Becoming a "tweet"cher
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Presentation given to faculty in a College setting regarding potential classroom and professional uses of twitter.

Presentation given to faculty in a College setting regarding potential classroom and professional uses of twitter.

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  • Social Media - defined as applications whereby users can be both consumers and creators or contentPearson’s Social Media Survey – April 201190%Use Social Media – career or in classroom67%Use Social Media during a class session30%Posted content for students to read outside of class40%Incorporated social media into an assignment80%Some type of online video use
  • Social Media - defined as applications whereby users can be both consumers and creators or contentPearson’s Social Media Survey – April 201190%Use Social Media – career or in classroom67%Use Social Media during a class session30%Posted content for students to read outside of class40%Incorporated social media into an assignment80%Some type of online video use
  • Social Media - defined as applications whereby users can be both consumers and creators or contentPearson’s Social Media Survey – April 201190%Use Social Media – career or in classroom67%Use Social Media during a class session30%Posted content for students to read outside of class40%Incorporated social media into an assignment80%Some type of online video use
  • Social Media - defined as applications whereby users can be both consumers and creators or contentPearson’s Social Media Survey – April 201190%Use Social Media – career or in classroom67%Use Social Media during a class session30%Posted content for students to read outside of class40%Incorporated social media into an assignment80%Some type of online video use
  • Social Media - defined as applications whereby users can be both consumers and creators or contentPearson’s Social Media Survey – April 201190%Use Social Media – career or in classroom67%Use Social Media during a class session30%Posted content for students to read outside of class40%Incorporated social media into an assignment80%Some type of online video use
  • Pearson’s Survey – TwitterVirtually all faculty surveyed were aware of twitterSlightly over 10% had actually visited twitter in the past monthJust over half of those postedTwitter use for professional purposes was slightly more than personal use, a minority post daily.Online instructors almost twice as likely to use twitter than traditional instructorsTwitter use for classroom purposes – relatively constant use across the purposes (all approximately 2-3% of respondents).In-class useAssigned students to read/review Posted content for classAssigned students to postFaculty see considerable value in some social media, especially for collaborative learning:Online video, podcasts, wikis and blogs“Negative” value for Facebook & twitter
  • Pearson’s Survey – TwitterVirtually all faculty surveyed were aware of twitterSlightly over 10% had actually visited twitter in the past monthJust over half of those postedTwitter use for professional purposes was slightly more than personal use, a minority post daily.Online instructors almost twice as likely to use twitter than traditional instructorsTwitter use for classroom purposes – relatively constant use across the purposes (all approximately 2-3% of respondents).In-class useAssigned students to read/review Posted content for classAssigned students to postFaculty see considerable value in some social media, especially for collaborative learning:Online video, podcasts, wikis and blogs“Negative” value for Facebook & twitter
  • Pearson’s Survey – TwitterVirtually all faculty surveyed were aware of twitterSlightly over 10% had actually visited twitter in the past monthJust over half of those postedTwitter use for professional purposes was slightly more than personal use, a minority post daily.Online instructors almost twice as likely to use twitter than traditional instructorsTwitter use for classroom purposes – relatively constant use across the purposes (all approximately 2-3% of respondents).In-class useAssigned students to read/review Posted content for classAssigned students to postFaculty see considerable value in some social media, especially for collaborative learning:Online video, podcasts, wikis and blogs“Negative” value for Facebook & twitter
  • As a Backchannel for comments / questions during lectures, videos or other presentations.Increases engagementIncreases participation rates among shy studentsUsed extensively at conferences and events such as graduation – everyone in the moment.Can be very useful in large classes. Project on a screen if possible so all can see it. Creates a live discussion forum.Can be challenging if student post inappropriate comments... Same as for in-class!Classroom management still an issue – need to consider how you will respond (or not) to inappropriate or off topic tweets. Need to clearly articulate as learners may take over the backchannel and hold “votes”. Users recommend selective use of the backchannel – not everyday and not for the entire class.
  • For just-in-time questions & answers regarding assignments or course content.Keep students engaged beyond the classroom walls – post a question (photo, link or video feed) on twitter as part of homework – students reply to post and reply to others.Remind about upcoming due dates or assignmentsCreating a poll using polleverywhere, students can tweet (or text) their responses to poll questions.Check for understanding with a quick twiter questionsUse twitter when students are working in groups. No need to interrupt with questions or comments, all can be done via tweets. One person designated in the group to follow the tweets to keep the rest of the group informed. Hashtags can be created for each project / discussion to more easily track and archive the discussion.Language teachers use twitter by asking everyday question and students need to respond to in the new language.Professor needs to have structure to the discussion if using twitter.Shout out to your PLN to respond to a questions you or students want to ask – gather real world data
  • Using twitter to create social presence is particularly effective for online courses. Students and faculty alike have fewer informal conversations and encounters than typically occurs with on-campus students. Twitter can be used to improve social presence so learners get to know their teachers as “real people” beyond their formal discussion that may take place within the LMS.Twitter can serve as a retention tool.
  • The ability to write both public and private posts enables users to target their posts to a particular audience. If your audience is your students, you write for them, but if it is to a general audience, then you likely tailor your comments accordingly. A direct message can be sent as a private message to someone you follow.Students can also gain an appreciation for what is appropriate to post publicly and what should only privately be shared.
  • Teachers are often critical of the informal writing style that is common on twitter. The 140 character limit forces writers to be concise yet use the syntax and styles that are acceptable in this forum as professional and experts also use twitter extensively. It is important for students to learn how to engage appropriately using the informal writing acceptable in this forum. Educators too need to come to grips with that acceptance of “twitter speak” on twitter and engage in it appropriately themselves.
  • Engaging students on twitter also introduces them to professional they can follow as well as professional conversations about a theme (hashtag). There are many conversations hosted on twitter by experts in their fields. For example Jane Hart hosts a #lrnchat on a regular basis.Start with textbook authors or other experts in the field, foundations or organizations that are important in the field. Even following the College related users such as online support, alumni, etc. If you are teaching an English class, follow the authors of the texts if possible – may be possible to pose questions to the author to engage in the book study.Professors have used it for journalism students to connect with story sources, medical personnel have provided twitter updates on surgeries – families can stay up to date.Use tools like twitterfall to monitor geotags or conversations. Use twittermap to see where the comments are coming from.Many ngo, causes and charities have twitter feeds. If related to the course, find an event or cause that the class can follow and encourage students to get involved. They can reflect on their experiences.Through twitter, educators have connected with experts around the world and global projects. In some cases, this has led to others teaching a class session (via web conference or skype) and participating in global wikis.Follow different newsfeeds – how do the various news bodies report the same events? Any biases?Follow users related to the career goals. Identify any trends that pop up along the way.
  • The informal learning community in twitter allows for others to contribute to the learning environment. Students can also engage in critical thinking and practice evaluating the credibility of such sources, thus enhancing their digital literacy skills.Track memes / themes – hashtags for topics of interest
  • You may decide to stop following students when the course is over, but may also embrace the opportunity to change roles from teacher / instructor to advisor and coach. You have to opportunity to continue to watch students grow professionally and academically.
  • Collaboration can begin with a simple writing a story one tweet at a time. (Tweetstory) Tweet the story prompt out to the network and use twitterfall to watch the stories unfold. Students choose a story to edit into a coherent whole. Twitter is a great tool for communication between collaborative partners. It is easy to share links and photos via twitter. Think of a field trip whereby student take pictures of objects and tweet the photo along with questions or thought regarding the photo itself (identifying flora, fauna or architecture, various photos of world leaders, photos of world sites, etc.) Where Am I – game of Denise’s.www.Historicaltweets.com – what would historical characters say in 140 characters or less. Have students create their own.Collect class views or opinions via dummy accounts @topic1. Have students tweet comments about that topic over the term/module. Compile tweets into a class website / blog.Use twitter to collaborate on assignments rather than an email trail.
  • Twitter can be addicting and time consuming and some believe contributes to bad grammar.
  • Twitter is free but depending on data plans, may be costly for texting and data charges if used on mobile devices – wifi is free.
  • Getting startedCreate an accountFollow some folks – authors of your textbooks, experts in your discipline, people you’ve heard at conferences, co-workers, company users, friends, etc.Re-Tweet some of the resources or comments you like to either select people who follow you or to all who follow you. Add a comment before you re-tweet such as “gr8 idea” or “yes” or add a short question – remember only 140 characters!Expose yourself – begin by sharing links to resources you find on a daily basis to your followers. If you use a tool with your class, tweet about your experience – good or bad! Your followers may be able to help!Tag your tweet Add a few education related hashtags to have others to see your comment and to follow you. Lists of educational hashtags are available to help you narrow down the audience.Before beginning to use twitter with students, educators are encouraged to become familiar with the tool and twitter support tools such as hootsuite or tweetdeck.  By building or expanding their existing personal learning network (pln), instructors can demonstrate the value of twitter as an informal educational tool as well as ways to connect with the professional communities - a 21 century skill. Miller (2010) suggests that educators start by:Creating an accountFollowing some people - start building your pln by following experts in the field, co-workers, people you've heard present at conferences, etc.Begin re-tweeting (RT) some of the tweets you receive from those you follow. Start adding a comment to the re-tweet.Expose yourself - start sharing the links and resources you find everyday and your experiences.Start adding hashtags to your tweets so more people will see what you wrote.  More people will begin to follow you.What do you tweet about?  Angela Maiers shared her formula of 70:20:10.  She recommends 70% of your twitter activity is to share other opinions, resources and tools, 20% are directly responding, collaborating, and co-creating with other twitter users, and 10% chit chat about your life as a human being. (LInk to Angela's blog) 
  • If you want to become a networked teacher, here is a model that may help you determine what tools you already use and where you may want to build networks.
  • http://www.hypebot.com/hypebot/2011/08/10-top-twitter-tools-used-by-social-media-experts.html

Transcript

  • 1. Becoming a “Tweet”cher Bow Valley College Faculty Association: GIFTS Session October 2011 @bechardl LinkedIn
  • 2. Plan• Pearson Education April 2011 Survey• Strategies - Using Twitter with students• Personal Learning Network
  • 3. 90% Social Media Creative commons by miss604
  • 4. 67% Social Media Creative commons by miss604
  • 5. 30% Social Media Creative commons by miss604
  • 6. 40% Social Media Creative commons by miss604
  • 7. 80% Social Media Creative commons by miss604
  • 8. Awareness
  • 9. Visited in past month
  • 10. Posted
  • 11. With Students
  • 12. Backchannel
  • 13. Just-in-time Q&A By iprole (Royalty Free)
  • 14. Creating Social Presence By krayker (Royalty Free)
  • 15. Writing for an Audience
  • 16. WritingConcisely
  • 17. Connecting with a Professional Community By johnnyberg (Royalty Free)
  • 18. Supports informal learning By mwookie (Royalty Free)
  • 19. Maintain aRelationship By: steved_np3 (Royalty Free)
  • 20. SupportsCollaborative Learning
  • 21. What do opponents say?
  • 22. TimeConsuming By bjearwicke (Royalty Free)
  • 23. Cost – is it really…. By ba1969 (Royalty Free)
  • 24. Develop your PLN
  • 25. Where to start?• Develop your own Personal Learning Network(PLN)
  • 26. Creative commons By Divergent Learner
  • 27. Creative commons by courosa
  • 28. Miscellaneous
  • 29. Twitter tools• Bit.ly or tiny url - URL shortening• Paper.li – collect top tweets from your followers and create newspaper like style as a summary• Hootsuite – twitter management• Tweetdeck – desktop application provides functionality to shorten URLS, follow various conversations and provides a way to use more than 140 characters.• Twitterfeed – through RSS feeds allows you to automatically share feeds from blogs (yours and others)• Visibli –create a custom sharing bar so views can easily share with other sites
  • 30. ReferencesDunlap, J. C., & Lowenthal, P. R. (2009). Tweeting the night away: Using Twitter to enhance social presence. Journal of Information Systems Education, 20(2), 129- 135. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.Ferriter, B. (2009). Taking the digital plunge. Educational Leadership, 67(1) Retrieved from http://www.ascd.orgKISS Metrics. (2011). Top 10 Twitter tools used by social media experts. Retrieved fromhttp://www.hypebot.com/hypebot/2011/08/10-top-twitter-tools-used-by-social- media-experts.htmlMiller, S. (2005). 50 ways to use twitter in the classroom. Retrieved from http://www.universityreviewsonline.com/2005/10/50-ways-to-use-twitter-in-the- classroom.htmlMiller, S. (2010). Enhance Your Twitter Experience. Learning & Leading with Technology, 37(8), 14-17. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.Newgarden, K. (2009). Twitter. The Electronic Journal for English as a Second Language, 13(2) Retrieved from EBSCOhostParry, D. (2008). Twitter for Academia. Retrieved from http://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/2008/twitter-for-academia/
  • 31. Wikis WordPress Twitter Google Flickr SlideSharedelicious YouTube Diigo