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The Low Down: Harvard Referencing

Are
You
Thinking
Purple
Pants?


Jones, T. (2009) How Harvard Referencing
changed my life. Bridgwater. Purple Pants
Publications Ltd
This called a ‘citation’
The importance of correct Harvard referencing is
outlined in Jones (2009)
Whether you are quoting...


Underlining the supreme significance of
Harvard referencing it is important to
understand that you will be guilty of ’ ...


As Trish Jones states in ‘How Harvard
referencing changed my life’



‘Once acquired and understood, this is a life
lo...
1. Author/Editor.
2. Year of publication (if there is no author, the
year should follow the title)
 3. Title in italics.
...



Hawking, S. (2008) Public Lectures: the
beginning of time. [Internet]. Available
from:<http://www.hawking.org.uk/lect...
The sources of images cited in your work should have
bibliographical references to allow them to be located
and to check t...








1. Artist (if known)
2. Year of publication (if there is no author,
the year should follow the title)
3. Ti...



Lee, R. (1940) Rodeo at the Pie Town, New
Mexico Fair. [online image]. Available
at:<http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/inde...







The citation is to where the image was found.
example-from the book you are using it would
go…
‘as can be seen...










Works of art seen in museums/art galleries
1. Artist
2. Title of the work in italics.
3. Year of creati...


Keep a record of all your sources of
information as you go along



Looking them up later is a pain in the Purple
Pant...
A LEVEL TEXTILES CONTEXTUAL PROJECT Harvard referencing
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A LEVEL TEXTILES CONTEXTUAL PROJECT Harvard referencing

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Transcript of "A LEVEL TEXTILES CONTEXTUAL PROJECT Harvard referencing"

  1. 1. The Low Down: Harvard Referencing Are You Thinking Purple Pants?
  2. 2.  Jones, T. (2009) How Harvard Referencing changed my life. Bridgwater. Purple Pants Publications Ltd
  3. 3. This called a ‘citation’ The importance of correct Harvard referencing is outlined in Jones (2009) Whether you are quoting from a book, a website or any other source, it essential to acknowledge the source of all quotations and identify the page numbers if available…
  4. 4.  Underlining the supreme significance of Harvard referencing it is important to understand that you will be guilty of ’ the theft of intellectual property’ (Jones,2009 p 12) if you fail to do so
  5. 5.  As Trish Jones states in ‘How Harvard referencing changed my life’  ‘Once acquired and understood, this is a life long learning skill that will immeasurably enrich the lives of all who use it, and guarantee the approval of teachers, everywhere.’ (Jones, 2009 p 13)
  6. 6. 1. Author/Editor. 2. Year of publication (if there is no author, the year should follow the title)  3. Title in italics.  4. [Internet].  5. Edition.  6. Place of publication (if known)  7. Publisher (if known).  8. Available from: <URL>.  9. [Accessed date].  
  7. 7.   Hawking, S. (2008) Public Lectures: the beginning of time. [Internet]. Available from:<http://www.hawking.org.uk/lectures/lin dex.html> [Accessed 20 August 2008].
  8. 8. The sources of images cited in your work should have bibliographical references to allow them to be located and to check the source and whether they are reproduced or seen in the original ORIGINATOR (artist, photographer) (Year) Description or title of image , then [Online image ].
  9. 9.        1. Artist (if known) 2. Year of publication (if there is no author, the year should follow the title) 3. Title of image, or a description in italics 4. Year of publication. 5. [Online image]. 6. Available at: <URL>. 7. [Accessed date].
  10. 10.   Lee, R. (1940) Rodeo at the Pie Town, New Mexico Fair. [online image]. Available at:<http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.ht ml> [Accessed 18 August 2008].
  11. 11.      The citation is to where the image was found. example-from the book you are using it would go… ‘as can be seen in Watteau’s painting ‘Les deux cousines’. (Brookner, 1967, fig.25) (In the bibliography at the end you reference the work by Brookner, the author, not Watteau the artist.) If you saw the image in a museum or gallery you would cite (Watteau, 1761) because you saw it first hand
  12. 12.          Works of art seen in museums/art galleries 1. Artist 2. Title of the work in italics. 3. Year of creation. 4. Medium. 6. Location 7. Name of the gallery/museum. e.g. Constable, J. The hay wain. (1821), oil on canvas, London: National Gallery.
  13. 13.  Keep a record of all your sources of information as you go along  Looking them up later is a pain in the Purple Pants  Your references must be presented in alphabetical order regardless of the different sources. Together, they form your BIBLIOGRAPHY
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