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Asbestos in Schools:

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Presentation by Keith Kelly to BED10, a Be2camp (Built Environment meets Web 2.0) event, held at Maxwell Winward in London on 30 November 2010.

Presentation by Keith Kelly to BED10, a Be2camp (Built Environment meets Web 2.0) event, held at Maxwell Winward in London on 30 November 2010.

Published in: Business, Technology, Education

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  • 1. @pagroupuk pagroupuk.blogspot.com
  • 2. Asbestos in SchoolsAsbestos in Schools What does the cancellation of BSFWhat does the cancellation of BSF mean for Schools?mean for Schools?
  • 3. Brief History
  • 4. There are aboutThere are about 21,000 Primary Schools21,000 Primary Schools 4000 Secondary Schools4000 Secondary Schools 1500 Special schools1500 Special schools 2500 Independent School2500 Independent School In the United KingdomIn the United Kingdom
  • 5. Assessment of AsbestosAssessment of Asbestos Management in SchoolsManagement in Schools Undertaken by the Asbestos Testing andUndertaken by the Asbestos Testing and Consultants Association (Consultants Association (ATaCATaC)) January 24January 24thth 20102010
  • 6. ““Providing that asbestosProviding that asbestos--containing materials are maintained in goodcontaining materials are maintained in good condition, they can be left where they are and managed until a bcondition, they can be left where they are and managed until a buildinguilding reaches the end of its life.reaches the end of its life.”” ““Although it is worrying to teachers and parents that schools conAlthough it is worrying to teachers and parents that schools containtain asbestos, asbestos does not pose a serious risk if it is managedasbestos, asbestos does not pose a serious risk if it is managed properly inproperly in accordance with the Control of Asbestos Regulations.accordance with the Control of Asbestos Regulations.””11 Letter Minister ofLetter Minister of State for Schools and LearnersState for Schools and Learners RtRt Hon Jim Knight MP 30th April 2009Hon Jim Knight MP 30th April 2009 “We believe that the majority of school employers and particularly local authorities are managing their asbestos responsibly.”2 Letter Minister of State for Schools and Learners Rt Hon Jim Knight MP 27th November 2008
  • 7. “Apart from the fact that the survey was restricted to asbestos management in system built schools, the NUT questions how it can be claimed that the majority of local authorities meet legal requirements in terms of asbestos management when only 42 were actually visited by HSE inspectors. The other 110 simply completed an on-line survey, making the survey essentially a paper exercise, reliant on local authorities admitting to failings in their system of asbestos management in order to trigger a visit from the HSE. A true understanding of the nature of the problem can only be gained when a full independent national audit of all schools is undertaken – something for which the NUT has called many years. “With more and more schools opting out of local authority control, the NUT is concerned that standards of asbestos management will fall further, leading to greater numbers of exposure incidents. We fear also that the findings of this limited survey will be used to justify the abolition of a recently-established DfE steering group which was set up with the aim of improving asbestos management in schools.”
  • 8. Cancelling school building programme putsCancelling school building programme puts children at risk of asbestos exposurechildren at risk of asbestos exposure Kevin Rowan, Regional Secretary of the Northern TUC said: 'Many schools in the region are in a terrible state of disrepair. Teachers, governing bodies, pupils and parents have been waiting desperately for new building work to take place, to allow them to enjoy working and learning in a decent, safe and healthy environment. Now they continue to face risks of serious and potentially fatal hazards due to the lack of investment in the maintenance and improvement of their schools. 'The Government must make funds available now, to all schools who need it, to secure a better and safer environment for children, teachers and school staff alike.' Mick Lyons National Executive Member of The Teacher's Union, NASUWT, for the North East said: 'Asbestos in schools is a ticking time-bomb. Over 190 colleagues have died through asbestos exposure across the country so far, with the unfortunate spectre of many more to come. Scrapping the BSF programme has left older schools - and those who have to spend time in them, extremely vulnerable. Schools are meant to be a place of security and education, not fear of ill-health and bringing the legacy of grave mistakes made pre- 1970s into the 21st century.'
  • 9. Dave PrentisDave Prentis, General Secretary of UNISON, the, General Secretary of UNISON, the UK's largest public sector union, said:UK's largest public sector union, said: ""UNISON welcomes Lord Hill's recognition of theUNISON welcomes Lord Hill's recognition of the need to tackle this problem urgently. We lookneed to tackle this problem urgently. We look forward to working with him to getting to gripsforward to working with him to getting to grips with the true extent of the problem, by playingwith the true extent of the problem, by playing our part in the joint working group due to startour part in the joint working group due to start next month.next month. ““Put simply, there should be no place forPut simply, there should be no place for asbestos in our schools. Children, staff andasbestos in our schools. Children, staff and parents should have the right to know they areparents should have the right to know they are learning in a safe and healthy environment. Butlearning in a safe and healthy environment. But asbestosasbestos -- especially without properespecially without proper managementmanagement -- is anything but safe.is anything but safe. "It is vital that the Government recognises that"It is vital that the Government recognises that asbestos in schools is a health hazard and thatasbestos in schools is a health hazard and that they should take urgent action to have itthey should take urgent action to have it removed, and make sure it is properly managed.removed, and make sure it is properly managed. "With more schools being taken out of local"With more schools being taken out of local authority control, UNISON is deeply concernedauthority control, UNISON is deeply concerned that standards of asbestos managementthat standards of asbestos management -- whichwhich are already seriously failingare already seriously failing -- will decline evenwill decline even further. Schools will not get the help they need tofurther. Schools will not get the help they need to deal with this dangerous problem, and this willdeal with this dangerous problem, and this will sadly lead only to a more children and staffsadly lead only to a more children and staff losing their lives.losing their lives. Unison members protesting at Waltham Forest’s Enforcement notice from the HSE
  • 10. Where now for Schools?
  • 11. @pagroupuk.com pagroupuk.blogspot.com