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Design principles - Technology in the classroom
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Design principles - Technology in the classroom

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Teachers need to base technology lessons on design principles. When creating and selecting media for the classroom it is appropriate to follow some well thought out guidelines. Scott McCloud's 5 …

Teachers need to base technology lessons on design principles. When creating and selecting media for the classroom it is appropriate to follow some well thought out guidelines. Scott McCloud's 5 principles lend themselves well to media in the classroom.

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  • 1. Introduction• As we introduce and use digital media in our classrooms we need to pay attention to design principles• as we create media• when we select media• when we use media• It is all about CLARITY.
  • 2. Scott McCloud• Scott McCloud is a comic artist• He has written books to teach others how to create successful comics• He was the comic artist for Google when his comics prepared the way for the new browser Chrome.• He believes good design comes down to 5 choices: Focus,Frame,Image, Word, Flow
  • 3. Focus• What exactly do you want to teach?• What is the focus of the lesson, the image, the text, the presentation?• What do you want your students to know at the end of the session? The presentation?• Is your message clear at the start?• What can you leave out?
  • 4. Frame• What is your angle?• Are you focussing on detail and complexity or is it a general overview and contextualisation?• Is it inclusive?• Where are the boundaries for today?• Where does this lesson fit in with the rest of your narrative?
  • 5. Image• Are your images inclusive?• Do you want your images to teach a subtext?• Are the images crystal clear?• What kind of atmosphere are you setting?• Are your images able to contribute to visual literacy?
  • 6. Word• What register are you using and why?• Are you using words which will convey meaning to students?• Do you need to include clarification of terms?• Are you preventing misconceptions?• Are you captioning when and where you can?
  • 7. Flow• Are you showing how one thing leads to another?• Are you showing how this connects to prior knowledge, life, the world, other subjects?• Have you explained which part of the picture you are in at the moment and where that can lead?• Are you making connections with what you have taught and what comes next?
  • 8. Resources• A photographer’s frame of mind• Literacy Today• A rhetoric of sequential art• 30 graphic novels in 30 days
  • 9. Acknowledgements• Microsoft Office 2010• Templateswise.com• Scott McCloud• @sally07 January 2013