Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
How Early Intervention helps children & society
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

How Early Intervention helps children & society

915
views

Published on

Professor Frank Oberklaid, Director of the Centre for Community Child Health at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, shares a presentation about the evidence for early action/intervention. See …

Professor Frank Oberklaid, Director of the Centre for Community Child Health at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, shares a presentation about the evidence for early action/intervention. See also: www.rch.org/ccch and www.benevolent.org.au

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
915
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Professor Frank Oberklaid Director of the Centre for Community Child Health at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne The Evidence – how Early Intervention helps children & society
  • 2. Centre for Community Child Health What the research tells us • The early years of a child’s life are critical in impacting on a range of outcomes through the life course • The environment experienced by a young child literally sculpts the brain and establishes the trajectory for long term cognitive and social-emotional outcomes • If we want to improve outcomes in adult life we have to focus on the early years - this has profound implications for public policy • Investing in early childhood is a sound economic investment (‘the best investment society can make’)
  • 3. Centre for Community Child Health The neuroscience of brain development • Brain architecture and skills are built in a hierarchical ‘bottom-up’ sequence • Foundations important - higher level circuits are built on lower level circuits • Skills beget skills - the development of higher order skills is much more difficult if the lower level circuits are not wired properly • Plasticity of the brain decreases over time and brain circuits stabilise, so it is much harder to alter later • It is biologically and economically more efficient to get things right the first time
  • 4. Centre for Community Child Health Ability gaps open early in life ‘Ability gaps between advantaged and other children open up early before schooling begins. Conventional school based policies start too late to completely remedy early deficits, although they can do some good. Children who start ahead keep accelerating past their peers, widening the gap…Early advantages accumulate, so do early disadvantages… The best way to improve the schools is to improve the early environments of the children sent to them.’ (Heckman J. & Masterov DV, 2005)
  • 5. Centre for Community Child Health One in five Australian children arrive at school vulnerable in one or more areas of development!
  • 6. Centre for Community Child Health Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) • A population based measure which provides information about children’s health and wellbeing • 100+ questions covering 5 development domains considered important for success at school • Teachers complete the AEDI online for each child in their first year of full- time schooling • Results are provided at the postcode, suburb or school level and not interpreted for individual analysis
  • 7. Centre for Community Child Health Five AEDI ‘subscales’ The AEDI measures a child’s development in 5 areas: • physical health and well-being • social competence • emotional maturity • language and cognitive development • communication skills and general knowledge 5
  • 8. Centre for Community Child Health MARIBYRNONG Geographic Area, Victoria 5 km West of Melbourne Prepared by: AEDI National Support Centre, GIS Source: AEDI Communities Data 2005 Proportion of children vulnerable on one or more domains
  • 9. Centre for Community Child Health AEDI National Rollout 2009 Number of communities 660 Number of schools 7,423 % of schools completed 95.6% Number of teachers 15,528 Number of students 261,203 % of students completed 97.9%
  • 10. Centre for Community Child Health Key findings Percentage of children developmentally vulnerable (DV) across Australia by jurisdiction
  • 11. Centre for Community Child Health The importance of skills in the modern economy ‘Once a child falls behind, he or she is likely to remain behind. …. Impoverished early environments are powerful predictors of adult failure on a number of social and economic dimensions.’ (James Heckman, 2006)
  • 12. Centre for Community Child Health Adult problems with roots in early childhood • Mental health problems • Family violence and anti-social behaviour • Crime • Poor literacy • Chronic unemployment and welfare dependency • Substance abuse • Obesity • Cardiovascular disease • Diabetes
  • 13. Centre for Community Child Health Implications for policy Need for increased government expenditure to address these challenges But in the long term such policies • Are not sustainable - there will never be sufficient resources • Are often ineffective - treating established problems is difficult (and expensive) Better to get it right the first time
  • 14. Centre for Community Child Health Intervention effects and costs of social-emotional mental health problems over time - after Bricker Time High Low
  • 15. Centre for Community Child Health Developmental health - Aims Age
  • 16. Centre for Community Child Health Summary Promoting the healthy development of children is both an ethical imperative and a critical economic and social investment Our agenda for the 21st century has to be the application of science to policy and practice - to close the gap between what we know and what we do
  • 17. Centre for Community Child Health www.rch.org/ccch