The PomodoroTechnique“Take your day back”<br />Bent Jensen<br /> April 2011<br />
Why Pomodoro?<br />Francesco Cirillo invented the technique when he was a young student in the  80ies<br />He found it dif...
HvorforPomodoro?<br />Francesco Cirilloopfandtteknikkensomungstuderendei 80’erne<br />Han fandtdetsvært at fokuserepå at l...
Can you use it?<br />How often during a normal day do you experience being interrupted in your work?<br />Never!<br />1-5 ...
Can you use it?<br />When starting a larger, difficult task do you experience it is difficult to get started?<br />Never<b...
Er der brug for det her?<br />Oplever du nogengange at mødererufokuseredeogløber over tiden?<br />Aldrig<br />Nogengange<b...
Can you use it?<br />Do you experience that meetings lack focus and run over time?<br />Never<br />Some times<br />Often<b...
Goal<br />To achieve Stress-free, Fulfilling productivity<br />
Days where I wonder what I have done<br />Having to come in early or stay late to be able to at least get something done<b...
Agiludviklingogproduktivitet<br />Agiludviklingbeskytterteametsproduktivitetved at:<br />Timeboxe de flestemøder<br />Lukk...
Agile development and productivity<br />Agile development protects the teams productivity by:<br />Timeboxing most meeting...
Two cycles<br />24 hrs inner cycle<br />Outer cycle of not more than 2 weeks<br />
Makers time / managers time<br />
Threaths against personal productivity<br />The colocated team and high level of collaboration has some down-sides:<br />C...
A small experiment<br />
What is the problem?<br />
Cost of interruptions<br />A study says it consumes on average 28% of a knowledge -workers day*<br />May even be more when...
Focus or Concentration<br />Focus is necessary in much knowledge work<br />We need to be able to think and work with symbo...
Flow<br />Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi<br />
Motivation<br />Motivation<br />Optimal difficulty <br />Too difficult<br />Too easy<br />Difficulty<br />
Intrinsic motivation and rewards<br />When do you feel you have accomplished something?<br />Completing yet another Pomodo...
Pomodoro and flow<br />Establish the foundation for flow<br />Widen the range where flow can be experienced<br />Create re...
Procrastination<br />Tasks are too big, complex or difficult<br />We cannot get started<br />
Perception of time<br />Linear<br />Events<br />
Pomodoro<br />LIFO<br />BDUF<br />
The Pomodoro technique<br />Accessories<br />Timer<br />Activity Inventory Sheet<br />To Do Today Sheet<br />Recording She...
The Pomodoro Driven Day<br />Planning<br />Recording and Improving<br />
Planning<br />
Planning<br />
Planning<br />
Pomodoring<br />
Strategy for internal interruptions<br />Observe, Accept, Plan or Remove<br />In practice<br />Find out what it is and acc...
Strategy for external interruptions<br />Inform – I'm in the middle of something<br />Negotiate – is it OK if I come back ...
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Pomodoro teknikken apr 2011

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Pomodoro teknikken apr 2011

  1. 1. The PomodoroTechnique“Take your day back”<br />Bent Jensen<br /> April 2011<br />
  2. 2. Why Pomodoro?<br />Francesco Cirillo invented the technique when he was a young student in the 80ies<br />He found it difficult to focus on reading.<br />Challenged himself: Can I fokus just 25 minutes at the time?<br />
  3. 3. HvorforPomodoro?<br />Francesco Cirilloopfandtteknikkensomungstuderendei 80’erne<br />Han fandtdetsvært at fokuserepå at læse<br />Stillede sig selv en opgave: Kanjegfokusere bare 25 minutter ad gangen?<br />
  4. 4. Can you use it?<br />How often during a normal day do you experience being interrupted in your work?<br />Never!<br />1-5 times<br />5-10 times<br />10-25 times<br />More than 25<br />
  5. 5. Can you use it?<br />When starting a larger, difficult task do you experience it is difficult to get started?<br />Never<br />Some times<br />Often<br />Every time<br />
  6. 6. Er der brug for det her?<br />Oplever du nogengange at mødererufokuseredeogløber over tiden?<br />Aldrig<br />Nogengange<br />Ofte<br />Altid<br />
  7. 7. Can you use it?<br />Do you experience that meetings lack focus and run over time?<br />Never<br />Some times<br />Often<br />Always<br />
  8. 8. Goal<br />To achieve Stress-free, Fulfilling productivity<br />
  9. 9. Days where I wonder what I have done<br />Having to come in early or stay late to be able to at least get something done<br />X<br />
  10. 10. Agiludviklingogproduktivitet<br />Agiludviklingbeskytterteametsproduktivitetved at:<br />Timeboxe de flestemøder<br />Lukke for nyekravogændringerisprintet<br />Sikre at ingengårlængere end en dag udenhjælp<br />Men hvad med den enkeltesproduktivitet?<br />
  11. 11. Agile development and productivity<br />Agile development protects the teams productivity by:<br />Timeboxing most meetings<br />Close for new requirements and changes during the Sprint<br />Ensure that no-one goes for more than a day without help.<br />But what about the individual?<br />
  12. 12. Two cycles<br />24 hrs inner cycle<br />Outer cycle of not more than 2 weeks<br />
  13. 13. Makers time / managers time<br />
  14. 14. Threaths against personal productivity<br />The colocated team and high level of collaboration has some down-sides:<br />Constant interruptions<br />Involuntary involvement in discussions<br />Difficult to find time to deal with the”Big ones”<br />
  15. 15. A small experiment<br />
  16. 16. What is the problem?<br />
  17. 17.
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Cost of interruptions<br />A study says it consumes on average 28% of a knowledge -workers day*<br />May even be more when we consider intensive work like software development and -testing<br />A metaphor is that the brain is like a workbench where work is cheap but access to the attached storage is very expensive<br />* "The Cost of Not Paying Attention: How Interruptions Impact Knowledge Worker Productivity," Jonathan B. Spira and Joshua B. Feintuch, Basex, 2005)<br />
  31. 31. Focus or Concentration<br />Focus is necessary in much knowledge work<br />We need to be able to think and work with symbols for relatively long periods<br />Other words<br />Flow<br />Be in the Zone<br />Focus is fragile and is difficult to maintain<br />
  32. 32. Flow<br />Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi<br />
  33. 33. Motivation<br />Motivation<br />Optimal difficulty <br />Too difficult<br />Too easy<br />Difficulty<br />
  34. 34. Intrinsic motivation and rewards<br />When do you feel you have accomplished something?<br />Completing yet another Pomodoro creates a small intrinsic reward – even if the task is not fully completed<br />
  35. 35. Pomodoro and flow<br />Establish the foundation for flow<br />Widen the range where flow can be experienced<br />Create rewards for things that are not candidates for flow-experiences<br />
  36. 36. Procrastination<br />Tasks are too big, complex or difficult<br />We cannot get started<br />
  37. 37. Perception of time<br />Linear<br />Events<br />
  38. 38. Pomodoro<br />LIFO<br />BDUF<br />
  39. 39. The Pomodoro technique<br />Accessories<br />Timer<br />Activity Inventory Sheet<br />To Do Today Sheet<br />Recording Sheet<br />
  40. 40. The Pomodoro Driven Day<br />Planning<br />Recording and Improving<br />
  41. 41. Planning<br />
  42. 42. Planning<br />
  43. 43. Planning<br />
  44. 44. Pomodoring<br />
  45. 45. Strategy for internal interruptions<br />Observe, Accept, Plan or Remove<br />In practice<br />Find out what it is and accept it<br />Add to urgent and unplanned or inventory<br />Re-focus<br />Re-plan after the pomodoro<br />
  46. 46. Strategy for external interruptions<br />Inform – I'm in the middle of something<br />Negotiate – is it OK if I come back to you on Friday?<br />Schedule – I write the title of the activity down and later on, I plan it for a future Pomodoro<br />Call back – I do call back as I have promised, otherwise I will not be entrusted with this responsibility anymore<br />
  47. 47. Pomodoring<br />
  48. 48. Pomodoring<br />
  49. 49. Pomodoring<br />
  50. 50. Pomodoring<br />
  51. 51. Pomodoring<br />
  52. 52. Pomodoring<br />
  53. 53. Recording, reflecting<br />
  54. 54. Visualizing<br />
  55. 55. The Pomodoro Rhythm<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+20-30 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+20-30 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+20-30 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+5 m<br />+20-30 m<br />
  56. 56. Rules<br />The Pomodoro is indivisible<br />Choices<br />If there is 5-15 minutes left: Overlearn<br />If you have to do something else: Void it<br />Always remember: <br />The next Pomodoro will go better!<br />
  57. 57. Rules<br />If an activity is larger then approx. 7 Pomodoros – break it into smaller pieces<br />If an activity is less than a Pomodoro group it with other small activities<br />
  58. 58. Rules<br />The Break is a Break<br />Not an opportunity to do other work<br />
  59. 59. Benefits of Pomodoro<br /><ul><li>Overview:Planning in the start of the day
  60. 60. Small “guilt-free” breaks along the day
  61. 61. Motivation for routine tasks. Finishing a Pomodoro is a reward in itself
  62. 62. A way to handle procrastination: Wind up the clock and get started
  63. 63. A strategy for handling interruptions
  64. 64. A tool for continous improvement</li></li></ul><li>Applications<br />
  65. 65.
  66. 66. Pair Pomodoro<br />Control start and stop of focused activity<br />Review progress and strategy every 25 mins<br />
  67. 67. Meeting podoro<br />Agenda with duration in Pomodoros<br />Prevent drifting or long-winded talking<br />Necessary breaks to clear mind (and empty bladder)<br />
  68. 68. Team Pomodoro<br />Interruptions at controlled times<br />Trying once more<br />Protocol for what can interrupt an pomodoro<br />
  69. 69. What timer?<br />
  70. 70. Resources<br />http://blog.staffannoteberg.com/<br />http://www.pomodorotechnique.com/<br />
  71. 71.
  72. 72. BestBrains GHM & Workshops <br />Future GHM aboutKanban (writeyouemail for notification): ”Extending Scrum withKanban and Lean techniques”<br />More info onhttp://bestbrains.dk/dansk.aspx/Workshops<br />
  73. 73. Todo<br />What kind of timer<br />Picture of timers<br />Kinds of timers<br />Software<br />Hardware – electronic<br />Hardware - manual<br />Video<br />Sound file<br />More stats<br />Interruptions<br />Pomodorosvs hours<br />Kinds of pomodoros<br />
  74. 74. I replace “I must finish” with “Where can I start?” and I replace “This project is so big and<br />important” with “I can take one small step.” [NF06]<br />
  75. 75. Thoughts become famous inside your head. And just like pop stars, publicity increases the chances of<br />getting more publicity. By repeating an important conclusion, I increase the probability that I will recall<br />it at a proper time. [TB06]<br />
  76. 76. The strategy for handling external interruptions is a four stage rocket:<br />1. Inform – I'm in the middle of something<br />2. Negotiate – is it OK if I come back to you on Friday?<br />3. Schedule – I write the title of the activity down and later on, I plan it for a future Pomodoro<br />4. Call back – I do call back as I have promised, otherwise I will not be entrusted with this<br />responsibility anymore<br />
  77. 77. The strategy for dealing with internal interruptions is to Observe, Accept, and<br />Plan-or-Remove. I never switch activity in the middle of a Pomodoro. The rule says: “Once a Pomodoro<br />Begins, It Has to Ring.” Following my instincts can appear urgent. But, with a little distance I realize that<br />the box office will still be ready to answer my call if I chose to do it during my next Pomodoro – instead<br />of interrupting my current.<br />
  78. 78. Psychologist Edward Vul asked people various trivia questions. Without telling them, he repeated some<br />of the questions a moment later. He noticed then that on average, a person's combined answers were<br />more correct than either of her single guesses. Why? Cognition is based on statistical inference. Trying<br />to answer a trivia question creates a range of possible values in my head. Every time I answer, I<br />unconsciously just pick one of these values. The average of my answers is close to perfect but their<br />standard deviation is far from zero. [MB08]<br />

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