Origins andDocumentedAccounts of              By: Christina Ratelle,  Healing     Debra Crumb, Jesse              Brown, L...
Outline:1. Legends2. Origins ofEagle Dance Legends3. Comparative Choreography4. The Onondoga Condor Dance5. Eagle Dance/Do...
Legends•   The Legend of the Bloody Hand•   The Two Brothers Learn Songs from Birds•   Chipping Sparrows Adventure among E...
The Legend of the Bloody Handhttp://trishtarver.edu.glogster.com/early-texans/http://resonanttruth.com/2011/08/blue-eagle-...
The Two Brothers Learn Songs from Birds      http://sunsite.utk.edu/pisl/photos/photos/00328000.jpg
Chipping Sparrows Adventure Among                     Eagleshttp://neelamspoetry.blogspot.com/2010/10/things-that-havent-b...
Origin Legend of the Eagle Dance•   There are many variants to the origin of the Eagle Dance•   parents told their childre...
A boy became lost in the woods http://farm1.static.flickr.com/36/82036638_2e7723f42a.jpg
He was sleep and he crawled into a hollow log to sleep       http://www.thepracticalnapper.com/2010/11/jack-handey-on-napp...
Dew Eagle picked                                                                                      up the log and      ...
The boy awoke and peered out of the log and saw the earth receding far belowhttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/_DPCSd1DIHig/TAgTnjw-...
Dew Eagle used the log for her nesthttp://www.nicolasdory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/2010_05_29_BaldEagle_6178.jpg
The boy would crawl out and play with the eaglets whilethe great bird was out hunting.                          http://us....
The eaglets grew                                                             up.http://www.wildnatureimages.com/Baby_Bald_...
One grew big enough for him to mount on its back. It flewout and returned. It was so strong that he had to have aclub to h...
These birds were supposed to roam above the clouds and nevercome down toward the earth.                           http://b...
The boy returned to earth by beating the young eagle on thehead...
...and he related his adventure among the birds who dwell abovethe clouds amid high crags in heaven, how among them helear...
Main Differences Among the Abductor Legends•   Version of DjidqGwas•   Version of Chauncey Warrior•   Version of the Snore...
Discussion 1:What do these stories have in common?
Discussion 1:What do these stories have in common?• Learning songs, dances or teachings from  an Eagle (or some species of...
Discussion 2:What are the differences in the stories? Arethese differences important?
What are the differences in the stories?Are these differences important?•   Traditions are passed down verbally so there a...
Discussion 3:Does anyone know any other legends that isthe basis for tradition in their culture?
An Analysis of the IroquoisEagle Dance and Songs:ComparativeChoreography
Onondaga Private Ritual•   Males play priest, gift custodian, patient, dancers,    conductor, singer, and more•   Women, c...
Public ritual at Cayuga Sour Springs Longhouse  •   only includes the body, part II  •   typical moiety grouping Interlong...
The Dance:    Three Tribal Variants
Postures of dancers.1. lunge, arms out to side 2. lunge, arms out in back3. lunge, arms forward 5. hop 6. hop (Onondagapri...
Postures of dancers4. lunge, right arm forward 7. knee twist 8. eagledancer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnR1bKTF3jg&feature=relstart at 1:15http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v
Gestures and Steps•   Dance choreographies are considered paradigms    because even though dancers follow the same    form...
The Onondaga Condor Dance
The Onondaga Reservation                                                 http-//www.peacecouncil.net/NOON/images/maps/Onon...
Handsome Lake (Peacemaker) Religion      http-//www.myhero.com/images/Peacemaker/Lake/g1_u5548_handsomelake
The Condor Dancehttp-//www.indymedia.org.nz/sites/default/files/files/images/eagle.truth_love_justice_BELOVED_EARTH       ...
Equipment1. Indian tobacco2. 12 packages of chewing tobacco3. Hulled white corn soup4. Chicken5. Feather fan6. Cowhorn Rat...
Membershipo   Through sickness and cure by the ritualo   Through dreamso   A fortune teller had told them to joinPreparati...
Moeity PatternThey of the Mudhouse   They of the Longhouse- Eel                  - Turtle- Bear                 - Beaver  ...
Ritual Pattern   http-//www.thecircusblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Hopi-Condor-Dance-1024x649
The Iroquois Eagle Dance as a    Cultural Phenomenon
 IroquoisEagle Dance permits free expression of  personality within set forms Community distribution coincides with the ...
Membership Includes both sexes Members have had a dream of a specific type, or have been cured by the society The socie...
Ritual  Perform a ritual which is addressed to a  species of eagles that wheel in flight high in  the heavens amid clouds...
Ritual Pairs  of youths/men hold a rattle in the right  hand and feather fan in the left, crouch  swaying and advance to ...
Ritual Recites  personal achievement, humorous  anecdote or ridicules himself or another, then  distributes presents to h...
A Century of Ethnology L.H. Morgan, 1851, conducted 10 years of field work among the descendants of the tribes that forme...
Ethnology: L.H. Morgan  Ga-na-un-da-doh: Scalp Dance or Shaking a  bird’s tail Shaking-a-fan is the Tonawanda name for  ...
Ethnology: L.H. Morgan  To hold a Medicine Lodge was to observe theirhighest religious rites, and to practice their highes...
Ethnology: E.A. Smith Erminnie  A. Smith, 1883 went among the  Seneca of western New York First to mention the Eagle Dance
Ethnology: E.A. SmithPrivate dances are held by the medicine men, in which are introduced Ka-nai-kaw-ai, or eagle   dance…...
Ethnology: E.A. Smith  Private dances are not infrequently given   by individual members of the tribe who,   having concei...
Ethnology: Rev. W.M.Beauchamp Rev.     Wiliam M. Beauchamp, 1895, on the Ondondaga at Syracuse
Ethnology: Rev. W.M.BeauchampEagle dance (striking stick dance). Two men danceside by side in precisely the same way. Each...
Ethnology: E. Parker Ely Parker, 1913, wrote the first consistent  account of Seneca Medicine Societies Served as a guid...
Ethnology: E. ParkerThe ritual of the Eagle Society consists of ten    songs and a dance… Every member   participating in ...
Ethnology: E. Parker   It is believed that the society holds in its songs the most potent charms known. It is      said th...
Conclusion     http-//newsfornatives.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/native_ceremonial_eagle_dancer
Questions?
Eagle Dance Presentation
Eagle Dance Presentation
Eagle Dance Presentation
Eagle Dance Presentation
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Eagle Dance Presentation

  1. 1. Origins andDocumentedAccounts of By: Christina Ratelle, Healing Debra Crumb, Jesse Brown, LaurenCeremonies Reurink & Pam Moore
  2. 2. Outline:1. Legends2. Origins ofEagle Dance Legends3. Comparative Choreography4. The Onondoga Condor Dance5. Eagle Dance/Documentation6. Conclusion7. Questions
  3. 3. Legends• The Legend of the Bloody Hand• The Two Brothers Learn Songs from Birds• Chipping Sparrows Adventure among Eagles• Boy Abducted by Dew Eagle
  4. 4. The Legend of the Bloody Handhttp://trishtarver.edu.glogster.com/early-texans/http://resonanttruth.com/2011/08/blue-eagle-wavespell-march-14-26-2010/eagle-feather/
  5. 5. The Two Brothers Learn Songs from Birds http://sunsite.utk.edu/pisl/photos/photos/00328000.jpg
  6. 6. Chipping Sparrows Adventure Among Eagleshttp://neelamspoetry.blogspot.com/2010/10/things-that-havent-been-done-before.html
  7. 7. Origin Legend of the Eagle Dance• There are many variants to the origin of the Eagle Dance• parents told their children that they would be carried away• William Finley states that such cases are false• nevertheless these stories appear in the public press http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-stretched-canvas-real/eagle-carrying-little-girl-karl-addison.jpg
  8. 8. A boy became lost in the woods http://farm1.static.flickr.com/36/82036638_2e7723f42a.jpg
  9. 9. He was sleep and he crawled into a hollow log to sleep http://www.thepracticalnapper.com/2010/11/jack-handey-on-napping-in-log.html
  10. 10. Dew Eagle picked up the log and carried it aloft to the crags where it nests.http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_kyPhEiYq2tM/Sbij9NOk0zI/AAAAAAAABkc/CH3p58b_XUs/s400/Animal+World+in+Color+1969+eagle+and+child+Svenhil
  11. 11. The boy awoke and peered out of the log and saw the earth receding far belowhttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/_DPCSd1DIHig/TAgTnjw-RcI/AAAAAAAACs4/OFbTq77UhDA/s1600/View+from+Turtle+Mountain.jpg
  12. 12. Dew Eagle used the log for her nesthttp://www.nicolasdory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/2010_05_29_BaldEagle_6178.jpg
  13. 13. The boy would crawl out and play with the eaglets whilethe great bird was out hunting. http://us.acidcow.com/pics/20110408/cute_baby_eagles_06.jpg
  14. 14. The eaglets grew up.http://www.wildnatureimages.com/Baby_Bald_Eagle_Photos.htm
  15. 15. One grew big enough for him to mount on its back. It flewout and returned. It was so strong that he had to have aclub to hit it on the head to weaken it. He had something forthe club. As the bird flew higher, he would strike it. It felltowards the earth. As it recovered, it flew higher. Now andagain he whacked it. It would fall.
  16. 16. These birds were supposed to roam above the clouds and nevercome down toward the earth. http://blog.triggerlappy.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/eagle.jpg
  17. 17. The boy returned to earth by beating the young eagle on thehead...
  18. 18. ...and he related his adventure among the birds who dwell abovethe clouds amid high crags in heaven, how among them helearned the Eagle Dance. http://www.unhcr.org/thumb1/4e92ee2b6.jpg
  19. 19. Main Differences Among the Abductor Legends• Version of DjidqGwas• Version of Chauncey Warrior• Version of the Snorer• Tonawanda Variant• Grand River Variant• The Bad Boy and the Giant Crow• Gahgagona Abducts a Hunter
  20. 20. Discussion 1:What do these stories have in common?
  21. 21. Discussion 1:What do these stories have in common?• Learning songs, dances or teachings from an Eagle (or some species of bird)• Main character is usually a hunter - connection to nature• Returns to village and teaches their own people the songs and dances• Some legends have an overarching lesson
  22. 22. Discussion 2:What are the differences in the stories? Arethese differences important?
  23. 23. What are the differences in the stories?Are these differences important?• Traditions are passed down verbally so there are always small details included or left out• The dances and songs vary from group to group• The lessons taught are different (ex. cured of illness, remember to thank Creator)• Differences are important because each individual variation has a personal meaning• Each group has different interpretations of the stories
  24. 24. Discussion 3:Does anyone know any other legends that isthe basis for tradition in their culture?
  25. 25. An Analysis of the IroquoisEagle Dance and Songs:ComparativeChoreography
  26. 26. Onondaga Private Ritual• Males play priest, gift custodian, patient, dancers, conductor, singer, and more• Women, children, and Whites watched or slept as they lounged on the beds• three generations participated from two families, the Logans and the Skyes• Logans dominated the ritual in three roles of intercession with the supernatural, intermediary b/w communicants and personification of the Eagle spirit, no one in costume
  27. 27. Public ritual at Cayuga Sour Springs Longhouse • only includes the body, part II • typical moiety grouping Interlonghouse comparisons • Seneca uses moiety arrangements where Onondaga uses grouping • Tonawanda has two chants, allegany has three • Logans: Robert utter the cry then two boys in response (unlike all the dancers of six nations) • Six nations speeches fulfill the Iroquois fondness for jokes and clowning • Seneca speakers interrupt song and pass the cane in rotation, where the Seneca and Onondaga wait till the end of the song and follow no fixed order • Ground plan is always the same within tribes, no matter the dancer
  28. 28. The Dance: Three Tribal Variants
  29. 29. Postures of dancers.1. lunge, arms out to side 2. lunge, arms out in back3. lunge, arms forward 5. hop 6. hop (Onondagaprivate ritual)
  30. 30. Postures of dancers4. lunge, right arm forward 7. knee twist 8. eagledancer
  31. 31. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnR1bKTF3jg&feature=relstart at 1:15http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v
  32. 32. Gestures and Steps• Dance choreographies are considered paradigms because even though dancers follow the same format, it can never be perfectly replicated each timeLonghouse variations The beat of the rattles are played at different tempos in each tribe to accomodate the agility of the dancers or other needsIndividual variations • Small variations in hand or leg placement are insignificant • Other variations in the dance can affect the expressiveness and beauty, i.e. vibrant vs droopy wings (arms)
  33. 33. The Onondaga Condor Dance
  34. 34. The Onondaga Reservation http-//www.peacecouncil.net/NOON/images/maps/OnondagaTerritory&NYShttp-//www.iroquoismuseum.org/images/onondaga2
  35. 35. Handsome Lake (Peacemaker) Religion http-//www.myhero.com/images/Peacemaker/Lake/g1_u5548_handsomelake
  36. 36. The Condor Dancehttp-//www.indymedia.org.nz/sites/default/files/files/images/eagle.truth_love_justice_BELOVED_EARTH http-//static.desktopnexus.com/thumbnails/271790-bigthumbnail
  37. 37. Equipment1. Indian tobacco2. 12 packages of chewing tobacco3. Hulled white corn soup4. Chicken5. Feather fan6. Cowhorn Rattle7. Stick http-//www.myhero.com/images/Peacemaker/Lake/g1_u5842_IROQUOISMONTAGE1
  38. 38. Membershipo Through sickness and cure by the ritualo Through dreamso A fortune teller had told them to joinPreparationo Refer to page 70
  39. 39. Moeity PatternThey of the Mudhouse They of the Longhouse- Eel - Turtle- Bear - Beaver - Wolf- Deer - Snipe- Hawk
  40. 40. Ritual Pattern http-//www.thecircusblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Hopi-Condor-Dance-1024x649
  41. 41. The Iroquois Eagle Dance as a Cultural Phenomenon
  42. 42.  IroquoisEagle Dance permits free expression of personality within set forms Community distribution coincides with the Handsome Lake Religion Communities: Coldspring on the Allegheny River, Newtown on Cataragus Reservation, Tonawanda Reservation, Onondaga near Syracuse, Onondaga and Caygua communities at Six Nations Reserve, Ontario
  43. 43. Membership Includes both sexes Members have had a dream of a specific type, or have been cured by the society The society calls itself ‘the strikers’ or ‘the medicine company’
  44. 44. Ritual Perform a ritual which is addressed to a species of eagles that wheel in flight high in the heavens amid clouds, have the power to restore life to wilting things Song leader with a water drum and his helpers with horn rattles, accompany a singular dance
  45. 45. Ritual Pairs of youths/men hold a rattle in the right hand and feather fan in the left, crouch swaying and advance to pick up objects in their mouths, and retreat hopping, End of song, a speaker strikes a pole and interrupts the ritual to praise his host and/or dancers
  46. 46. Ritual Recites personal achievement, humorous anecdote or ridicules himself or another, then distributes presents to his victims Following the dance, the MC passes an animal head or a chicken among the guests, who cry like brows and bite at it
  47. 47. A Century of Ethnology L.H. Morgan, 1851, conducted 10 years of field work among the descendants of the tribes that formed the Iroquois Confederacy Devoted little space to the meetings of medicine societies and referred to them only as ‘concerts’ saying nothing of their imputed medicinal power
  48. 48. Ethnology: L.H. Morgan Ga-na-un-da-doh: Scalp Dance or Shaking a bird’s tail Shaking-a-fan is the Tonawanda name for the Eagle or Bird Dance Calumet Dance Pipe Dance War Dance
  49. 49. Ethnology: L.H. Morgan To hold a Medicine Lodge was to observe theirhighest religious rites, and to practice their highest religious mysteries. ( Morgan, 1877, p 97)Particular dances are special property, belonging either to a gens or to a society organized for itsmaintenance into which new members were from time to time initiated. (Morgan, 1877, p 118)
  50. 50. Ethnology: E.A. Smith Erminnie A. Smith, 1883 went among the Seneca of western New York First to mention the Eagle Dance
  51. 51. Ethnology: E.A. SmithPrivate dances are held by the medicine men, in which are introduced Ka-nai-kaw-ai, or eagle dance… On the death of a medicine man a special meeting is held by his fraternity, andduring the giving of certain medicines, medicine tunes are chanted. ( Smith, 1883, p. 116)
  52. 52. Ethnology: E.A. Smith Private dances are not infrequently given by individual members of the tribe who, having conceived a great affection for each other, publicly cement it by afriendship dance. (Ibid. Cf. Stone, 1838, vol. 1, p. 28)
  53. 53. Ethnology: Rev. W.M.Beauchamp Rev. Wiliam M. Beauchamp, 1895, on the Ondondaga at Syracuse
  54. 54. Ethnology: Rev. W.M.BeauchampEagle dance (striking stick dance). Two men danceside by side in precisely the same way. Each holdsa stick, with feathers spread out on each side. They bend down, bending on leg under the dance, and stretching the other out on the side. A cent is placed on the flood and picked up with the mouth. Some strike on the floor with a stick, and this gives it the name (Ha-na-gah-a). A dancer makes a speech and presents tobacco. (Beauchamp, 1895 a, p. 212)
  55. 55. Ethnology: E. Parker Ely Parker, 1913, wrote the first consistent account of Seneca Medicine Societies Served as a guide in gathering more information
  56. 56. Ethnology: E. ParkerThe ritual of the Eagle Society consists of ten songs and a dance… Every member participating in the ceremony pains on each cheek a round red spot. No one but members may engage in its ceremonies, even though these be performed publicly. The Eagle Society’s ceremony is regarded the most sacred, is this respect next to the Great Feather Dance (Parker, 1913 b, pp. 124-125)
  57. 57. Ethnology: E. Parker It is believed that the society holds in its songs the most potent charms known. It is said that the dying, especially those afflicted with wasting diseases, and oldpeople, have been completely restored by its ceremonies. This is because the Dew Eagle, to which the society is dedicated, isthe reviver of wilting things. (Parker, 1913 b, p 124)
  58. 58. Conclusion http-//newsfornatives.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/native_ceremonial_eagle_dancer
  59. 59. Questions?

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