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Hand Winding Historical Collectible Watches
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Hand Winding Historical Collectible Watches

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Hand Winding Historical Collectible Watches

Hand Winding Historical Collectible Watches

Published in: Lifestyle, Business

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  • 1. Hand Winding Historical Collectible Watches At the time of my fathers retirement he was awarded a gold watch from his employer of more than twenty years. The finely crafted Swiss watch contains 21 jeweled movement, meaning that the small cogs and gears inside the watch are perfectly crafted and aligned to produce a smooth and accurate movement as the hands on the face of the wristwatch keep time. After my father died I inherited his wristwatch that has to be wound by hand each 24 hours in order to keep running. Watch winders are wonderful pieces of engineering that wind a spring coil inside the watch, priming the gears. As the spring slowly uncoils the watch keeps time, but the watch must be wound up daily for it to continually keep accurate time. A couple of years ago I replaced the watch winder and bezel and added a new strap to the wristwatch after 30 years. I also own one of three pocket watches once owned by my great grandfather. This remarkable pocket watch requires two watch winders that are small keys which when inserted into the back of the watch wind the internal spring. One of the watch winders is for moving the hands on the dial while the other sets the spring and gears in motion. The old pocket watch still keeps time well, but occasionally sticks if the second hand catches on the minute hand. The pocket watch was made in England in the late 1880s from what I can determine by the watchmakers stamps that are engraved into the back of the stainless steel case. Midwest Diamond and Watch Company (http://diamondsandwatches.com) is a source of fine timepieces, diamonds and one of a kind designer jewelry. Specializing in high end low production timepieces such as Watchwinders from fine European companies such as Buben & Zorweg, andUnderwood. Billings Farnsworth is a freelance writer. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Billings_Farnsworth