment 1 2 3 • Note taking 1 2 3 • Homework 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ 1 2 3 • Other ___________________ Classroom Management Prevalence • Expected behaviors are of Practice identified and taught to students. 1 2 3 • Students are reinforced for meeting behavioral expectations. 1 2 3 • Appropriate behavior is modeled in this class 1 2 3 • A problem-solving approach is used to deal with issues. 1 2 3 • Students have the opportunity to identify and discuss concerns. 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 Other_____________________ 1 2 3 C-6 1 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently
  • 30. Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Step 3: Identify Strategies and Step 1: Develop Profile of General Curricular Access and Services to Eliminate Education Classroom(s) Instruction Barriers Response to Diversity Prevalence of Practice • Instructional activities 1 2 3 incorporate student interests and experiences • Students have opportunities to 1 2 3 make choices • Individual differences are seen 1 2 3 as positive • Respect and understanding of 1 2 3 difference is addressed in instructional activities • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ Interpersonal Relationships Prevalence of Practice • Students help each other 1 2 3 • Students treat each other with 1 2 3 respect • Social skills are taught 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ C-7 1 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently
  • 31. Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Step 3: Identify Strategies and Step 1: Develop Profile of General Curricular Access and Services to Eliminate Education Classroom(s) Instruction Barriers Social Activities Prevalence of Practice • The school offers activities that 1 2 3 address a range of student interests. • School sponsored activities are 1 2 3 publicized in a variety of ways to reach all students. • Extracurricular activities are 1 2 3 well attended by all students • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 • Other_____________________ 1 2 3 1.3 Setting Characteristics Classroom Environment Feature of this setting? • Classroom location is accessible Y N • Room arrangement allows for access to all areas • Room arrangement allows for Y N all students to see and hear instruction • Room arrangement allows for Y N teacher to see and monitor all students • Students have opportunity to Y N work without distraction Y N • Noise level of classroom does not interfere with learning Y N • Lighting in room is conducive to learning Y N • Other____________________ 1 C-8 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently
  • 32. Step 4: Discuss Appropriate Supplementary Aids and Services Options and Identify Viable Alternatives for Implementation. Based on the analysis of the general education classroom setting, identify those Supplementary Aids and Services that represent the team’s best thinking about the most appropriate services and strategies to support learning and participation in the general education setting. These decisions are likely to have resource/personnel/training and/or administrative support implications. This step in the consideration process focuses on the supports necessary for adults to effectively implement the Supplementary Aids and Services that have been identified. Student Support Strategies to Adult Supports/Resources for Supports for Implementation Implement Implementation (How we will get there?) (What does the student need?) (What do the adults need?) [Ex: Student needs visual supports used [Ex: Special educator needs access to [Ex: IU AT consultant will provide teacher throughout the day to understand schedule and Boardmaker software; training in use of software training; school will purchase software; tech individual activity demands.] needed.] coordinator will install on computer with access to color printer.] C-9
  • 33. D Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Consideration Toolkit COMPONENT D: Self-Check for Teams COMPONENT D is a self-assessment tool for teams to use as they move through the SaS Consideration Toolkit to ensure fidelity in the development of an IEP that is focused on maximizing student participation in the LRE and meaningful access to the general education curriculum. --Review COMPONENT A prior to the use of any other SaS Toolkit components. --Refer to COMPONENT B throughout the use of the SaS Toolkit • The Supplementary Aids and Services Toolkit guides teams through steps that lead to the identification of services and supports to enable a student with a disability to learn and succeed within general education classroom settings. • The SaS Consideration Toolkit consists of five components that are packaged separately to facilitate ease of use. • PaTTAN and Intermediate Unit consultants have been trained in the use of these tools, and are available to provide on-site support to IEP teams as they become familiar with the process. PaTTAN/BSE/PDE Developed in Collaboration with Dr. Gail McGregor Version 1.3 September, 2008 D-1
  • 34. Using the SaS Toolkit Components A sequence is outlined to guide teams through the SAS Consideration Process. In practice, the use of the tools is an interactive rather than linear process, with two exceptions: • Learning about the use of the tool is a necessary first step • Creation of the student profile is a critical second step The remaining steps build upon this foundation. The entire process is summarized in the table below. Implementation Suggested Personnel Toolkit Component(s) Sequence Learn About the SaS Special education administrators, Overview and Consideration Toolkit PaTTAN and IU Technical Preparation for Use and Process Assistance personnel (TaC) serve as resources to IEP team Compile and organize All team members Student Profile information about the student Create profile of general General and special educator SaS Consideration Tool, education setting(s) compile information and share Step 1 with team Identify potential barriers All team members SaS Consideration Tool, to learning and Step 2 SAS Self Check curriculum access in the general education classroom Identify strategies and All team members; specialists as SaS Consideration Tool, services to eliminate needed to supplement team Step 3 barriers expertise (e.g., AT specialist, behavior specialist, PaTTAN/IU A Quick Guide to consultants) Supplementary Aids and Services Discuss and analyze All team members and SaS Consideration Tool, appropriate SAS options consultants Step 4 and determine viable alternatives for implementation D-2
  • 35. Consideration of Supplementary Aids and Services: A Self-Check Tool for IEP Teams A set of questions, organized into sections based on when the actions should occur (e.g. before, during or after the IEP meeting), are presented below. As a team, review each statement at the appropriate time to ensure fidelity in the development of an IEP that is focused on maximizing student participation in the LRE and meaningful access to the general education curriculum. Please note: the “NA” choice is available for a limited number of items. The majority of items require a “yes” or “no” response. Before the IEP Meeting: Has the team gathered comprehensive Yes No NA information to guide program development that includes information from all stakeholders? 1. Parents were given the opportunity to identify preferences and priorities for their child’s program, and share information about strategies that have and have not been successful in previous years. 2. Information about the general education instructional, social, and physical environment was gathered from general educators and support personnel as a basis for team discussion of supports needed in general education classrooms (Step 1: SaS Consideration Tool). 3. Complete information about the student was available for the team to accurately describe the student’s present levels of educational performance in all academic and non-academic areas. 4. Instructionally relevant student information has been compiled and organized in the Student Profile format. (Part 3: Student Profile) 5. Data from previous year(s) were reviewed to identify what does and does not work well for the student, including strategies effective in promoting learning and participation in general education settings. D-3
  • 36. During the IEP Meeting: Has the IEP team used the general Yes No NA education classroom/curriculum as a reference point in developing this student’s program? 1. Priorities for this student are clearly identified, considering both academic and non-academic areas. 2. When functional skills are a priority, the team identifies when these skills can be taught within naturally occurring opportunities across the school day rather than limiting the scope of the IEP to these skill areas. 3. The team has discussed when and how individual student priorities can be addressed in the general education settings, ensuring sufficient instructional intensity for skill acquisition to occur. [Note: For some students, the use of an Activity Matrix can support this process.] 4. There is a clear relationship between IEP goals and objectives and Pennsylvania Academic and/or Alternate Standards, ensuring student access to the general education curriculum at an appropriate instructional level. 5. Descriptions of present levels of student performance have been used to identify discrepancies between student performance/behavior and grade level instruction/expectations. (Step 2: SaS Consideration Tool) 6. Skill differences lead to a discussion of Supplementary Aids and Services rather than alternative placements. (Step 3: SaS Consideration Tool) 7. The team has sought support/consultation about potential in-class services and approaches that enable instruction to be delivered in general education environments. 8. A wide array of potential Supplementary Aids and Services which address student-specific barriers to learning, have been identified to support participation in the general education classroom. (Step 3: SaS Consideration Tool) 9. Team discussion has led to the identification of those Supplementary Aids and Services that represent a comprehensive and sound approach to supporting participation in the general education classroom. (Step 4: Consideration Tool) D-4
  • 37. During the IEP Meeting: Has the IEP team used the general Yes No NA education classroom/curriculum as a reference point in developing this student’s program? 10. A support plan that encompasses prevention, teaching, and consequence strategies has been developed for this student, if behavioral challenges are a potential concern. 11. The IEP team’s decisions about Supplementary Aids and Services reflect an understanding of the legal obligation to supplement and realign resources as needed to avoid unnecessary removal of this student from the general education classroom. 12. Supplementary Aids and Services to support participation in nonacademic and extracurricular settings have been identified and documented on the IEP. 13. If placement outside of the general education classroom is required to address one or more of the students needs, the amount of time the student is educated elsewhere has been minimized. 14. The team has discussed resource personnel responsible and accountable for the support and implementation of IEP goals across educational environments. D-5
  • 38. After the IEP Meeting: Are sufficient plans in place to evaluate and Yes No NA refine the Supplementary Aids and Services plan? 1. A plan to ensure the availability of needed Supplementary Aids and Services has been developed and will receive needed administrative support for implementation. (Step 4: SaS Consideration Tool) 2. Arrangements have been made for school personnel to receive the necessary training and support to implement one or more of the identified Supplementary Aids and Services (e.g., Supports for School Personnel on the IEP) 3. A timeline has been established to periodically evaluate the effectiveness of Supplementary Aids and Services and to make necessary adjustments to the support plan. 4. Data are collected to evaluate the effectiveness of Supplementary Aids and Services to help guide the team in making any necessary adjustments to the support plan. 5. Proactive Problem-solving strategies are used by IEP team members to review and modify support plans when outcomes do not meet expectations established for performance to maintain the student in the current educational placement. D-6
  • 39. Settlement Agreement Gaskin v. Pennsylvania - Fact Sheet - Supplementary Aids and Services Definition and Purpose: “Supplementary aids and services means aids, services, and other supports that are provided in regular education classes, other education-related settings, and in extracurricular and nonacademic settings, to enable children with disabilities to be educated with nondisabled children to the maximum extent appropriate in accordance with §300.114 through §300.116.” (34 CFR 300.42) The purpose of providing supplementary aids and services is to support students with disabilities as active participants with nondisabled peers as well as to enable their access to the general curriculum. To that end, supplementary aids and services include modification to the general curriculum and [a child with a disability is not removed from education in age-appropriate regular classrooms solely because of needed modification in the general curriculum]. (34 CFR 300.116 (e)) Full Range of Supplementary Aids and Services 34 CFR 300.114 (ii) states that, “Special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs ONLY if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.” [emphasis added] Supplementary aids and services should be: Available to all students who need them Designed to provide meaningful educational benefit Provided in a manner that avoids stigmatizing students (Gaskin Settlement Agreement, 2005) There are an infinite number of possible supplementary aids and services to be considered and implemented by Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams. Court decisions have required school districts to make a concerted and good faith effort to use supplementary aids and services to address behavioral issues in the regular classroom. The provision of positive behavioral interventions, strategies, and supports is designed to foster increased participation of children with disabilities in regular education environments or other less restrictive environments, not to serve as a basis for placing children with disabilities in more restrictive settings. It is important that IEP teams contemplate educational placement in the regular education classroom not only as it currently exists, but also as it might be modified through the provision of supplementary aids and services. One framework that may assist IEP teams in considering the full range of supplementary aids and services includes four categories of supplementary aids and services for consideration: Collaborative, Instructional, Physical, and Social-Behavioral (Etscheidt & Bartlett, 1999). The chart that follows provides illustrative examples for each of the categories. The Oberti decision includes reference to four specific supplementary aids and services that Local Education Agencies (LEAs) must consider: modified curriculum, teacher training, effective behavior support, and provision of an aide, if necessary.
  • 40. Framework for Considering the Full Range of Supplementary Aids and Services (SAS) Category Examples • Scheduled time for co-planning and team meetings Collaborative • Instructional arrangements that support collaboration (e.g., - Adults working together to co-teaching, paraeducator support) support students • Professional development related to collaboration • Coaching and guided support for team members in the use of assistive technology for an individual student • Scheduled opportunities for parental collaboration • All school personnel collaborate in the development and delivery of SAS • Providing modified curricular goals Instructional • Providing alternate ways for students to demonstrate learning - development and delivery of • Providing test modification instruction that addresses • Providing alternate materials and/or assistive technology (e.g., diverse learning needs materials on tape, transcribe text into Braille, large print, alternate computer access) • Providing instruction on functional skills in the context of the typical routines in the regular classroom • Changing method of presentation • Using reader services • Providing research based supplementary materials • Providing instructional adaptations (e.g., pre-teaching, repeating directions, extra examples and non-examples) • Furniture arrangement in environments Physical • Specific seating arrangements - adaptations and modifications • Individualized desk, chair, etc. to the physical environment • Adaptive equipment • Adjustments to sensory input (e.g., light, sound, etc.) • Environmental Aids (e.g., classroom acoustics, heating, ventilation) • Structural Aids (e.g., wheelchair accessibility, trays, grab bars) • Social skills instruction Social-Behavioral • Counseling supports - supports and services to • Peer supports (e.g., facilitating friendships) increase appropriate behavior • Individualized behavior support plans and reduce disruptive or • Modification of rules and expectations interfering behavior • Cooperative learning strategies References Burns, Edward. (2003). A Handbook for Supplementary Aids and Services. Springfield, Ill: Charles C. Thomas. Etscheidt, S. and Bartlett, L. (1999). The IDEA Amendments: A Four Step Approach for Determining Supplementary Aids and Services. Exceptional Children, 163-74. December 2006 This fact sheet provides an overview of a topic related to obligations contained in the Gaskin Settlement Agreement and should not be relied upon as a complete understanding of the terms of the Settlement Agreement. View the entire Settlement Agreement at: www.pde.state.pa.us/special_edu/lib/special_edu/Settlement_Agreement.pdf. For more information for families and advocates of children with special needs, contact The Special Education ConsultLine: 1-800-879-2301 (Voice/TTY/TDD) or view additional information at: http://parent.pattan.net.
  • 41. serving all students with print disabilities & Tips for teaching learning wiTh Audiobooks RFB&D® is the recognized leader in providing tools and services to “level the playing field” for struggling readers and students with print disabilities. Educators in general, resource room, inclusion and self-contained classrooms have asked us about effective strategies for integrating audiobooks successfully in their classrooms. We’ve developed this Tip Sheet to give you and your colleagues some practical, proven approaches that will help your students bridge the achievement gap, access the total curriculum and succeed! Tip #1 Use audiobooks to teach and reinforce phonemic awareness and phonics skills: Audiobooks provide auditory reinforcement for newly introduced letters and sounds. We suggest you provide students with both the audio and print versions of textbooks and literature containing the letters and sounds. In introducing the lesson, connect the words with the letters and sounds you’re teaching. The print/audiobook combination works effectively in listening centers, whole class listening sessions and for students’ independent reading during free-choice reading times. Tip #2 Integrate audiobooks at all grade levels across the curriculum: Audiobooks give you great teaching flexibility. You can use them at the elementary, middle and high school levels with ease and simplicity. They also work well in any subject area in which students with print disabilities benefit from listening to learn. Listening while reading provides a multi-sensory reading experience and can eliminate some of the frustrations for students have difficulties with text-only materials. This chart will give you some specific integration insights: GrAde rAnGe i n T e G r AT i o n i n s i G h T s • use audiobooks during teachers’ read-aloud sessions. students get important auditory Elementary support and can practice independent reading. Grades • use audiobooks to augment the lessons and reinforce key concepts rather than simply “delivering” content. • Add audiobooks in the content areas, including math, science and social studies, when Middle content is more dense, difficult or complex. Grades • use audiobooks paired with print textbooks to help students build background knowledge and understand concepts. • use audiobooks to help students develop and strengthen their academic independence. • encourage students to listen to reading assignments and take notes, as they would with High text-only materials. School • help students develop test preparation strategies by repeating select audio sections and reviewing key points and concepts.
  • 42. Tip #3 Use audiobooks to build students’ critical thinking and listening skills: Students at all ages and ability levels will benefit by practicing several different types of listening and learning skills. • Provide a specific goal for listening: For example, ask your students to listen to pages 20-25 and write down the 3 places the main character visits. • Use a graphic organizer for students to complete during or after listening. Graphic organizers help students clarify and record their thoughts. • Pair students to take turns summarizing what they’ve listened to. Regroup the class and have students report on their partners’ summary. Tip #4 Use audiobooks to develop fluency and comprehension skills: fluency - Leading literacy experts report that listening to materials read aloud multiple times increases fluency. Listening and following along in the print version builds decoding skills and vocabulary that are essential for improving reading accuracy and rates: • Provide students with opportunities to access audio textbooks and literature multiple times throughout the learning day. • Suggest that parents purchase an RFB&D individual membership for students’ home use. Students can order the required textbooks for their classes and leisure reading. Added home use reinforces stronger fluency. Comprehension – Students with print disabilities often struggle when trying to attach meaning and understanding to the text they read. Audiobooks allow students to focus on the meaning rather than struggling with decoding. To help build comprehension: • Give students specific questions to answer after listening, so they “listen with a purpose.” • Have students make predictions based on what they’ve listened to. • Ask students to retell the story or concept to you after listening. Tip #5 Make audiobooks a standard part of your classroom management approach: Audiobooks fit flexibly into a wide range of instructional settings and approaches and they support a variety of activities and curriculum content. This chart will give you some additional integration insights: insTruCTionAl i n T e G r AT i o n i n s i G h T s seTTinG Whole Class • use audiobooks to introduce the entire class to a new piece of literature or nonfiction by Listening playing the audio version for all students. • Create an area in your classroom or library with the audio and print versions of text and Listening trade books, your rfb&d playback equipment and headphones. Centers • use listening centers for both assigned projects and reward or leisure listening. • play an audiobook during small group reading or study sessions. Small Group • replay text for students as needed and support others during listening to reinforce key Instruction concepts and skills. it’s a great way to maximize teacher time and individualize instruction. • Audio learners can access curriculum by listening at the same time as their peers. Individual • set up a listening or usage schedule with your audio learners to provide adequate reading Student Use and study time. For more information about Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic (RFB&D), contact our Membership Specialists at 800-503-0927. 20 Roszel Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 • 800-503-0927 • www.rfbd.org