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ENBE CASE STUDY
 

ENBE CASE STUDY

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    ENBE CASE STUDY ENBE CASE STUDY Document Transcript

    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction to Project For this project, we need to study and analyse on 3 sites found as our context of nature, landscape, space, building, and infrastructure in urban, suburban and rural areas. The 3 sites that we have given are Stadium Merdeka, Bukit Jelutong U8 and Kampung U6. This project is designed to encourage basic understanding of natural and built environment elements. Its objectives include being able to understand and define the elements of natural and built environment in different development of the above three contexts (rural, suburban and urban). Once we successful complete this project, we should be able to differentiate and compare the different development of the built environment through the study of rural, suburban and urban context. We can also learn to analyse and evaluate the different development of the built environment by looking at the natural topography, landscape, space, building and infrastructure. Besides, we can communicate ideas through observation and using different media to present information of the study of natural and built environment Page | 1
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Urban Area Stadium Merdeka Page | 2
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction of Urban Area in Malaysia An urban area is characterized by higher population density and vast human features in comparison to the areas surrounding it. Urban areas may be cities, towns or conurbations, but the term is not commonly extended to rural settlements such as villages and hamlets. Urban areas are created and further developed by the process of urbanization. Measuring the extent of an urban area helps in analysing population density and urban sprawl, and in determining urban and rural populations. Unlike an urban area, a metropolitan area includes not only the urban area, but also satellite cities plus intervening rural land that is socio-economically connected to the urban core city, typically by employment ties through commuting, with the urban core city being the primary labour market. In the US, Metropolitan areas tend to be defined using counties or county sized political units as building blocks of much larger, albeit more condensed population units. Counties tend to be stable political boundaries; economists prefer to work with economic and social statistics based on metropolitan areas. Urbanized areas are a more relevant statistic for determining per capita land usage and densities. Page | 3
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Map of Stadium Merdeka Map 1.1 Page | 4
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Satellite Map of Stadium Merdeka Map 1.2 Page | 5
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction of Stadium Merdeka Figure 1.1 Stadium Merdeka (Independence Stadium)(Figure 1.1) is a sports stadium, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was initially erected for Malaysia's declaration of independence on 31 August 1957. The stadium, operated by Perbadanan Stadium Merdeka, was a venue for many major sporting events prior to its handover to the private company, such as the 1977 Southeast Asian Games and the annual Merdeka Football Tournament (Pesta Bola Merdeka). It also hosted the fight between Muhammad Ali and Joe Bugner on July 1, 1975. It was also used as the venue for concerts, as it is Malaysia's grandest stage for someone to hold a concert here. Although there were many performers who have performed before, but Michael Jackson is the only artist who managed to Page | 6
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas sell out a concert in Stadium Merdeka. The Stadium Negara and the Chin Woo Stadium are located nearby. Stadium Merdeka was constructed from 25 September 1956 to 21 August 1957. It was the site of one of Malaysia's most historically significant events. On 31 August 1957, power was transferred from the British Empire to the newly independent Malayan government.a Tens of thousands of people crowded into the stadium, which was built specifically for this occasion. While the stadium is an important part of Malaysia's history, it was almost demolished in the late 1990s. The stadium and its land were given to a private company which had intended to redevelop the land into a RM1 billion entertainment and office complex. In exchange, the company was required to build seven other stadia in other locations. However, the company did not proceed with the redevelopment due to public outcry and the company's financial difficulties due to the late 1990s Asian economic crisis. In February 2003, Stadium Merdeka was named a national heritage building. In 2007, Merdeka Stadium underwent restoration to its original 1957 condition. The 45,000-capacity stadium has been reduced to 20,000, which meant that several of the upper terrace blocks built over the years had to be demolished. The renovations are part of Malaysia’s 50th anniversary plans to relive the moment when Tunku Abdul Rahman proclaimed independence there. The restoration is expected for completion by December 2009. Page | 7
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Suburban Area Bukit Jelutong Page | 8
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction to Suburban Area in Malaysia A suburban area or as we call it suburb is a residential area or a mixed use area located on the outskirts of a city, either existing as part of a city or urban area such as in Australia, China, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, Vietnam, or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city like inFrance, Kuwait, the United States and Canada. Some suburbs have a degree of administrative autonomy, and most have lower population densities than inner cityneighborhoods. Suburbs first emerged on a large scale in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of improved rail and road transport, which led to an increase in commuting.Suburbs tend to proliferate around cities that have an abundance of adjacent flat land.Any particular suburban area is referred to as a suburb, while suburban areas on the whole are referred to as the suburbs or suburbia, with the demonym for a suburb-dweller being suburbanite. Colloquial usage sometimes shortens the term to burb. Here are some examples of suburban places in Malaysia. First of all, Ampang is very near to KLCC area and attracts many expats, both due to the fact that it has been informally named “Embassy Row” as well as the international schools that are located here. Ampang is home to virtually all of the foreign embassies within KL and many diplomats live near here as well. Housing options in Ampang are diverse, although most condos and apartments are within lower-rise buildings. The construction can vary from new to dated and the streets are generally quiet and safe. There are a reasonable amount of stores for your everyday needs, as well as a couple shopping malls for bigger purchases. Private and international schools in this area are highly acclaimed. Expats will also find a couple of highly rated private Page | 9
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas hospitals in Ampang. Next, Mont Kiara is the typical “suburban lifestyle” neighbourhood. Virtually all of the families who live in Mont Kiara are expats due to the various international schools housed within the area. There are more high-rise condos than any in other suburbs, yet scattered throughout are also townhomes, semi-detached, as well as bungalow style homes. The convenience of shopping malls and services are a-plenty and some find no need to leave the area much at all. Due to the recent popularity of the international schools, one can typically find newer construction more often than not. There are also several serviced apartments here. Many places also boast beautiful views of the KLCC skyline. Page | 10
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Google Map of Bukit Jelutong Map 2.1 Page | 11
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Satellite Map of Bukit Jelutong Map 2.2 Page | 12
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction to Bukit Jelutong U8 Bukit Jelutong is an upscale suburb of Shah Alam, the capital of Selangor state,Malaysia. The suburb is a planned community, with an area of over 2,200 acres (8.9 km2) which is developed by Guthrie Property Holding Berhad (GPHB), a subsidiary company of Sime Darby. Due to the suburb's upscale status, the residential units in Bukit Jelutong are mostly low-density bungalows and duplex houses, as well as some terraced houses. Bukit Jelutong has many parks and open grass areas. Bukit Jelutong is located on a former oil palmplantation, the Bukit Jelutong Estate, which was owned by Kumpulan Guthrie Berhad. The development of Bukit Jelutong began in 1996, with the construction of the Guthrie Pavilion building, the present headquarters of GPHB.Since then, Bukit Jelutong has emerged as a much sought-after address in Shah Alam, with consistently well-received sales launches and price levels of real estate approaching those in more established areas in the Klang Valley, such asPetaling Jaya and Subang Jaya. In July 2005, the Guthrie Corridor Expressway connecting Bukit Jelutong to Rawang opened. Bukit Jelutong has a small commercial center where sundry businesses are located. GPHB had intentionally avoided developing large-scale commercial areas to avoid traffic congestion and noise to maintain the suburb's atmosphere of serenity and exclusivity. Nonetheless, Bukit Jelutong has close proximity to the Tesco and Giantstores, which are located just outside the suburb next to the GCE. The Bukit Jelutong Industrial Park is located in the eastern outskirts of Bukit Jelutong. It is a low-density industrial park hosting low-pollution, hi-techindustries as Page | 13
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas well as logistics warehousing and service facilities. The tenants are mostly multinational corporations from various industries, such as Xixili, Scania, ThyssenKrupp and Schenker AG. Besides the abundance of parks, Bukit Jelutong is also notable for its proximity to several golf courses and country clubs. These include the Kelab Golf Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah, the Glenmarie Golf & Country Club, the Monterez Golf & Country Club, and the Saujana Golf & Country Club. The Shah Alam Stadium is also only a 5-minute drive away from Bukit Jelutong. The Bukit Jelutong community has proven to be a close community judging from its regular events. The main yearly event is the Bukit Jelutong Carnival held annually. The Carnival is organised by the Bukit Jelutong Residents Association Registered in 2002, Bukit Jelutong Residents Association is very active. Regular events benefiting the residents are held regularly. Driven entirely by volunteers who are residents of Bukit Jelutong, the association is known for its close rapport with the local authorities. Page | 14
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Rural Area Kampung U6 Page | 15
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction to Rural Area In general, a rural area is a geographic area that is located outside cities and towns. A rural area is an open swath of land that has few homes or other buildings, and not very many people. A rural areas population density is very low. Many people live in a city, or urban area. Their homes and businesses are located very close to one another. In a rural area, there are fewer people, and their homes and businesses are located far away from one another. According to a World Bank report published in 2012, the population of rural area in Malaysia decreased from 7,855,800 to 7,788,932 due to the year from 2008 to 2012. Here are some examples of rural area in Malaysia. First of all, Tambunan is a valley district located in the Interior Division of the state of Sabah. It covers an area of 1,347 km2. Almost the entire population are Dusun, while the rest are Malay, Chinese and other Sabahan ethnic groups. It is located 80 kilometers east of Kota Kinabalu, capital of Sabah. Next, Pulau Indah is an island off the west coast of Selangor, Malaysia. The West Port of Port Klang is located here. It was formerly known as PulauLumut, an island where visitors can experience life in a traditional Malay village. This is the best place to enjoy the rustic and laidback charms of kampung (village) life, set amidst lush greenery and the Straits of Malacca. Pulau Indah is also the location of Klang's new West Port and cruise terminal. This West Port is almost for commercial and industrial hub of the country as well as the country's most populous region ensures that the port plays a pivotal role in the economic development of the country. Based on a Government directive in 1993, Port Klang is currently being developed as the National Load Centre and eventually a hub for the region. Before the SelatLumut bridge connecting Pulau Indah to Port Page | 16
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Klang was completed in 1994, it was a sleepy rural island with fishing villages, mangrove swamps and some orang asli inhabitants. Third, JandaBaik is a small village in Pahang, Malaysia. It is about 30 km from Kuala Lumpur, capital of Malaysia. There is a simple Malay kampong or village with a population of approximately 1000 people. A peaceful village surrounded with untouchable natural tropical rain forest at altitude of 600–800 m above sea level. Almost all the accommodation in the area is able to organize motivational courses, as well as various obstacle challenges such as the ever popular jungle trekking, waterfalls, water rafting, off road 4 wheel drive, flying fox and abseiling. Camping grounds are available. Figure 3.1 Figure 3.2 Figures (Figure 3.1 and 3.2) show the example of rural area in Malaysia. Page | 17
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Map of Kampung U6, Shah Alam Map 3.1 Page | 18
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Satellite Map of Kampung U6, Shah Alam Map 3.2 Page | 19
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Introduction to Kampung U6 On 7th October, my group members and I went to Kampung U6 for this assignment. We had taken a lot of photos at there. We were just focused on the buildings as we had chosen that as our main topic. Kampung U6 is a simple traditional kampong or small village with a population approximately 1000 people and was categorized as an upscale suburb of Shah Alam, the capital of Selangor state, Malaysia. Kampung U6 is located near the previous airport, Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport. It is located near our suburban site too which is Bukit Jelutong. But, the population is almost different from each other. There is also a rural area near Kampung U6 which is PekanSubang. There is not much commercial building at Kampung U6, just have some residential buildings. All the buildings are old and don’t have any renovation on them. At rural site, there is not much educational or any religious building. On the other hand, as we can see, the infrastructure at Kampung U6 is rarely found due to the less development from the authorities at there. According to the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 1996, the roads, electricity supplies, telecommunication and other infrastructure services are limited in all rural areas. Therefore, the authorities in Malaysia like FELDA have started their projects to develop and improve the quality of living spaces in rural areas. Page | 20
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Buildings Page | 21
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 1. Commercial buildings Commercial building is a building that is used for commercial use. The technical classification of a commercial building for zoning purposes is that it has more than half of its floor space used for commercial activities. 1. Urban area In urban locations, a commercial building often combines functions, such as an office on levels 2-10, with retail on floor 1. Local authorities commonly maintain strict regulations on commercial zoning, and have the authority to designate any zoned area as such. A business must be located in a commercial area or area zoned at least partially for commerce. Figure 4.1 This (Figure 4.1) is Petaling Street which is located near PasarSeni. This commercial building used for attraction for tourist. Page | 22
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.2 The view of Petaling Street Figure 4.3 Berjaya Times Square Kuala Lumpur is a 48-storey, 203 m (666 ft) twin tower, hotel, condominium, indoor amusement park and shopping centre complex in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Page | 23
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.4 Plaza Low Yat (often abbreviated PLY), is a shopping centre specializing in electronics and IT products in Malaysia. In year 2009, Plaza Low Yat was named “Malaysia’s Largest IT Lifestyle Mall” by the Malaysia Book of Records. Figure 4.5 Top of view Plaza Low Yat Page | 24
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.6 Pavilion Kuala Lumpur(Figure 4.6) is a shopping mall situated in the Bukit Bintang district in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was built on the former site of Bukit Bintang Girls' School, the oldest school in Kuala Lumpur which was moved to Cheras as Sekolah Seri Bintang Utara in 2000.[3] Opened on 20 September 2007, it consists of four major components: a retail mall, an office tower, two residential and a proposed hotel. The total size of Kuala Lumpur Pavilion is 1,400,000 square feet. Page | 25
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Suburban area These are the commercial buildings found in Bukit Jelutong U8. Figure 4.7 Figure 4.7 shows the shop lots that are built near to the entrance of Bukit Jelutong U8. Some are still under renovation but the others are already for sale or rental. It can also be used as office buildings according to the desire of the person who buys the lot. Page | 26
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.8 This lot shown in the figure above is renovated into a warehouse. Figure 4.9 These are a another new trendy shop lots named d’Vida (Figure 4.9). There are some shops that are opened for business while some are still for rental. The environment of these shop lots is very “green” which there are a lot of little trees and bushes around it. It brings the nature to the people who come by. Page | 27
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.10 New trendy “green” shop lots. Figure 4.11 Another shop lot with a security guard room. Page | 28
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.12Mydin Mini Market Figure 4.13 Figure 4.13 shows Plaza U8 that is one of a commercial building of Sime Darby Property. Page | 29
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Rural area In rural area such as Kampung U6, the commercial buildings are not as much as in urban area. They are almost very old and even don’t do any renovation. There won’t be any particular parking lot for the cars. There are many kinds of hardware shop too. Figure 4.14 Figure 4.14 shows a shop in Kampung U6,ShahAlam. There is no parking lot for the cars until all the cars are crowded in front of the shop. Page | 30
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.15 Figure 4.15 shows a “Nippon Paint” shop in Kampung U6,ShahAlam. Although it is old, the owner doesn’t want to do any renovation on it. The material is not be move away after the construction and just put in front of the shop. Figure 4.16 Figure 4.16 shows one of the hardware shops at Kampung U6, Shah Alam. It is surrounded with fence and doesn’t have any parking lot too. Page | 31
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Residential buildings A residential area is a land use in which housing predominates, as opposed to industrial and commercial areas. Housing may vary significantly between, and through, residential areas. These include single-family housing, multi-family residential, or mobile homes. 1. Suburban area Residential buildings are buildings built on a land that is used forhousing predominates, as opposed to industrial and commercial areas. Housing may vary significantly between, and through, residential areas. These include single-family housing, multi-family residential, or mobile homes. Zoning for residential use may permit some services or work opportunities or may totally exclude business and industry. It may permit high density land use or only permit low density uses. Residential zoning usually includes a smallerfloor area ratiothan business, commercial, industrial or manufacturing zoning. The area may be large or small. Figure 4.17 Figure 4.18 These are residential housing area (Figure 4.17 & Figure 4.18) built on top of a low hill slope which is located in Lagenda housing estate (Figure 4.19). Page | 32
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.19 Figure 4.20 Next up, there is another housing estate on flat surface further inside the area of Bukit Jelutong shown in Figure 4.20 above. These houses are designed as semidetached houses. It has a big field right beside the houses. It is a good environment for families to come and spend their family time here like playing football, badminton, kite-flying and so on. There are also sidewalk pathways for the residence to have a stroll or go for jogging. Page | 33
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas These condos are built right on top of a small hill at the other end of the d’Vida shop lots. The residences there can walk down to the shops since it is so near. (Figure 4.21) Figure 4.21 Figure 4.22 In Figure 4.22 are another residential houses built on a higher hill and it is built in an open space. These houses will be more costly due to the materials and design of the houses that are used. These are also semi-detached houses. Page | 34
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.23 Figure 4.23 shows the bungalows residential area in Bukit Jelutong. Page | 35
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Rural area In certain residential areas, largely rural, large tracts of land may have no services, thus residents seeking services must use a motor vehicle or other transport, so the need for transport has resulted in land development following existing or planned transport infrastructure such as rail and road. Figure 4.24 Figure 4.24 shows that there is full with water pipes outside the house. We won’t see this situation in any suburban and urban area. This shows the characteristic of rural area. Page | 36
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.25 The house is found at Kampung U6, Shah Alam. The house is made of wood, same with other house at there. Besides, the house is far from the other house. Figure 4.26 Figure 4.27 Figure 4.26 and 4.27 show a bungalow at Kampung U6, Shah Alam. In front of the bungalow, we can see a lorry that carries sand to the construction industry. There is a bus station in front of the bungalow to accommodate the resident to work. Page | 37
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Educational buildings Educational building is a building designed for various activities in a primary, secondary, or higher educational system and often including living areas for students, such as dormitories. 1. Urban area An educational building which near Stadium Negara. This educational building is used for education use by the student. These educational building is at along Jalan Hang Jebat. Figure 4.28 Page | 38
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Suburban area Educational buildings are buildings that provide education to the people. Figure 4.29 Figure 4.29 shows the Real Kid Kindergarten in Bukit Jelutong. It consists of a big space for kids to play during their recess. It has a windmill country design and the walls are painted with a colorful design which will give the children a happy environment to study in. Page | 39
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 4.30 Secondary School named SekolahKebagsaan Bukit Jelutong. Page | 40
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Rural area Figure 4.31 Figure shows that a primary school named SJK(C) Subang at Kampung U6, Shah Alam. Majority of residents at Kampung U6 will send their children to this school because this is the nearest school at there. Page | 41
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 4. Government Building 1. Urban area Figure 4.32 The Pudu Prison (Figure 4.32) was a prison in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Built in phases by the British colonial government between 1891 and 1895, it stood on Jalan Shaw (now Jalan Hang Tuah.] The construction began with its 394-metre prison wall at a cost of Straits $16,000, and had been adorned with the world's longest mural at one point in its history. The cells were small and dark, each equipped with a window only the size of a shoebox. As of December 2012, the prison complex was largely demolished, leaving only the main gate and a portion of the exterior wall still standing. Page | 42
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Stadium Negara Figure 4.33 Stadium Negara (Figure 4.33) is a stadium in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and was the first indoor stadium in the country. Construction began in 1960 and the stadium officially opened in 10 April 1962, by third Yang di-PertuanAgongAlmarhumTuanku Syed Putra, of Perlis. It is across the road from Stadium Merdeka Page | 43
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 5. Religious Buildings 1. Suburban area Figure 4.34 Figure 4.35 Not far from this housing estate, an Islamic mosque named Masjid TengkuAmpuan Jemaah Bukit Jelutong, is built for the Muslims who lives in the area to come for prayers. The mosque has a spacious car park around the whole mosque and a wide space to organize activities during festive seasons or special occasions. It is shown in Figure 4.34 and Figure 4.35. Page | 44
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Infrastructure Page | 45
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 1. Urban area Infrastructure refers to basic physical and organizational structures needed for the operation of a society or enterprise, or the services and facilities necessary for an economy to function. It is an important term for judging a country or region's development. the technical structure that support a community, such as water supply, roads, bridges, sewers, telecommunication and so on. Residence could get clean water supply compare to other sub-urban or rural area. Our country has our own water supply system that named SYABAS. It is a private company that holding the concession for the water supply for the states. The roads and highways of Kuala Lumpur are very advanced and convenient. However, improvement can still be made. Bridges in Kuala Lumpur that connects with outstate which enable citizens to travel in a shorter distance that can avoid traffic jam. There are also many Page | 46
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas underground tunnel in Kuala Lumpur especially below the highways. Underground tunnel help to control the amount of the car and also the flow of the traffic. MRT which is integrated railway network expected will done by this coming year of 2014. This will serve a corridor with a population of 1.2 million linking them to the heart of Kuala Lumpur. For the telecommunication part, there are more advanced in Kuala Lumpur. The sewer in Kuala Lumpur is well planned that you can rarely sawflooded around the area. Besides that, the internet speed is a lot faster than rural area. Citizens in Kuala Lumpur usually communicate through online chatting by using application such as Whatsapp, Wechat, and Line. Page | 47
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Suburban area Figure 2.19 The above figure shows the sign board of Bukit Jelutong U8. It is placed on a big piece of land which will catch the view of the passerby. At the back you can see there are streetlights along the sidewalks. This service is provided by the MPSA for the residences in Bukit Jelutong. Page | 48
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 2.20 Figure 2.20 shows the highways that are leading to three different sections which is shown on the sign board on the top of the highways. The first section leads to Klang, Kuala Lumpur International Airport and Johor Bahru, The second section leads to Damansara City, Selangor Village and the Buloh River. While the third section leads to Ipoh, Pahang and UTARA. Page | 49
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 2.21 Another view of the highways of Bukit Jelutong Figure 2.22 is one of a playground in one of the residence of Bukit Jelutong. Rubbish bins are provided for the people to throw rubbish in instead of littering it them around the area. Parents can bring their children out to have a playtime and there are sidewalks designed for people to jog around the park. Figure 2.22 Page | 50
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 2.23 is another view of the park and playground. There are also concrete benches around the park for people to sit down and have a rest. There is also a number of streetlights provided so that the park will not be pitch black at night. Figure 2.23 Figure 2.24 In Figure 2.24, the road in front of the school is widely constructed so that it will not be severely jammed when the parents come to fetch their children from school. Road signs are also put around the area to inform the drivers to follow the road rules especially in school areas. Page | 51
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 2.25 Another road sign in the school area. Page | 52
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 2.26 Figure 2.26 is the bus station right outside of the secondary school of Bukit Jelutong, SekolahKebangsaan Bukit Jelutong. It helps to keep the sun out and avoid getting wet when it rains for the students. Figure 2.27 shows a security tow that ensures the safety of the residences. Outsiders are not allowed to simply drive into the housing estate before answering to the security guard. Outsiders or visiters are allowed to have drop off or visit. Figure 2.27 Page | 53
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Rural area Figure 3.13 Figure 3.13 shows that there is no traffic light along the road. The number of cars at Kampung U6 is not as more as at any suburban or urban areas so the government does not build any traffic light at there. Page | 54
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 3.14 Figure 3.14 shows that there is a street lamp in front of the Nippon Paint. This is because the government wants to ensure that the cars driven at night won’t be crushed into the construction material at there. At Kampung U6, the numbers of street light are very less on the road because the villagers are seldom going out at night. However, it can be found at the entrance of the main road because the road is narrow and curve. So, the street light can help to avoid the accidents happen. Page | 55
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 3.15 Figure 3.15 shows that there is a signboard at the entrance of temple to show the direction to those who want to go there. It can always be found at the side of the road. Figure 3.16 shows that Chevron (arrowhead) safety sign beside the road. Most of them are placed at the sharp corner of the road to remind the drivers to drive slowly and carefully. Figure 3.16 Page | 56
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Nature Page | 57
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 1. Urban area Figure 6.1 Nature, in the broadest sense, is equivalent to the natural, physical, or material world or universe. "Nature" refers to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general. It ranges in scale from the subatomic to the cosmic. During our trip to Kuala Lumpur, we found that the place lack of greenery. This is because the city is fully developed with high rise building, hotel, shopping centre, skyscrapers and many more. There is less nature to be seen, since the places is fully crowded by transportation, population of the people and tourist and so on. Temperature barely below 30°C due to the number of transportation increase everyday. The air also full of carbon monoxide that you can be seen in the air. Flooding is the most common problem that face by people in Kuala Lumpur whenever is heavy rain. Page | 58
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Suburban area Figure 6.2 The owner of this house has planted a lot of trees around the house. It brings out the natural beauty of the green environment. Page | 59
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 6.3 The owner of this house not only planted greenery around his house’s front yard, there is also three silver plating traditional kite called “wau” as a decoration at the front yard of the house. Page | 60
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Rural area Figure 6.4 Figure 6.3 shows that rural areas has more empty lands compared to suburban areas, most of it are still forest or being used for plantations like farms. There are trees everywhere at every direction. This is because not many lands in rural areas are well developed as the population is very low. Page | 61
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Landscape Page | 62
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 1. Urban area Figure 7.1 Landscape includes the visible features of an area of land, including the physical elements of landforms such as (ice-capped) mountains, hills, water bodies such as rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, living elements of land cover including native vegetation, human elements including different forms of land use, buildings and structures, and transitory elements such as lighting and weather conditions. For our country Kuala Lumpur is the most advanced economy compare to the other state. As our country moves forward to the developing status, Kuala Lumpur has experienced a rapid growth in the city construct. In many respects, urban design has both the functional and aesthetic aspects for the city’s built environment. Kuala Lumpur is also known as vibrant multi-cultural society, therefore, the considerations of urban designs is needed. The landscape design of Kuala Lumpur helps to create living Page | 63
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas synthesis of people and place vital to local and national identity, which enable people to identify more understand and move closer with the city. Thus, fostering a social harmony. However, the developments of urban areas sometimesis thoughtless to their context and have not integrated successfully with the surrounding areas which are lack of greenery. We have to create an environment which is functional and liveable, safe, clean, aesthetically pleasing and user friendly, offering a high level of climatic comfort and sense of well-being. Page | 64
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Suburban area Figure 7.2 Figure shows a landscape of a river that is located in Bukit Jelutong. Boulders, rocks and small pebbles are placed on top of every level. There is even a small island in the river. There are many trees on the hill slope. Bars are placed around the river so that people will not fall into to it for their own safety. There is also a staircase leading up to a residential estate. The residence there can come down and have a stroll along the river. Page | 65
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 7.3 This pathway shown in the above figure has a curve slope. The sidewalk is constructed accordingly to the landscape of the slope. This sidewalk is constructed mainly for people to go for jogging or strolls to the park. Around the area, there are many trees and shrubs so when the residences are jogging they will not feel so hot but there will be cool breezes instead. Page | 66
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 7.4 Figure is the backyard of the housing estates built on a lower hill slope. It is a big field and trees can be planted there. Children can come and play around here. Page | 67
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 7.5 This is a flat surface of the newly refurnished road of Bukit Jelutong. The road is very wide and it looks very spacious. Page | 68
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Rural area Figure 7.3 Figure 7.3 shows that there is a rocky road at Kampung U6. Due to less development, there are a lot of rocky road at rural area. These roads are suitable for the lorry to carry the sand and other construction material to the site. Page | 69
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Space Page | 70
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 1. Urban area Figure 8.1 Around Kuala Lumpur, there is no greenery to be seen since afterKuala Lumpur is the cultural, financial and economic centre of Malaysia due to its position as the capital as well as being a key city. Kuala Lumpur was ranked 48th among global cities by Foreign Policy's 2010 Global Cities Index and was ranked 67th among global cities for economic and social innovation by the 2thinknow Innovation Cities Index in 2010. because all of the place have been developed. In Kuala Lumpur, you only can see tall building which like skyscrapers, hotel, high rise building, shopping mall and many more. Thus, it brings many benefits to our economic and also the people who lived in Kuala Lumpur. The developed of Kuala Lumpur also has advanced technology, LRT, STAR and MONORAIL that connect everywhere so that you can get whatever you want. However, nothing is perfect; there are also unwanted Page | 71
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas consequences after the development of Kuala Lumpur. Kuala Lumpur have the worst traffic jam during office hour. Imagine that the traffic jam can stuck in the jam on the road for 1 hour without moving more than 30 metres. Not only that, it also causes a lot of case of accident. Beside that, Kuala Lumpur have a lot of crime case that you cannot expected with it. Furthermore, the temperature in Kuala Lumpur is higher than the other state due to the number of cars everyday. There are also some irresponsible citizens that spit, litters around the area. Page | 72
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 2. Suburban area Figure 8.2 This is a very big field right next to the semi-detached housing estate. There is a small drainage-like river around the field. This field can be turned into football field for the residences to come and play during their free time. (Figure 8.2) Page | 73
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 8.3 Another open space is spotted in one part of Bukit Jelutong. This space can be designed into aa park or shop lots. Other than that, it can also be constructed into more housing estate. Page | 74
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Figure 8.4 This big field is located opposite of the Sime Darby Property Building and Masjid TengkuAmpuan Jemaah Bukit Jelutong. It is very huge land which it can be constructed into a shopping mall. Figure 8.5 City view from a hill of Bukit Jelutong Page | 75
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 3. Rural area Figure 8.6 Figure 8.6 shows that open space at the Kampung U6. It is designed as a runway for the airport. Page | 76
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Comparison between Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Human settlement areas are classified depending on lot of things, countries, urban, suburban and rural. The common way to classify a residential area is according to urban, suburban and rural. The population in Malaysia is concentrated largely in urban area. Urban area is built-up and populated area that generally has a population of 200,000 or more. It can be city or town. Lifestyle in urban areas is considered to be fast paced, people are often having an active social life. Buildings are often closer together and built higher than those in suburban or rural areas. Economy in urban areas is the backbone of the economy of a country due to the rise of industry. The rise of industry have provided more jobs opportunities and encouraged more people to migrate to the cities. Urban areas often have some form of public transportation, such as buses, subways, or trains to accommodate the resident to work. Suburban surround major cities and are typically made up of single-family detached residences, and typically have more green space and a lowerpopulation density than the urban area. Compared to urban areas, suburban areas usually have lower population density, lower standards of living, less complex road systems, less franchised stores and restaurants, and more farmland and wildlife. Suburban areas have been continuously expanding further from the city. Suburban areas can offer a different lifestyle than the urban areas. Transportation of suburban area plays an important role in the life of a suburban resident. Suburbs typically have longer travel times to work than traditional neighborhoods. This is due to the poor suburban systems, longer travel distances and the inefficiency of traffic distributing. Page | 77
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Rural areas are characterized with having small, tight communities. Rural areas are classified according to their small population and having farming abilities. It is an open swatch of the land that has few homes or other buildings and it has a very low density of population. Many people in rural areas are considered to be farmers. Rural areas are more community based people and depend on social gatherings and other similar events. Their homes and business are located far away from one another. The roads, electricity supplies, telecommunication and other infrastructure services are limited in all rural areas. This is due to the less development from the authorities. Page | 78
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Comparison between the building in Kampung U6, Bukit Jelutong and Stadium Merdeka. After discussing with our group member, we decided to focus on the study of type of building between the rural area, sub-urban area and urban area. We were assigned three site which are Kampung U6 (rural), Bukit Jelutong (sub-urban) and Stadium Merdeka area (urban). In Kampung U6, most of the building are very old and the arrangement are scattered and not organized. Most of the design of the buildings are classic design. Some of the old building are built with timber and the roof with zinc. These building seems very fragile. Apart from this, there are also building that built with concrete. There are 3type of building in the Kampung U6 which are the houses, industrial buildings and shop lots. As you can see that most of the residents in the village are works in industry area or trading and of course some of them are farmer. Page | 79
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Lets discuss about the building in sub-urban area, Bukit Jelutong. Bukit Jelutong is a small town which is located 30km away from the KL city center. The lifestyle in Bukit Jelutong is much more relax compare to the hectic lifestyle in KL as you can see from their building. There are no high rise building in Bukit Jelutong but beautiful residential houses with a lot of landscape inside it. Most of the building are built with a modern design concept. Therefore, we can conclude that Bukit Jelutong is a new well developed area. The residential houses are mostly low-density bungalows and duplex houses and some terraced houses. There are also a super market and some shop lot in the Bukit Jelutong to provide daily need for the residents who live there. The Stadium Merdeka area which located in the main city of our country, Kuala Lumpur. Of course, it is urban area. There are numerous of high rise building and skyscraper in the area. Most of the building are modern, well organized and big. There are shopping centre in around that area too. There has very few residential building because most of the area are used for commercial activity. There are abundant of infrastructure available in the urban area such as monorail, shopping centre, bus station, stadium, etc. It is also a tourism area. Most of the old buildings in the area were demolished to build new building and some new infrastructure. Although most of the old building demolished for development but some of the historical building are left witness the development of our lovely country. One of the Page | 80
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas example is the Pudu Prison. Only the main gate and part of the exterior are left as signify of this 100years historical building. Page | 81
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Group Photo Page | 82
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Conclusion After our case study, we have conducted that there are very much differences in the context of buildings in urban, suburban and rural area. The differences are quite obvious especially when we compare the urban area, Stadium Merdeka with rural area, Kampung U6. As for suburban area, Bukit Jelutong, there are slight differences in the context of building as compared to Stadium Merdeka. We have divided our task to complete the case study. However, we have visited the three sites given together. After divided the task, Thun Shao Xun does urban parts, suburban for Yvonne, rural for Shun Qi andAlgel does the other parts. In the context of building, we can see that Kampung U6 is the less developed compared to Bukit Jelutong and Stadium Merdeka. Kampung U6 has a very scattered and random setting whereas Bukit Jelutong and Stadium Merdeka are well planned and developed. Kampung U6 does not have specific places being focused for development, nevertheless, most of them are left to be in their natural and original condition. Page | 83
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Reference Author unknown.(2013). Rural, Suburban, and Urban Background Information & Activities. Retrieved 18 October 2013, from http://www.brainpopjr.com/socialstudies/communities/ruralsuburba nandurban/grownups.weml Author unknown.(2013). Pulau Indah. Retrieved 18 October 2013, from http://www.malaysia-traveller.com/pulau-indah.html Author unkonwn. (22 September 2013). Industrial architecture. Retrieved 22 October 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_building Author unkonwn.( 20 October 2013). Residential area. Retrieved 22 October 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residential_building Author unknown. (24 October 2013). iProperty. d'Vida@BukitJelutong. Retrieved 23 October 2013, from http://www.iproperty.com.my/developments/developmentreview.aspx?pid=155 Author unknown. (15 October 2013). Bukit Jelutong. Retrieved 22 October 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bukit_Jelutong 5. Author unknown.(24 October 2013). Space U8, Bukit Jelutong. Retrieved 23 October 2013, from http://www.propwall.my/bukit_jelutong/space_u8 Page | 84
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Author unknown. (20 October 2013). Stadium Negara. Retrieved 22 October 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadium_Negara Author unknown. (17 August 2013). Pudu Prison. Retrieved 23 October 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pudu_Jail Author unknown. (29 April 2013). Plaza Low Yat. Retrieved 23 October 2013, from http://plazalowyat.com/ Author unknown. (11 October 2013). List of building types. Retrieved 23 October 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_building_types Author unknown. (14 April 2013).Commercial building. Retrieved 23 October 2013, fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial_building Author unknown.(2013). Urban population (% of total) in Malaysia. Retrieved 22 October 2013, from http://www.tradingeconomics.com/malaysia/urbanpopulation-percent-of-total-wb-data.html Author unknown. (2013). Pavilion KL. Retrieved 21 October 2013, from http://www.wonderfulmalaysia.com/pavilion-kl-shopping-mall-kualalumpur.htm Page | 85
    • Case Study of Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas Page | 86