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Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
Photography Club Part 1
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Photography Club Part 1

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Transcript

  • 1. PHOTOGRAPHY CLUBTaught by Michael Bennett
  • 2. WEEK 1THE HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
  • 3. Our Pinhole CameraWEEK 1In the first week of our photography club, we were looking at the history of photography. We started looking at early models of cameras, such as the pinhole camera. In the lesson, we made our own; it is effectively a light proof box with a small hole on the side. Light from the area will pass through this small hole, providing an inverted image on the other side of the box. The pinhole camera is very simple to make, however has one major disadvantage, the lengthy exposure time, generally taking several hours. We then looked at other previous models of cameras including one of Mr Bennett’s older cameras.
  • 4. WEEK 1After the invention of new camera models, photography began to grow rapidly in popularity. A very popular usage of photography was the Carte de Visite, it was a small family portrait mounted on stiff card. Studios opened all over the UK offering to produce Carte de Visites for individual families. The new technology also allowed war to be photographed. In fact photography became so powerful, that it was used to change the publics opinion on events. A famous example of this is Nick Ut’s picture (shown above) of children burned by the Napalm bomb dropped by America. The photo had a huge impact on public opinion in the US.
  • 5. WEEK 1We then looked at some of the best photographers and their works from the last century. Central Park Zoo Gary Winograd 1975
  • 6. WEEK 1 Le baiser de l’Hotel de Ville Robert Doisneau 1950
  • 7. WEEK 1 Unnamed (Featured in a collection) Robert Frank 1952
  • 8. WEEK 1At the end of the lesson, we were set a short homework, to photograph as many eyes as we could, to get a feel for our camera. I collaged mine, and they are displayed below.
  • 9. 2APERTURE ANDDEPTH OF FIELD
  • 10. WEEK 2In the second week of photography club, we were taught some basic photography terms such as adjustable camera and automatic exposure. However the two main terms that we focussed on were aperture and depth of field. Aperture: The size of the Depth of Field: is the opening on a camera lens is distance between the measured using aperture, nearest and farthest the larger the opening, the objects in a particular smaller the aperture. Most scene that appear sharp in lenses have a range of the image. I.e., the amount around f2.8 to f16. of a subject that is in focus.We then researched the terms and looked at some of the examples provided.
  • 11. WEEK 2 – EXAMPLES
  • 12. WEEK 2We learnt that a large aperture lets in lots of light but gives a shallow depth of field, but a small aperture lets in much less light but gives an extended depth of field. So the larger the aperture, the shallower the depth of field. In the examples on the next slides, you can see that the first photograph has a smaller aperture meaning less of the image is in focus. This is a useful technique when wanting to focus on the subject of the image. However in most cases the larger aperture is preferred, such as in the second picture, where both the subject and background are wanted in the image.
  • 13. A smaller aperture means less ofWEEK 2 the image is in focus
  • 14. Whereas a higher aperture meansWEEK 2 more of the image is in focus

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