Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Cruise ship industry
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Cruise ship industry

2,607

Published on

Published in: Travel, Business
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,607
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
190
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. TO CRUISE or NOT TO CRUISE what are the disadvantage and advantages if a cruise ship vacation list the disadvantage and advantages of a taking cruise ship for vacation. Group 1 – Disadvantages and Group 2 – Advantages. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 1
  2. CRUISE SHIP INDUSTRY Different Sectors of TOURISM Principles of Tourism II. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 2
  3. Objective: At the end of the session, the student shall be able to: 1. Explain the profile of cruise ship industry 2. Explain the classification of cruise ships 3. Enumerate the different facilities in cruise ship 4. Review the ferries in the Philippines and 5. Provide an over view of the career opportunities in cruise ship 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 3
  4. Industry Profile Cruise ships in this era serve as floating vacation liners. A cruise ship or cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ship's amenities are a part of the experience, as well as the different destinations along the way. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 4
  5. Industry Profile Cruising has become a major part of the tourism industry, accounting for U.S.$29.4 billion with over 19 million passengers carried worldwide in 2011. The industry's rapid growth has seen nine or more newly built ships catering to a North American clientele added every year since 2001, as well as others servicing European clientele. Smaller markets, such as the AsiaPacific region, are generally serviced by older ships. These are displaced by new ships in the high growth areas. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 5
  6. Industry history Historically, ships have been an integral part of human civilization; they have part of the discovery of nations, commerce, and migration. Ships have been used in traveling throughout the ages. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 6
  7. Industry history 1900 ‘s in this era transatlantic voyages were introduce for travel and trade. During this time, ocean liners were expensive and only the wealthy can afford to travel first class, majority of passengers who cannot afford first class travel were assigned to the steerage class. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 7
  8. Industry history 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 8
  9. Industry history The decline of the popularity of water transport was brought about by the introduction of commercial airplanes. However, the cruise industry flourished again with the introduction of leisure travel. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 9
  10. Industry history 1990 ‘s The industry’s popularity reached new height’s with the introduction of mega ships in 1990’s Cruise ships repositioned themselves by offering leisure activities to their passengers. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 10
  11. Market Perspective Motives why people cruise A cruise is a stress-free and hassle-free vacation. It provides new experience to vacationers as this differs from their usual vacation habits. Cruises offer different activities inside the ship, such as swimming, jogging, shows, and other recreational activities. Cruise facilitate socialization and networking. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 11
  12. Market Perspective Motives why people cruise A cruise is ideal for special occasions, like honeymoons, anniversaries, and rekindling and renewing of relationship. A cruise provides a brief overview of historical and earning experiences from one port to another. A cruise package price is generally all inclusive. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 12
  13. Key Operating Concept. CLIA – Cruise Lines International Association. - One of the biggest organizations in the industry of cruise lines. - The organization aims to promote and develop the cruise ship industry by abiding with the Federal Commission under the shipping Act of 1984. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 13
  14. Key Operating Concept. CLIA member Cruise Lines AMA Waterways MSC Cruises American Cruise Lines Norwegian Cruise Line Azamara Cruise Oceania Cruises Carnival Cruise Lines Pearl Seas Cruises Celebrity Cruises Princess Cruises Costa Cruises Regent Seven seas Cruises Crystal Cruises Royal Caribbean International Cunard Line Seabourn Cruise Line Disney Cruise Line Seadream Yacht Cub Holland American Line Silversea Cruise Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorMajestic America Line Faye B. Lagman Uniworld River Cruises 11/20/2013 14
  15. Cruise ship Classification SIZE CAPACITY Small cruise ships usually hold no more than a few hundred people. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman FACILITIES generally offer less amenities but are also less crowded. 15
  16. Cruise ship Classification SIZE LARGE CRUISE SHIPS 11/20/2013 CAPACITY FACILITIES 850 to 3,000 passengers Restaurants Arcades Shopping Casinos, libraries, and spas Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 16
  17. Cruise ship Classification SIZE CAPACITY MEGA CRUISE SHIPS 3,000 to 5,000 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman FACILITIES Restaurants Arcades Shopping Casinos, libraries, spas ice-skating rinks and museums 17
  18. Ocean Liners vs. Cruise Ships Cruise ships and ocean liners are really two very different types of vessel. OCEAN LINERS Ocean liners came first. Built for the open ocean routes. Designed to transport passengers from point A to point B. Have storage for more food, water, and fuel than their cruise ship counterparts, and are built for the rougher waters of the open ocean. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 18
  19. Ocean Liners vs. Cruise Ships Cruise ships and ocean liners are really two very different types of vessel. OCEAN LINERS They typically have more freeboard than cruise ships, which simply means their highest open-air deck is higher off the water than that on a cruise ship. This makes an ocean liner a lot more expensive to build than a cruise ship. Their bows are long and tapered to allow them to cut through the waves. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 19
  20. Ocean Liners vs. Cruise Ships Cruise ships and ocean liners are really two very different types of vessel. Cruise ships have become destinations in and of themselves. cruise ships don't have a final destination. built for the purpose of taking passengers on a journey that begins and ends in the same port. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 20
  21. Cruise Ship Facilities. Cruise ship facilities and spaces can be divided into three types. 1. STATEROOM SPACE 2. PRIVATE SPACE 3. PUBLIC SPACE. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 21
  22. Cruise Ship Facilities. 1. STATEROOM – or a cabin ( like a hotel guest room). - usually extremely compact but all spaces are well utilized to answer guest’s needs. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 22
  23. Cruise Ship Facilities. 1. STATEROOM – 3 TYPES OF SHIPS STATEROOMS: A. Outside Stateroom - are meant for guests who may have preference for an ocean view. B. Inside Stateroom - are cheaper than outside staterooms since they do not have windows. C. Suites – are the most expensive rooms on a ship. Today, suites in cruise ships maybe comparable to land based hotel. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 23
  24. Cruise Ship Facilities. 2. PRIVATE SPACES – - are reserved for the ship’s personnel. This include the crews cabins, cafeteria, gym, and recreational facilities, the bridge is where the vessel is controlled, the galley or kitchen and machine areas. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 24
  25. Cruise Ship Facilities. 3. PUBLIC SPACES – B. Dining Room – Similar to the food and beverage outlets typical in land-based hotel. C. Show Room – serves as the ships venue for entertainment and business functions. D. Pool Area – E. Gym, Spa and Sports Facilities F. Children’s Area 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 25
  26. Cruise Ship Facilities. 3. PUBLIC SPACES – G. Gift Shop – H. Clinic – I. Internet CenterJ. Casino Operations. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 26
  27. Philippine Setting Ferries in the Philippines Cebu Ferries – a sister company of the Super Cat and Super Ferry which are all subsidiary of Aboitiz Group. Negros Navigation – considered the oldest shipping line in the Philippines. It was established on July 26, 1932. Super Ferry – the second largest shipping company in the Philippines. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 27
  28. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 28
  29. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 29
  30. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 30
  31. Career Opportunities Hotel Manager - Ensures that all hotel operations on the ship are properly implemented. Purser (Front Desk Personnel) – in charge in all phases of guest stay Crew Purser – handles crew issues. Hotel purser – the one who tends to passenger matters. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 31
  32. Career Opportunities Shore excursion manager - orchestrates the operation and booking of port-based packages. Cruise Director – provides the guests with onboard activities and entertainment. Executive chef manager – oversee that food sanitation and safety is being implemented in all facets of the food preparation cycle. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 32
  33. Career Opportunities Head Housekeeper – manages the sanitation of all staterooms, pubic spaces, and private spaces. Food & Beverage Manager – oversees the dining team for proper and quality service. Chief Radio or Communication Officer – oversses in-room satellite TV programming, ship to shore phone calls, internet service and other communication system 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 33
  34. WORLD BEST CRUISE SHIP 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 34
  35. DISNEY MAGIC Ranking: #1 in Top 20 Large Cruise Ships Category: Large Passengers: 2713 Number of cabins: 877 Number of cabins with balconies: 362 Smallest cabin, in square feet: 184 Number of swimming pools: 3 Number of restaurants: 8 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 35
  36. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 36
  37. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 37
  38. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 38
  39. Disney Wonder Ranking: #2 in Top 20 Large Cruise Ships Category: Large Passengers: 2713 Number of cabins: 877 Number of cabins with balconies: 362 Smallest cabin, in square feet: 184 Number of swimming pools: 3 Number of restaurants: 8 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 39
  40. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 40
  41. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 41
  42. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 42
  43. Disney Dream Ranking: #3 in Top 20 Large Cruise Ships Category: Large Passengers: 4000 Number of cabins: 1250 Number of cabins with balconies: 901 Smallest cabin, in square feet: 169 Number of swimming pools: 3 Number of restaurants: 9 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 43
  44. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 44
  45. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 45
  46. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 46
  47. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 47
  48. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 48
  49. CELEBRITY ECLIPSE Ranking: #4 in Top 20 Large Cruise Ships Category: Large Passengers: 2850 Number of cabins: 1426 Number of cabins with balconies: 1212 Smallest cabin, in square feet: 176 Number of swimming pools: 3 Number of restaurants: 10 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 49
  50. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 50
  51. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 51
  52. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 52
  53. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 53
  54. CELEBRITY EQUINOX Ranking: #4 in Top 20 Large Cruise Ships Category: Large Passengers: 2850 Number of cabins: 1426 Number of cabins with balconies: 1212 Smallest cabin, in square feet: 176 Number of swimming pools: 3 Number of restaurants: 10 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 54
  55. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 55
  56. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 56
  57. Queen Mary 2 Cunard Ranking: #6 in Top 20 Large Cruise Ships Category: Large Passengers: 2620 Number of cabins: 1296 Number of cabins with balconies: 955 Smallest cabin, in square feet: 194 Number of swimming pools: 5 Number of restaurants: 8 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 57
  58. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 58
  59. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 59
  60. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 60
  61. 11/20/2013 Principles of Tourism 2 - InstructorFaye B. Lagman 61

×