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Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary
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Downtown San Antonio Transportation Study - Executive Summary

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  • 1. C i t y o f S a n A n to n i o E xecutive S ummary A pproved by C ity C ouncil N ovember 2012UrbanBiology LLCdesign + planning for a living world www.urbanbiology.net
  • 2. A cknowledgementsEXECUTIVE SUMMARY City Council Infrastructure and Capital Improvements Rialto Studio Page O ne Growth Committee Management Services (CIMS) (Urban Design & Planning ) W. Reed Williams, District 8 | Chair Mike Frisbie James Gray Leticia Ozuna, District 3 Razi Hosseini Mark Bowles Rey Saldaña, District 4 Luis Maltos HR&A Advisors Ray Lopez, District 6 Public Works (Economic Analysis ) Carlton Soules, District 10 Majed Al-Ghafry Jamie Torres Springer Downtown Transportation Study Mike Rogers Carrie-Ann Broder Steering Committee Nefi Garza Christina De La Cruz UrbanBiology Pat DiGiovanni (Deputy City Manager) Marcus Hammer (Planning , Landscape Design ) Ben Brewer (Downtown Alliance) Mark Brodeur (Center City Development Office) Marita Roos City Staff Brian Buchanan (VÍA) Judy Babbitt (Public Works) PPS Project for Public Spaces Brian James (Fort Sam Houston Community Development) (Placemaking ) Bill Barker (Office of Environmental Policy) Kerri Collins (Pape-Dawson) Richard De La Cruz (CIMS) Phil Myrick Lori Houston (Center City Development Office) Julia Diana (Office of Environmental Policy) Alessandra Galletti Mike Etienne (Capital Improvements Management Services) Kay Hindes (Historic Preservation) Mike Frisbie (Capital Improvements Management Services) Trish Wallace (Planning & Community Development) Ximenes & Associates Nefi Garza (Public Works) (Public Involvement ) Jim Mery (Downtown Operations) Razi Hosseini (Capital Improvements Management Services) Project Team Sonia Jimenez Linda Ximenes Sam Dawson (Pape-Dawson) Pape-Dawson Engineers Prime Consultant Overland Partners City Manager’s Office (Project Management, (Urban Design ) Transportation Engineering, Design) Pat DiGiovanni Steve Kline Kerri Collins, Project Manager Center City Development Office Derek Mueller GRAM Traffic Counting Mark Brodeur Carlos Vides (D ata Collection ) Lori Houston Robert Nassour ARUP HemisFair Park Area (Urban Planning/Transportation Planning) AC Group Redevelopment Corporation James Daisa (D ata Collection ) Andrés Andujar Ellen Greenberg Rene Arredondo
  • 3. The Downtown Transportation Study (DTS) was commissioned by the What is Different about This Study ? City of San Antonio in support of Mayor Julián Castro’s vision for trans- The San Antonio Downtown Transportation Study recommendsEXECUTIVE SUMMARY portation and lifestyle in Downtown as outlined in the SA 2020 Final improvements that are context sensitive. A context sensitive Great cities transportation improvement is one that complements and Page T wo Report, March 2011. As the Mayor stated, “The next months, the next have great downtowns. And the supports the surrounding land uses, visually, functionally, and years are about doing… about putting action to the ink on paper.” The linkages between a vibrant, energetic and growing downtown in scale. A context sensitive transportation improvement also community indicated transportation needs to be improved first and an preserves, enhances or incorporates in its design what the additional priority is improving Downtown. The DTS identifies how to community feels is important and values. The concepts identi- and an inviting and efficient create what the community has envisioned. The project was managed fied in this study are not limited to street improvements but transportation system are by the Capital Improvements Management Services (CIMS) Department extend beyond the curbs into the streetside with the intent of undeniable. Great downtowns offer with participation from Center City Development Office (CCDO). transforming the appearance and feel of the area. culture, convenience, and a variety of An example of a concept that transforms the appearance of The Objectives of the transportation options for getting in Commerce Street and incorporates complete streets elements San Antonio Downtown Transportation Study to enhance the pedestrian experience is shown below. The and out of center cities. In order to accomplish what the community and the Mayor envisioned in photograph on the left is a view of Commerce looking east – SA 2020 SA 2020, the following objectives have been identified: towards Camaron. The rendering on the right shows a concept z Advance the goals for Downtown established in SA 2020 and that extends the sidewalk and adds street trees, lighting and The Strategic Framework Plan streetscaping elements. z Develop transportation improvements that support a sustainable, vibrant, world-class Downtown z Develop street improvement guidance that keeps pace with an ever-evolving Downtown z Recommend near-term capital improvements to catalyze growth z Enhance San Antonio’s unparalleled hospitality trade The objectives can be achieved through implementing improvements that address the following: z Transform Downtown z Encourage economic development z Improve access to/from Downtown z Improve circulation within Downtown and connections to adjacent areas, and the River Walk z Provide multi-modal choices
  • 4. Summary of SA 2020’s Vision and Targets for DowntownEXECUTIVE SUMMARY I ndicators T argets P age T hree VISION FOR DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT How the Downtown In 2020, Downtown is the heart of San Antonio and is everyone’s neighborhood Transportation Study Helps l Increase downtown housing units by 5,000 including mixed Achieve SA 2020’s Targets z Number of housing units in Downtown income and student housing z People working downtown l Increase the number of downtown employees by 25% (13,775 The Downtown Transportation Study includes three z Transportation mode options additional employees) l Reduce vehicle miles traveled per person by 10% primary components: near-term capital projects, long-range transportation improvements, and street VISION FOR ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS In 2020, San Antonio is recognized as a leader in business that prospers through innovation in 21st century industries design guidance. The recommendations in each component address numerous SA 2020 goals and l The better of 1) increase in per capita income by 20% or, 2) be in the top 1/3 of per capita incomes in the U.S. z Per capita income targets. Specifically, the study recommends specific l Maintain steady job growth in traditional San Antonio sectors, z Job growth in traditional and high technology sectors projects and long-term planning guidance to improve and pursue 10% job growth in health, information technology- security industries, aerospace, and the new energy economy automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian facilities, with VISION FOR NATURAL RESOURCES the ultimate goal of improving San Antonio residents’ In 2020, San Antonio is recognized as a respectful steward of its natural resources and a model for responsible resource management ability to choose non-automobile travel modes. It z Tree canopy l 15% tree canopy in Central Business District. also recommends improvements to street operations, safety, route clarity, landscaping, and placemaking, VISION FOR NEIGHBORHOODS AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT In 2020, San Antonio is known for its cohesive neighborhoods with compelling and unique personalities supporting SA 2020’s goal of creating vibrant, safe z Number of pedestrian-oriented neighborhoods streets for new residents, businesses, and visitors. l Increase number of pedestrian-oriented neighborhoods z Population growth in Center City neighborhoods and l A 15% increase in the Center City population Downtown l A 20% increase in the Walk Score® of Center City neighborhoods z Walkability score VISION FOR TRANSPORTATION In 2020, San Antonio’s transportation system is recognized as a model of efficiency and environmental sustainability z Public Transportation Ridership l A tripling in transit ridership z Travel Time Index (ratio of travel time in peak to travel l Decrease from 1.23 to a ratio of 1.1 time in free-flow) l A tripling of the number of miles of Complete Streets z Miles of Complete Streets Source: SA 2020, Final Report, March 19, 2011
  • 5. Guidance for Future Transportation and Land Use ProjectsEXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Downtown Transportation Study is intended to support deci- Page Four sion-making for long- and short-range transportation-oriented and complementary projects in the downtown area. These improvements will, in turn, support Downtown’s transformation into a world-class destination, serving visitors and locals alike. To do that, the transportation system needs to be comfortable for the full range of users while providing efficient movement from one place to another. This Study identified the short-term improvements in the form of projects funded as part of the 2012 Bond Program. Beyond these short-term priorities, the Study examines Downtown’s existing transportation system to review how the system works today and to evaluate each proposed improvement in today’s conditions and in the future in year 2020. Improvements focus on the streets on which people travel, from the building front to the sidewalk to the street itself. The Study identifies transportation improvement projects to support the further evolu- tion of Downtown streets, addressing their design and operation. Finally, the study complements these specific projects with a range of flexible guidelines for street improvements. Following analysis of street characteristics and functions, a customized set of street types was devel- oped and each downtown street was assigned a “type.” The street types are flexible to allow developers, the City, residents, and other interested parties to be sensitive to the wide range of existing roadway conditions found downtown, as well as the range of conditions adjacent to the road- ways. The street types demonstrate how pedestrians, bicyclists, passenger autos, trucks, and transit vehicles can share roadways, while creating invit- ing places for people to explore and enjoy visits to Downtown and travel throughout the city.
  • 6. The Public Involvement Process The public involvement process communicated keyEXECUTIVE SUMMARY messages throughout the project. At start-up, the Page Five community was introduced to the project, its objec- tives, scope and study area. A project website was created to allow for continuous access to project information and to provide a portal for receiving public comment. Stakeholders were identified, contacted and, in some cases, met with directly to present project ideas and information. In addition to the public, City staff was apprised through three substantive meetings including participation in workshop exercises, and the Steering Committee was kept abreast through meet- ings, monthly updates and via access to a password-protected section of the What Needs Improving from the project website. Community’s Perspective In addition, monthly presentations An online survey associated with Public Meeting #2 was developed to solicit were made to the City Council feedback on street typologies, proposed Bond projects and desired street members of the Infrastructure and enhancements. Growth Committee. A total of 152 responses were received. The results of the online survey showed the top five elements desired for the categories of street types. For example, respondents selected seating, street trees, lighting, wider sidewalks and wayfind- ing signage for Downtown Activity Streets. Downtown Lifestyle streets showed similar results except bike lanes and public plazas were selected instead of wider sidewalks and wayfinding signage. Downtown Essential streets showed a shift towards transit and autos with a desire for improved transit facilities and signals timed for vehicles. Surprisingly, respondents selected the need for pedestrian lighting in all five categories of street types.
  • 7. EXISTING CONDITION LEVEL OF SERVICE (LOS) Existing Traffic Conditions Intersections analyzedEXECUTIVE SUMMARY Prior to developing and evaluating transportation with LOS D, E, or F during improvements, the existing condition of the trans- one or both peak hours: Page Six portation system within the study area had to first be established. The existing traffic conditions are based Market Street at : on current volume levels and intersection operations. F rio Therefore, a comprehensive data collection effort Flores and analysis was conducted as part of the Downtown A lamo Transportation Study. Flores Street at : N ueva Intersection Capacity Analysis Santa Rosa at : The Downtown roadway network was replicated in a N ueva computer software program known as SYNCHRO. The Travis SYNCHRO analysis results provide an indication of how Martin the intersections are currently function- César Chávez ing during the weekday peak hours. The Boulevard at : results are based on the methodology outlined in the Highway Capacity Manual I nterstate 37 which is a recognized industry standard Alamo for evaluating intersections. The result St. Mary ’s provided is Level of Service (LOS). The LOS Santa Rosa is based on the average delay experienced Broadway at : by motorists traveling through the intersection. The M cCullough LOS can vary from LOS A to LOS F with LOS A represent- Brooklyn ing the best condition with little or no delay and LOS F Newell representing the worst condition with substantial delay and congestion. The analysis results, as displayed in the St. Mary ’s at : adjacent figure, show the following 18 intersections P ecan currently function at a LOS D (yellow), E (red), or F (blue) Frio at : during one or both peak hours. All other intersections Guadalupe (green) are operating at LOS C or better. The results indi- Guadalupe at : cate the Downtown intersections are functioning well P ecos La T rinidad with only a few exceptions. Martin at : S an Saba
  • 8. Priority Growth Areas in Downtown San Antonio PRIORITY GROWTH AREAS IN DOWNTOWN SAN ANTONIO ASHBY SAN PEDRO Future Growth: DEWEY AY MCCULLOUGH ADW PASCHAL FLORES Introduction to the Downtown Growth Areas OGDEN JOSEP BRO FR LO HINE CU E MYRTLE DE ST RIEXECUTIVE SUMMARY C KS The Strategic Framework Plan for the Center City1 recommended two categories of River North - BU CULEBRA GRAYSON R ID Midtown Brackenridge G CL BRAZOS LAUREL EU OLIVE LAUREL Page Seven Downtown areas that can primarily accommodate residential growth. These are “priority” MAVERICK HOWARD CARSON PA LEWIS MAIN LOMBRANO RK MO NEWE growth areas and “additional” or long-range growth areas, both of which have capac- ER LL IE MASON ALA POPLAR POPLAR ity to support the housing targets established in SA 2020 and street-level activity along 35 N Downtown’s north-south and east-west corridors. DELGADO RIVAS W AR RE LL JO NE S S HA Y AR NC DUVAL COLORADO ARBOR PLA I OS M CE ID QU CL EN SAN MARC EU D M RUIZ IRA CA The Fundamental Needs of Downtown Residents S 10 M LLA EL DA 10 LEAL S TA TH MedicalN District SHERMAN GU AU 9T As new housing is added to the three thousand downtown units already found in the study area, residents will PEREZ AV AR H BURLESON SOLEDAD RO 8T H MUNCEY MORALES C WILLOW A need access to the mix of retail businesses and services that make life in an urban area practical and conve- M LAMAR BR A RO 6T O MARTIN H O N KL 5T nient. In this study these are termed “essentials.” The essentials include the daily household needs of individuals HAYS YN H SALINAS 4T MARTIN H BURNET and families, such as grocery and drug stores, dry cleaners, and day care facilities. Residents also need other Westside SANTA ROSA PECAN Urban Core MEDINA Multimodal 3R S LAS MORA D TRAVIS NOLAN FLORES Transit Center types of shopping, including clothing, electronics, and hardware. Finally, children and adults in Downtown CHESTNUT LIVE OAK ST MARYS COMMERCE HOUSTON ELM DAWSON need educational facilities. BUENA VISTA Near West Side 35 Main Plaza ALAMO CROCKE HOUSTON TT MONTEREY Near East Side Although not an absolute requirement in all neighborhoods, recreational, dining and cultural destinations COM CROCKETT Civic Center VILL MAR MERC E 37 are very important elements in a downtown. Many people who choose an urban lifestyle do so because they DURANGO ITA KET CENTER MONUMENTAL SALADO COMAL NU FRIO EVA MAIN PINE CE have a particular interest in access to culture, including music, art, and theater. Such residents require these SAN FERNA SA RC HA NDO VE Z amenities, and they must be accompanied CHERRY HACKBERRY EL PASO MESQUITE OLIVE HemisFair and LEONA BOWIE Priority Growth Area MONTANA MEDINA 2011 2020 2035 by restaurants, cafes, and bars, all allowing GUADALUP E Cesar Chavez Corridor AR Robert COLIMA SEN WYOMING Thompson residents to find entertainment within close VERA CRUZ AL TU RN LA VA Transit Center ER BA C DAKOTARiver North – Midtown Brackenridge 3,500 7,500 12,000 proximity of their homes. RR ER A M A IA NEVADA ILL RE N FU W ISO TAMPIC GI ST M NG 1 Centro Partnership San Antonio. December 2011. PRES O O AD CA MARTIN LUTHER KINGUrban/Downtown Core 1,800 5,300 8,500 KI BRAZOS MP M ARY A Strategic Framework Plan for the Center City. San Antonio. LEI GH ’S IOWA SAN MARCOS CED R O GE ALA AM AL E 4,600 8,800 14,200 EAHemisFair and César Chávez Corridor AR MO DL CE VIRGINIA VA RID LLO DE S VIN E Near River South INDIANA R LABO RE WIC HM 2,600 4,300 6,800 FELNear River South AN DELAWARE RNE KES STAF N CLA Y MI BOE SS FLORIDA AD IO GU Priority Growth Areas are AM N LAC OLIVE PORTER EN Subtotal 12,500 25,900 41,500 HA SIMON HOEFGEN S PPE FES TH FU LLE T RN S ER areas of the downtown esti- PENDLETON ISH LOTU DENVER ES ESSEX mated to absorb almost half R FLORest of the Center City Study Area 17,000 21,500 34,600 RAY LONE ST AR VITR A WESTFALL of the 7,500 new households GLASS LAM BER HEL ST FRA NCIS BOYER PROBANDT T ENA HIGH targeted to be built between ORIENTAL LOWEL Total 29,500 47,400 76,100 Legend CASS L DREXEL DREXEL MISSION CAS BAN now and 2020. S K HAMMOND GROV Priority PRUITT Growth Areas* E OLIVE PINE DRAKE OEL RIGSBY LT KER Source: HR&A Advisors Source: San Antonio Strategic (MostlyBAYLOR Residential) S ROOSEVE BERKSHIRE S ITO KAYTON ST EV Framework Plan and CAR AL LE HIGHLA ES Long-Term Growth Areas G ND NO HIGHLAND PRESA HR&A Advisors (Employment Hubs and 10 WILKEN AVANT Future Residential) S MC BAILEY KAY Study Area 0 0.25 0.5 Miles *Priority Growth Areas are areas of the downtown estimated to absorb almost half of the new 7,500 households targeted to be built between now and 2020. Source: San Antonio Strategic Framework Plan and HR&A Advisors
  • 9. Downtown Residents, continued Green space is another important requirement in a downtown, supporting healthy  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY activities such as walking and bicycling, providing play areas for children, and  Page Eight allowing residents to unwind in a quiet place. Many downtown residents will live  in multi-family housing and will have a greater need for public open space such as parks and greenways as compared to people who live in single-family homes.  These spaces will serve as outdoor living rooms in some parts of the year, and  will also provide visual relief and greenery as a contrast to the denser, built-up  Downtown environment. Finally, Downtown residents need efficient forms of transportation, both within  the Downtown area and to destinations outside of Downtown. Some may  travel to school or work elsewhere, while meeting many of their daily needs in  Downtown. Those residents may access local destinations on foot or by bicycle, while reaching school or work on public transportation. All of these transpor-  tation options, and roadway and parking space for private automobiles, are  necessary to support the daily activities of local residents.  Growth Area Transportation      Choices and Accessibility      The term accessibility is used to describe people’s ability to easily reach the      destinations that help them meet their fundamental needs. With a large number      of destinations in close proximity, many people will want to access them on           foot.  San Antonio’s walkability has room for improvement relative to other large      cities. As of 2012, San Antonio’s overall Walk Score is 41 out of 100, 40th among      large US cities.  The Walk Score website ranks locations on a scale of 0 to 100,      identifying walkability.  Advantages of increased downtown accessibility include : z Reduced vehicle trips and reduced average trip length – saving people time and money and taking cars off San Antonio’s streets z Independent mobility for youth, seniors and other non-drivers z Greater convenience for people living and working downtown z Making transit, carpool and vanpool more attractive commute options because mid-day chores can be easily accomplished on foot z Easy patronage to downtown businesses
  • 10. Recommendations of the Three Primary Components of the DTS Recommendations: Downtown Transportation Study 1. Near -Term Capital Projects (2012 Bond Projects)EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Because the recommended improvements in the San Antonio DTS are designed to meet The initial set of downtown roadway improvement projects are scheduled to be funded with the 2012 Page Nine the integrated goals of SA 2020, the traditional categories of transportation improve- Bond. The Bond program has allocated $40 million for downtown improvement projects. ments (i.e., access, mobility, capacity enhancement, and safety) inadequately describe the multiple purposes and the catalytic nature of the recommendations. Therefore, the The following projects were selected for inclusion improvements were placed into categories that signified an overall design emphasis, but in the 2012 B ond P rogram : also described the overlapping and complementary transportation and non-transporta- Market Street Realignment : Bowie to Interstate 37 tion functions of the improvements. Frio Street : César Chávez to Houston The categories define functions beyond the traditional mobility and land access purpose; Commerce Street : Santa Rosa to St. Mary ’s a feature that makes the DTS a unique transportation plan. The categories combine multimodal transportation function with elements that improve the surrounding context, Main Avenue & Soledad : Commerce to Martin support the City’s economic goals, and provide the infrastructure for the creation of San Pedro , Main , Navarro , and Soledad intersections special places. The categories are: Getting to Downtown, Getting Around Downtown, Placemaking, Making Better Streets, and Enabling Downtown Growth. 2. Long -Range Transportation Improvements The projects not identified as part of the 2012 Bond Program or the HemisFair redevelopment are currently Downtown Transportation Study Improvement Categories unfunded. These projects represent long-range improvements for the Downtown area. As future fund- ing sources become available, these concepts should be considered for implementation. The long-range Improvement Category E mphasis and Types of Improvements improvements consist of a mix of corridor improvements, intersection improvements, and wayfinding and DOWNTOWN ACCESS: branding enhancements. Getting to Downtown Freeway access, gateway design, intermodal connections. 3. D owntown Street D esign Guidance DOWNTOWN CIRCULATION: In order to create design guidelines and to help Getting Around Downtown Changes in street operations, intersection configuration, signalization, prioritize future investment in Downtown streets, route clarity, pedestrian and bike facilities and improvements. the Downtown Transportation Study uses a street DESIGN FOR SPECIAL STREETS: typology framework to organize streets into Unique elements on designated streets. Custom furnishings, lighting, distinct street types based on shared character- Placemaking gathering places, landscape, outdoor dining, connections to the River istics. A typology is simply a collection of types, Walk and landmarks, special events and markets. each representing a unique combination of physi- cal, cultural, and transportation contexts. The STREETSCAPE ESSENTIALS: Making Better Streets Sidewalks, lighting, plantings, furnishings, parking systems, signage. types reflect an understanding that streets are Typologies to match different functions (e.g. residential, commercial, etc) host to numerous users and must serve many functions, from public activity space to vehicular IMPROVEMENTS FOR KEY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES: mobility. Street design must therefore strive to Enabling Downtown Growth New access points, route clarity, multimodal connections, capacity and/or foster high-quality public spaces, be sensitive to surrounding context, operational improvements to serve new development. and be flexible enough to accommodate change.
  • 11. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Near-Term Capital Projects (2012 Bond Projects) Page T en Market Street Realignment The Market Street Realignment project consists of realigning Market Street to run parallel to Commerce Street and to create a new IH-37 Frontage Road that extends from Commerce, south to César Chávez Boulevard. The newly realigned Market Street would form a T-type intersection with the Frontage Road and would be signalized. Construction of this project is to be funded by the 2012 Bond Program. The design is being completed under a current CIMS project and has not been finalized. An added benefit of the Market Street Realignment project is the improved connectivity with the East Side. The realignment will provide a new connection from the southbound exit ramp from IH-37 at Commerce. Also, Montana is being considered for two-way operation as part of the project which would provide an additional Streetside Travel Travel Travel Streetside lane lane lane connection from Commerce and Market Street to the East Side. Commerce Street Concept Frio Street : César Chávez to Houston The proposed concept for Frio Street consists of reducing the inside lane widths and, if necessary, median/center turn lane, to provide a wide outside lane with sharrow markings. Additional improvements include street plantings and furnishings, pedestrian lighting, wider sidewalks and improved pedestrian crossings. While not listed on the City’s Bike Plan, bike facilities were deemed important on Frio because of its proximity to UTSA and the Westside Multimodal Transit Center as well as the absence of north-south bike routes on the west side of Downtown. Commerce Street : Santa Rosa to St. Mary ’s Commerce Street is one of the most prominent streets in Downtown. In many cases, it is the street of entry for visitors and tourists. It provides access to major destinations and also serves as an east-west connector. The sidewalks of Commerce Street serve large numbers of pedestrians and transit users. In order to improve the quality of other modes of transporta- tion, and to transform the appearance of Commerce Street, this study proposes the removal of the bus-only lane to utilize this space to incorporate elements that improve the public realm and encourage pedestrian activity. By removing the bus lane, the sidewalks can be widened to accommodate pedestrians and to offer amenities such as street trees, benches and café seating, and lighting; effectively transforming the streetside. Proposed view of Commerce Street looking east towards Camaron
  • 12. Main Avenue & Soledad : Commerce to Martin Main Avenue and Soledad are a one-way pair north of Commerce Street. Volumes on both EXECUTIVE SUMMARY streets have reduced since Main Plaza was constructed and neither street now connects south of Commerce. Page Eleven The existing traffic lanes can now be used for other purposes. This study proposes to install bike lanes, widen the sidewalks, add street trees, curb extensions, lighting and streetscap- ing elements and provide both reverse angle and parallel parking. These improvements will change the character of the public realm and will encourage street activity and commerce in the area by inviting pedestrian traffic and providing parking for nearby retail. San Pedro , Main , Navarro , and S oledad Intersections The intersection of San Pedro, Main, Navarro, and Soledad is a gateway intersection into Downtown. The inter- San Pedro, Main, Navarro and Soledad Intersection Concept section is located in North Downtown, next to the Central Library. The exist- ing configuration contains confusing channelization, restricted turning move- ments, offset travel paths across the intersection and a bus contra-flow lane creating a confusing intersection that can greatly impede wayfinding. Four options were developed to simplify and improve the intersection. Three options are conventional intersection designs which modify the channeliza- tion, move the approaches closer to theProposed view toward south on Main Avenue towards Houston Street, with the Book Building, center of the intersection and provideFrost Bank and the historic Robert E. Lee buildings as landmarks. better intersection alignments. The fourth option is a roundabout which will require additional right-of-way. All four options result in additional green space around the intersection forming viable locations for placemaking, which can enhance the area and be integrated with the library and other adjacent land uses. Proposed roundabout at the intersection of San Pedro, Navarro, Soledad and North Main, with Central Christian Church in background.
  • 13. Long-Range Transportation Improvements Following are descriptions of a portion of the DTS projects. These are not 2012 Bond projects, and, as such, EXECUTIVE SUMMARY have no identified funding source. Page Twelve Navarro & St. Mary ’s Streets  – Villita to Convent The proposed improvement for Navarro Street removes the bus-only lane to enhance the experience for pedestrians. The proposed concept for Navarro Street provides inset on-street parking, sidewalk widen- ing, curb extensions and a wide outside lane with sharrow markings. Similar to Navarro Street, the proposed concept for St. Mary’s Street removes the bus-only lane to provide bike lanes and wider side- walks. The sidewalks will be widened primarily on the east side to transform the existing sidewalk into a wider, pedestrian friendly walkway with more potential for streetscaping elements. Although this concept does not show on-street parking, a more detailed survey of the available right-of-way may reveal sufficient width to accommodate on-street parking. Santa Rosa  – Nueva to César Chávez The proposed improvements for Santa Rosa consist primarily of adding bike lanes and wide outside lanes with sharrow markings. Looking south on Santa Rosa Street, north of Houston Street. The campus of Christus Santa Rosa Although Santa Rosa is not listed on the current bike plan, bicycle Children’s Hospital is shown right, and the Vistana apartments are shown, center.Navarro Street concept improvements were deemed important because of the absence of north-south bike routes on the west side of downtown, especially considering bike lanes most likely cannot be accommodated on Flores due to its narrow right-of-way and high traffic volumes. Santa Rosa also connects to signed bike routes on Houston and Travis and to proposed bike lanes on Nueva. Additional streetscaping improvements such as pedestrian-scale lighting and plant- ings are also recommended. Santa Rosa Street Concept St. Mary’s Street Concept
  • 14. Long -Range Transportation Improvements, continued Houston , 3rd , and Bonham Intersection Flores —M arket to Old Guilbeau The intersection of Houston, 3rd, and Bonham is currently comprised of two closely spaced intersections consist-EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The proposed improvements for Flores consist of converting the roadway from ing of a signalized four-legged intersection at Houston and Bonham and an unsignalized T-intersection at two southbound lanes and one northbound lane with parking to one travel lane in Houston and 3rd Street. Houston Street and 3rd Street are both part of the continuous Martin Street corridor. Page T hirteen each direction and a center two-way left turn lane or median between Old Guilbeau The Alamo backs onto the southwest corner of the intersection, and the signing on Interstate 37 directs traffic and Nueva. On-street parking and curb bulb-outs would be provided on the east destined for the Alamo to exit onto Houston Street. However, at Houston Street, drivers cannot make a left-turn side of Flores. A mid-block crossing with landscaped median is proposed just north to reach the Alamo. The intersection is currently configured in a way that does not allow for a left-turn lane and of Old Guilbeau. Between Nueva and Dolorosa, one lane northbound and two Houston Street between Alamo and 3rd/Bonham Street is one-way eastbound. This results in driver confusion lanes southbound are proposed along with on-street parking and curb bulb-outs and needless circulation resulting in increased traffic in the area. along both sides of the street. Flores is listed on the current City Bike Plan, but the projected 2020 traffic volumes require dedicated turn lanes at the intersections. Installation of a roundabout in conjunction with converting this block of Houston Street from one-way to two- The narrow pavement width precludes bike lanes or wide outside lanes from being way operation is recommended to improve wayfinding and provide a visual gateway to the Alamo Mission carried through intersections. There are existing or proposed bike lanes on parallel from the east. The roundabout would eliminate the need for left-turn storage at the intersection while allowing streets: Main, Soledad, drivers to “turn left” for direct access to the western segment of Houston Street, and to the Alamo. Additionally and Santa Rosa, so bike the roundabout improves safety by removing traditional left-turns and creates opportunities for placemak- lanes on Flores are not ing. Some right-of-way will be required for the roundabout, and the City would need to coordinate with the necessary for connec- Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) to retain the right-of-way along the south side of Houston Street. tivity. The addition of The roundabout will operate with acceptable levels of service in 2020. on-street parking on Flores will support houston Street economic development The alamo along the roadway. Bonham Street The corridor from Main Avenue to Old Guilbeau is lined with Bonham Street storefronts, but many are currently vacant. Additional streetscap- ing improvements such as pedestrian scale lighting and plantings are also recommended. Flores Street looking north to Nueva Street, view of proposed improvements. Proposed traffic roundabout at Houston Street, east of, or “behind,” the Alamo Mission.
  • 15. NO BUILD CONDITION SA Map Base OF- SERVICE (LOS) LEVEL- 2020 No Build Condition Level of Service (LOS) LEGEND The following intersections function at a ASHBY Intersections with LOS D, E, or F during the AM or PM peak hour LOS A-C LOS D (yellow), E (red), or F (blue) during SAN PEDRO LOS D one or both peak hours for the DEWEY MCCULLOUGH PASCHAL FLORES LOS E 2020 No Build condition: OGDEN JOSEP FR LO HINE LOS F Future Traffic Conditions CU ED MYRTLE ST Market Street at : ER IC KS AY BU Frio CULEBRA GRAYSON RG ID ADWEXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2020 “No Build” CL BRAZOS MO LAUREL EU OLIVE San Saba LAUREL ALA BRO PA MAVERICK HOWARD CARSON RK LEWIS Conditions MAIN LOMBRANO Page Fourteen F lores NEWE ER LL IE MASON Alamo POPLAR POPLAR T he signalized intersections within the Commerce Street at : RIVAS RE N JO AR downtown area were analyzed in the Frio DELGADO W S HA LL Y NE S AR NC DUVAL COLORADO ARBOR PLA I F lores OS M QU existing condition, the future 2020 No CE CL ID EN SAN MARC EU D M RUIZ IRA CA S LLA Build condition, and the future 2020 Flores Street at : LEAL EL M DA S TA 10 TH SHERMAN GU Build condition. N ueva PEREZ NA VA RR AU 9T H BURLESON O 8T César Chávez H MUNCEY MORALES C WILLOW A The No Build condition consists of M LAMAR BR Arsenal A RO 6T O MARTIN H O N KL 5T projected 2020 traffic volumes with HAYS YN H Santa Rosa at : SALINAS MARTIN 4T H BURNET the existing intersection geometry and SANTA ROSA PECAN Martin MEDINA 3R SOLEDAD S LAS MORA D TRAVIS NOLAN Travis FLORES signal operation. None of the complete CHESTNUT LIVE OAK ST MARYS COMMERCE HOUSTON ELM streets improvements are included Nueva BUENA VISTA DAWSON César Chávez ALAMO CROCKE HOUSTON TT in the No Build condition. The results MONTEREY CROCKETT César Chávez Boulevard at : COM MERC represent how the intersections will E MAIN B DURANGO VILL MAR M ain ITA KET CENTER MONUMENTAL SALADO COMAL NU FRIO function in the future with the increase EVA PINE S t. Mary ’s SAN FERNA CE SA in volumes due to growth but without Alamo NDO RC HA VE CHERRY HACKBERRY EL PASO Z HEMISFAIR MESQUITE Interstate 37 OLIVE the proposed improvements in place. LEONA BOWIE MONTANA MEDINA GUADALUP E The intersections that will function Broadway at : COLIMA AR SEN AL WYOMING TU LA at a LOS D (yellow), E (red). or F (blue) M cCullough VERA CRUZ RN ER BA VA C A DAKOTA RR Brooklyn ER M A IA during one or both peak hours for the NEVADA ILL RE N Newell FU W ISO TAMPIC GI ST M NG PRES O O AD 2020 No Build condition are shown in CA MARTIN LUTHER KING KI BRAZOS MP M ARY A Guadalupe Street at : LEI GH ’S the figure at right. IOWA SAN MARCOS Frio CED R O GE ALA AM AL E EA A MO DL VIRGINIA R Pecos La T rinidad CE RID VA DE LLO VIN S E INDIANA R LABO Alamo at : RE HM WIC FEL AN DELAWARE N P robandt RNE KES STAF CLA Y MI BOE SS FLORIDA Adams AD IO GU A N LAC OLIVE PORTER MS EN HA SIMON HOEFGEN PPE FES TH FU LLE T RN S ER LOTU Martin at : PENDLETON ISH DENVER RES ESSEX FLO Pecos La T rinidad RAY LONE ST AR VITR A WESTFALL ST FRA San Saba GLASS LAM BER HEL NCIS BOYER PROBANDT T ENA HIGH ORIENTAL LOWEL L DREXEL Houston at : CASS DREXEL MISSION CAS BAN S K HAMMOND GROV Bonham E OLIVE PRUITT PINE DRAKE OEL RIGSBY LT KER S ROOSEVE BERKSHIRE Bowie BAYLOR S ITO KAYTON ST E CAR AL VE LE HIGHLA G S ND NO HIGHLAND St. Mary ’s at : PRESA WILKEN AVANT S P ecan MC KAY BAILEY Camden 0.5 Miles Intersections with LOS D, E, or F during the AM or PM peak hour
  • 16. BUILD CONDITION SA Map Base OF- SERVICE (LOS) LEVEL- 2020 Build Condition Level of Service (LOS) ASHBY LEGEND Intersections with LOS D, E, or F during the AM or PM peak hour LOS A-C SAN PEDRO DEWEY LOS D MCCULLOUGH PASCHAL FLORES LOS E OGDEN JOSEP The following intersections function FR LO HINE LOS F CU ED MYRTLE ST Future Traffic Conditions , continued ER at a LOS D (yellow), E (red), or F (blue) IC KS WAY BU CULEBRA during one or both peak hours for the GRAYSON R ID G CL BRAZOS MO LAURELEXECUTIVE SUMMARY AD 2020 “Build” Condition EU OLIVE LAUREL 2020 Build condition. ALA BRO PA MAVERICK HOWARD CARSON RK LEWIS MAIN LOMBRANO NEWE ER LL Page Fifteen Market Street at : IE The Build condition consists of projected 2020 POPLAR POPLAR MASON traffic volumes and the proposed improvement Frio RIVAS N RE JO AR concepts identified in this report. The traffic Flores Street at : DELGADO W S HA LL Y NE S AR NC DUVAL COLORADO ARBOR PLA UI OS M signal timing was also optimized throughout N ueva CE CL ID Q EN SAN MARC EU D M RUIZ IRA CA S LLA the downtown network for the Build condition. A rsenal LEAL EL M DA S TA 10 TH SHERMAN GU NA AU 9T The projected 2020 volumes were devel- A lamo PEREZ VA RR O 8T H H BURLESON MUNCEY MORALES C WILLOW A oped using the MPO model in conjunction Santa Rosa at : M LAMAR BR A RO 6T O MARTIN H O N KL 5T with information associated with anticipated HAYS YN H Martin SALINAS MARTIN 4T H BURNET growth areas and increases in housing and SANTA ROSA PECAN Nueva MEDINA 3R SOLEDAD S LAS MORA D TRAVIS NOLAN FLORES workforce. The increase in traffic volumes César Chávez CHESTNUT LIVE OAK ST MARYS COMMERCE HOUSTON ELM DAWSON varies in different areas of downtown depend- BUENA VISTA César Chávez Boulevard at : ALAMO CROCKE HOUSTON TT ing on the level of growth identified. While MONTEREY M ain COM MERC CROCKETT some streets only experience minor traffic E MAIN B DURANGO VILL MAR St. Mary ’s ITA KET CENTER MONUMENTAL SALADO COMAL NU FRIO growth, other streets, such as those on the EVA PINE A lamo SAN FERNA CE SA south side of downtown can show increases in NDO RC HA I nterstate 37 VE CHERRY HACKBERRY EL PASO Z HEMISFAIR MESQUITE OLIVE traffic of 40 to 60 percent, or more. The traffic LEONA BOWIE MONTANA MEDINA GUADALUP E volumes were unchanged between the No Broadway at : COLIMA AR SEN WYOMING AL LA Build and Build analyses since the only changes Newell VERA CRUZ TU RN ER BA VA C A DAKOTA RR Josephine ER M A introduced for the Build condition were the IA NEVADA ILL RE N FU W ISO TAMPIC GI ST M NG PRES O O Guadalupe Street at : AD proposed improvements. The adjacent figure CA MARTIN LUTHER KING KI BRAZOS MP M ARY A LEI GH ’S shows the levels of service at the intersections Frio IOWA SAN MARCOS CED R MO GE ALA A AL E EA AR MO DL VIRGINIA analyzed for the 2020 Build condition. Pecos La T rinidad CE RID VA DE LLO VIN S E INDIANA R LABO Most of the downtown intersections show Alamo at : RE HM WIC FEL AN DELAWARE N RNE KES STAF CLA acceptable levels of service for the No Build P robandt Y MI BOE SS FLORIDA AD IO GU AM and Build conditions and none of the proposed N LAC OLIVE PORTER EN Martin at : HA SIMON HOEFGEN S PPE FES TH FU LLE T RN S ER PENDLETON ISH LOTU DENVER improvements degrade or worsen the LOS S an Saba RES ESSEX FLO A VITR significantly from what it would be in year RAY LONE ST AR WESTFALL St. Mary ’s at : GLASS LAM HEL ST FRA NCIS BOYER 2020 without the complete streets elements. BER PROBANDT T ENA HIGH P ecan ORIENTAL CASS LOWEL L DREXEL DREXEL MISSION BAN The following intersections function at a LOS D CAS S K HAMMOND GROV E OLIVE (yellow), E (red), or F (blue) during one or both PRUITT PINE DRAKE OEL RIGSBY LT KER S ROOSEVE BAYLOR BERKSHIRE S ITO KAYTON ST peak hours for the 2020 Build condition and E CAR AL VE LE HIGHLA G S ND NO HIGHLAND PRESA are shown in the figure at right. WILKEN AVANT S BAILEY MC KAY 0.5 Miles Intersections with LOS D, E, or F during the AM or PM peak hour
  • 17. Downtown Street Design The Downtown Transportation Study assigns each Downtown street one of five street types, EXECUTIVE SUMMARY representing different ways of combining elements from within each part of the street. The five types are Downtown Activity, Downtown Lifestyle, Downtown Essential, Residential, and Principal Route. Page Sixteen Overview of Street Type Characteristics Downtown Downtown Downtown Residential Principal Route Activity Lifestyle Essential   Description Safe, comfortable Safe, comfortable Medium volume Quiet, walkable, High volume corri-Beyond specific near and pedestrian realm access to local and street surrounded by neighborhood dor for accessinglong-term capital improve- for accessing the surrounding destina- a mix of land uses, street Downtownment projects, a guide for core’s mix of uses tions for autos and including industrial,developing street improve- and activities pedestrians distribution, services,ment projects in the future and housingwas produced as part of Design Pedestrian move- Lively public space Pedestrian safety Low traffic, low Corridor capacity,the DTS. This guide aims to emphasis ment, facilities, and compatible with a and accommodation speed, and pedes- route clarity, andprovide a way to identify and adjoining economic variety of adjacent of a mix of vehicles trian safety pedestrian safetyprioritize improvements for activity uses, including urban (buses, trucks, cars, residential and bikes)Downtown streets, outlin-ing a framework for great Where can I Downtown Core Predominantly multi- Generally at the Stable, Connecting majorstreets and using a street find it? family residential intersection of neigh- predominantly destinations zones, particularly borhoods and around single family within and outsidetypology to guide improve- high change, mixed- highway network neighborhoods the Downtownments. A general approach use areasand key concepts in streetdesign, as well as specific Example Houston, Travis, Josephine, Avenue B, Cherry, Chestnut, Lavaca, César Chávez, Frio, Streets Main Ave Labor, Alamo (NE of Probandt King William St. Mary’s, Navarro,recommendations for street 3rd) McCullough,elements and dimensions Martin/Pecan/3rd/based on five unique street Houstontypes are included. Tailored Legendto the unique context of Priority FeaturesDowntown and the proj- Downtown Activity Ample streetside Pedestrian buffers ADA min. clear way Narrow travel Route brandingect study area, the design Downtown Lifestyle Downtown Lifestyle lanesemphasis of each street On-street parking “Flex Zone” Pedestrian buffers On-street parking Route clarity Downtown Essential Do ltype guides the desiredcharacteristics and priority “Flex Zone” Expanded streetside Accommodate larger ADA min. clear Pedestrian inter- Residential Residentialfeatures – and therefore the vehicles way section safety Principal Route Principal Routenecessary investments – to Well-defined edges Formal landscaping Informal landscaping Informal Formalimprove the function and landscaping landscaping Special Streetsdesign of Downtown streets. Pedestrian buffers Informal landscaping Informal Study Area landscaping Pedestrian lighting Pedestrian lighting Pedestrian buffers Formal landscaping Well-defined edges Raised median Bulb-outs

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