High energy, low pollution

497 views
349 views

Published on

This was a keynote address presented to the International Uranium Conference in Perth, Western Australia on 11 June 2014. This address called for a dramatic change in approach from the uranium industry in the way view their business, focusing on the need for large scale clean energy in this century. For the presentation script please visit http://decarbonisesa.com/2014/06/11/actinide-age/ .

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
497
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Our every failure to deliver clean energy today loads our future with added risk of extreme climate disruption
  • 23 MW of capacity, against average daily load of 25 MW to produce just 28 TWh per year. Capacity factor of 13%
  • An investment of decades
  • 46 connections per minute for ten years
  • High energy, low pollution

    1. 1. High Energy, Low Pollution. Why we must bring forward the Actinide Age
    2. 2. I'm from Brisbane, Australia and I'm currently visiting India as part of a yoga course. The reason I'm emailing you, to be honest, is because I'm scared. Scared of what lies ahead for the future of our planet. I knew when visiting India that I would suffer some form of culture shock but in no way was I prepared for the air pollution. There is no escaping it forming a cloud over the entire country and out to sea. It is virtually a waste land. Callum, 18 March 2013
    3. 3. Why?
    4. 4. As of 2009, majority of Indians still use traditional fuels such as dried cow dung, agricultural wastes, and firewood as cooking fuel. (Atamand et al 2009)
    5. 5. Energykgoilequivalentcapita -1 Population,millionsofpeople Lo w in c o m e Lo w e r-m id d le in c o m e U p p e r m id d le in c o m e H ig h in c o m e 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 E n e rg y c o n su m p tio n p e r c a p ita P o p u la tio n Source: United Nations Population Division; World Bank (World Development Indictors)
    6. 6. Totalenergyconsumptionkgoilequivalent C h a d G u in e a -B is s a u P u e rto R ic o S u d a n N ic a ra g u a A lb a n ia In d o n e s ia B o ts w a n a M e x ic o C ro a tia B u lg a ria Ire la n d K o re a , R e p . N o rw a y U n ite d A ra b E m ira te s 0 2 .0 1 0 1 2 4 .0 1 0 1 2 6 .0 1 0 1 2 C u rre n t p o p u la tio n x c u rre n t p e r c a p ita e n e rg y c o n su m p tio n : E C S o u rc e : U n ite d N a tio n s P o p u la tio n D iv isio n ; W o rld B a n k (W o rld D e v e lo p m e n t In d ic a to rs); U n ite d N a tio n s S ta tistic s D iv isio n Totalenergyconsumptionkgoilequivalent C h a d G u in e a -B is s a u P u e rto R ic o S u d a n N ic a ra g u a A lb a n ia In d o n e s ia B o ts w a n a M e x ic o C ro a tia B u lg a ria Ire la n d K o re a , R e p . N o rw a y U n ite d A ra b E m ira te s 0 2 .0 1 0 1 2 4 .0 1 0 1 2 6 .0 1 0 1 2 C u rre n t p o p u la tio n x h ig h in c o m e p e r c a p ita e n e rg y c o n su m p tio n : E J S o u rc e : U n ite d N a tio n s P o p u la tio n D iv isio n ; W o rld B a n k (W o rld D e v e lo p m e n t In d ic a to rs); U n ite d N a tio n s S ta tistic s D iv isio n Totalenergyconsumptionkgoilequivalent C h a d G u in e a -B is s a u P u e rto R ic o S u d a n N ic a ra g u a A lb a n ia In d o n e s ia B o ts w a n a M e x ic o C ro a tia B u lg a ria Ire la n d K o re a , R e p . N o rw a y U n ite d A ra b E m ira te s 0 2 .0 1 0 1 2 4 .0 1 0 1 2 6 .0 1 0 1 2 2 0 5 0 p o p u la tio n x h ig h in c o m e p e r c a p ita e n e rg y c o n su m p tio n : E J S o u rc e : U n ite d N a tio n s P o p u la tio n D iv isio n ; W o rld B a n k (W o rld D e v e lo p m e n t In d ic a to rs); U n ite d N a tio n s S ta tistic s D iv isio n
    7. 7. Energykgoilequivalentcapita -1 E C E J E U J 0 1 .0 1 0 1 3 2 .0 1 0 1 3 3 .0 1 0 1 3 4 .0 1 0 1 3 5 .0 1 0 1 3 > 2 x E C > 3 x E C Source: United Nations Population Division; World Bank (World Development Indictors)
    8. 8. 82 % Fossil 10 % Biofuels and other waste 5 % Nuclear 2 % Hydro1 % Other S o u rc e : IE A W o rld E n e rg y S ta tis tic s 2 0 1 3 C o a l O il G a s
    9. 9. Today’s horror… In 2012 • Household air pollution: 4.3 million deaths (cooking smoke) • Ambient air pollution: 3.7 million deaths The world’s “single highest health risk” (World Health Organisation 2014)
    10. 10. … and tomorrow’s hazard Source: IPCC WGIII AR5 2014
    11. 11. “Global temperature increases of ~4°C or more above late-20th-century levels, combined with increasing food demand, would pose large risks to food security globally and regionally” (high confidence). Source: IPCC WGII AR5 2014
    12. 12. HIGH ENERGY LOW POLLUTION DECARBONISED
    13. 13. EnergydensityasheatvalueGJt -1 F ire w o o d C o a l O il L iq u id g a s 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 Source: World Energy Council 2013 (conversion factors)
    14. 14. “Ash from the burnt biomass is assumed to be returned to the agricultural land to avoid long-term nutrient depletion of the soils on which the crops are grown”. (Turner, Elliston et al. 2013)
    15. 15. “We examined …planting of 5% of cleared farmland (~ 2.4 Mha) by 2030, and extension of the area to 10% (~ 4.8 Mha) by 2050”. (Crawford, Jovanovic et al. 2012, CSIRO Energy Transformed Flagship)
    16. 16. Energykgoilequivalentcapita -1 Population,billionsofpeople L e a s t d e v e lo p e d c o u n trie s L o w in c o m e L o w e r-m id d le in c o m e U p p e r m id d le in c o m e H ig h in c o m e 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 E n e rg y p e r c a p ita P o p u la tio n
    17. 17. “Basic”, “Modern” or…?
    18. 18. “There could be considerable interim benefits from starting non-electrified households on a low-capacity supply for certain hours of the day as a step towards a longer-term solution.” (The Secretary General's Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change 2010) In the ten years to 2000, there were 240 million new household connections to electricity. This will continue to 2030. (The Secretary General's Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change 2010)
    19. 19. High Energy Low Pollution Decarbonised Desalination Transport Electrification Agricultural intensification Synthetic Fuels Materials recovery Reforestation
    20. 20. EnergydensityasheatvalueGJt -1 F ire w o o d C o a l O il L iq u id g a s 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 EnergydensityasheatvalueGJt -1 F ire w o o d C o a l O il L iq u id g a s U ra n iu m (L W R ) 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Source: World Energy Council 2013 (conversion factors)

    ×