Low Impact & Infill Development Applications

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SAWS & Bexas Regional Watershed Management Low Impact & Infill Development Applications.

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Low Impact & Infill Development Applications

  1. 1. LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT AND INFILL DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS INFILL DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT AUGUST 10TH AND 31ST, 2012 Suzanne B. Scott SARA General Manager
  2. 2. “States report that nonpoint source pollution is the leading remaining cause of water quality problems.” EPA http://www.epa.gov/owow_keep/NPS/whatis.html2
  3. 3. In 2020, San Antonio’s natural resources and environmental sustainability strategy “is based on an integrated approach that establishes a green economy and focuses on three key areas”: ●Water ●Energy ●Land: “Development practices are focused on Smart Growth, Low Impact Development and Green Building.” SA 2020, City of San Antonio, March 19, 20113
  4. 4. LAND USES THAT REDUCE RUNOFFSlow It Down, Spread It Out, Soak It In ● Low Impact Development (LID) ● Green Infrastructure (GI) ● Water Harvesting ● Structural BMPs Tucson, AZ
  5. 5. LID● Matches pre-development hydrology (on-site management of stormwater)● Does not alter downstream and instream flow conditions● Addresses stormwater quality and quantity issuesGreen roof and permeable surfaces slow downand reduce rainfall runoff at a James Madison Rain garden and curb cuts capture,High School Agriscience Magnet Program slow, and polish street runoff; may bebuilding in San Antonio paired with under drain to convey 5 larger flows after polishing first-flush
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  7. 7. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE (GI) Networks of multi-functional open spaces, including ●formal parks ●gardens ●woodlands ●green corridors ●waterways ●street trees ●open countryside Plan for it and link it, as with gray infrastructure.7
  8. 8. WATER HARVESTING • Reduces runoff • Provides first-flush polishing of roof water • Can be used to irrigate plantings8
  9. 9. LID AND STRUCTURAL BMPS Pueblo. Porous pavers and a collection system below the parking lot http://urbanlandscapes.info/2010/05/03/low-impact-development-xeriscape-shouldnt-they- be-a-prerequisite-in-the-southwest/ Tree Box Filter http://www.lid‐stormwater.net/treeboxfilter_home.htm9
  10. 10. TREATMENT TRAIN10
  11. 11. LID IN URBANIZED AREASUrban sprawl consumes green space and promotesauto dependency.●Smart growth strategies are designed to reconfiguredevelopment in a more eco-efficient and communityoriented style.● LID addresses many of the environmental practices that are essential to smart growth strategies including the conservation of open green space.11 http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/green/
  12. 12. LID IN URBANIZED AREAS● LID is compatible and often paired with complete streets; often utilizes portions of excess right of way.● LID provides opportunities to retrofit existing highly urbanized areas with pollution controls. http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Low+Impact+Development+Images&qpvt=Low+Impact+Development+Images&FORM=IGRE;12
  13. 13. LID IN URBANIZED AREAS● Stormwater can easily be directed into rain barrels and vegetated areas in high- density urban areas.● Urban areas may design bioretention systems into parking lots with little or no reduction in parking space.● Vegetated rooftops and permeable pavements reduce impervious cover in highly urbanized areas.13
  14. 14. LID IN URBANIZED AREAS● LID can be adapted to a variety of lot sizes.● Pairing structural BMPs with LID may be needed to achieve watershed objectives.● LID effectiveness depends on site conditions and is not based strictly on space limitations.● Soil permeability, slope and water table depth must be considered in LID design. http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Low+Impact+Development+Photos&view=detail&id=18D 0C65F88FECD7D79ED18FA085E9B2B2E958861&first=10614 http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/green/
  15. 15. LID IN URBANIZED AREASDevelopment rules will need to be modified topromote/incentivize LID and reduce imperviouscover.These rules●include subdivision codes,zoning regulations, parkingand street standards andother local ordinances thatregulate development●are often responsible forwide streets, expansiveparking lots and large-lotsubdivisions that reduceopen space and naturalresources and/or increase http://www.completestreets.org/webdocs/factsheets/cs-greenstreets.pdfimpervious cover.15
  16. 16. ADVANTAGES OF LID/GI16 http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Permeable+Pavers+On+Streets&view=d etail&id=D1BF0A2652C8E939491905E8EC687FD0B7B528ED&first=106
  17. 17. LID/GI CHALLENGES● More complex design process● Requires increased construction oversight● Requires land owner education for private facilities● Structural BMPs and/or amended soils paired with LID may be required in heavily urbanized areas with limited green space17
  18. 18. WHO TO RESEARCH AND WATCH Photo: Greg Raisman, flickr.com/photos/gregraisman National Complete Streets Coalition on-line newsletter18
  19. 19. WHAT BRWM & SARA ARE DOING● Pre-design Sustainability Matrix● 2012 Bond Project – Pre-design BMP assessments – RFP scope recommendations● San Antonio Land / Water Sustainability Forum – LID education outreach – Design competition● Code Reviews – UDC – TCEQ – SAWS● LID Evaluation and Design Manual19
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  21. 21. CONTACT INFORMATION Watersheds Program Leader ● Karen Bishop, Sustainable – (210) 302-3642; kbishop@sara-tx.org ● Steve Graham, P.E., CFM, SARA Assistant GM – (210) 302-3622; sgraham@sara-tx.org21

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