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Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4
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Evolutionary coaching summit presentation v4

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Presentation on Evolutionary Coaching

Presentation on Evolutionary Coaching

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  • 1. Evolutionary Coaching
  • 2. Evolutionary Coaching “This is a book for all coaches. But, it is not a book about the skills and techniques of coaching: It is a book about the framework of human development that coaches need to be familiar with in order to facilitate the full emergence of their client’s potential.” Richard Barrett May 2014
  • 3. Evolutionary Coaching No matter what type of coach you are, it is important to recognize that every individual you are working with is on an evolutionary journey—a natural journey of psychological development that is common to every member of the human race. Where your clients are on that journey significantly affects their goals and the ways in which they respond to their life challenges.
  • 4. Questions we will be addressing in this webinar 1. What is Evolutionary Coaching? 2. How is Evolutionary Coaching different? 3. What prevents people from evolving? 4. Some examples of exercises and surveys
  • 5. What is Evolutionary Coaching? A way of understanding where someone is on their evolutionary journey of psychological development and what internal and external factors are preventing or blocking their progress. Evolutionary coaching brings an overarching context to the goals and objectives of the individuals you are coaching.
  • 6. What is Evolutionary Coaching? Let’s start with some definitions
  • 7. Exercises The exercises included in the book Evolutionary Coaching help you identify your clients’ primary motivation; and what secondary motivations they have that are blocking or preventing them from growing and developing. The exercises also help you to evaluate to what extent the cultures (world views) your clients are embedded in are supporting or preventing their evolutionary development.
  • 8. At any given moment in time, what is most important to us is the satisfaction of the needs of the stage of psychological development we have reached (our primary motivation), and the unmet needs of the stages of psychological development we have passed through which we have not yet fully mastered (our secondary motivations). What motivates us is the satisfaction of our needs.
  • 9. Stages of Psychological Development Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. EvolutionofPersonalConsciousness Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 10. Stages of Psychological Development (Child) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 0-2 years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 11. Stages of Psychological Development (Child) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 3-7 years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 12. Stages of Psychological Development (Young Adult) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 8-29 years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 13. Stages of Psychological Development (Adult) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 30-39 years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 14. Stages of Psychological Development (Adult) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 40-49 years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 15. Stages of Psychological Development (Adult) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 50-59 years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 16. Stages of Psychological Development (Adult) Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. 60+ years Needs/Primary Motivations
  • 17. Stages, Levels and World Views o We grow in stages of psychological development o We operate at levels of consciousness o We live inside (are embedded in) cultural world views
  • 18. Stages, Levels and World Views All things being normal, the level of consciousness we operate from will correspond to the stage of psychological development we have reached.
  • 19. What We Value at Each Level of Consciousness Financial stability, wealth, employment opportunities, health and safety. Open communication, friendship, loyalty, caring, recognition, tradition, rituals. Pride, productivity, efficiency, quality, professional growth, confidence, excellence. Independence, adaptability, continuous learning, personal growth, balance, adventure, courage. Trust, fairness, honesty, integrity, openness, transparency, enthusiasm, commitment. Collaboration, alliances, environmental awareness, personal fulfilment, empathy. Social responsibility, social justice, wisdom, compassion, humility, forgiveness, ecology. Survival: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Relationship: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Self-esteem: Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Transformation: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cultural conditioning that no longer align with who you are. Internal cohesion: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Making a difference : Learning how to align with those who share the same values/purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. Levels of Consciousness
  • 20. Basic Needs and Growth Needs Growth Needs (Being Needs) Basic Needs (Deficiency Needs) A basic need is something that is important to get, have or experience in order to feel physically and emotionally safe in your framework of existence. These are the needs associated with the first three stages of psychological development. Abraham Maslow referred to them as “deficiency” needs. You feel anxious and fearful when you are unable to satisfy your basic needs, but once they are met, you no longer pay them much attention. Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cultural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. A growth need is something that enables you to feel a sense of internal alignment. Abraham Maslow referred to these as “being” needs: a way of being in the world, with minimal fear and anxiety that allows you to feel a sense of alignment with who you really are at the deepest level of your being. When you are able to satisfy your growth needs, they do not go away, they engender deeper levels of commitment Transformation Primary Motivations
  • 21. Child/Teenage Stages of Development – Basic Needs Basic Needs Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Primary Motivations
  • 22. Transition and Transformation Growth Needs Basic Needs Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are.Transition Primary Motivations
  • 23. Adult Stages of Development – Growth Needs Growth Needs Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. Primary Motivations
  • 24. Basic Needs and Growth Needs Growth Needs Basic Needs Surviving: Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Conforming: Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Differentiating: Learning to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Individuating: Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cult- ural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Self-actualizing: Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Integrating: Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Serving: Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. Transformation Needs/ Primary Motivations
  • 25. What prevents us from focusing on our primary motivation? 1. The unmet needs of the stages of development we have passed through which we have not yet mastered—our secondary motivations. 2. The stages of development (World Views) of the cultures in which we are embedded (family, community, organisation and society) which are at a lower level of consciousness.
  • 26. Our unmet needs arise from the parental programming and cultural conditioning of our childhood and teenage years By the time we reach physical maturity we are the prisoners of our parental programming and cultural conditioning. The persona we display to the world is not our unique self, but our false self: a self with a socialized mind; a self that did its best to survive and stay safe in its physical and cultural framework of existence. What happens to most of us is our unique self—the person we were born to become—gets pushed into the background.
  • 27. Evolutionary Coaching The job of an evolutionary coach is twofold: a) To help clients understand which stage of development they are at. b) To help clients break down the bars of the prisons they have constructed (parental programming and cultural conditioning) so they can unmask their false selves, discover their true selves and grow and develop the inborn gifts and talents of their unique selves; and, c) To help clients evaluate to what extent the cultures they are embedded in are helping or hindering them in meeting their needs, and support them in taking appropriate actions. Individuation Self-actualisation Primary focus will normally be on:
  • 28. Powerful metrics that enable leaders to measure and manage cultures. www.valuescentre.com 28 Exercises: Identifying your Primary Motivation Note down which motivation you most resonate with. My primary motivation exercise Pick out the motivation that you most resonate with, particularly with regard to your working life. Motivation 1: I am primarily motivated by my need to achieve financial security, provide for myself, and my family and keep myself and them safe from harm. Motivation 2: I am primarily motivated by my need to find a place in the world where I feel I belong and where I feel respected for who I am. Motivation 3: I am primarily motivated by my need to feel recognised and acknowledged for my skills and talents and to have opportunities to excel at what I do best. Motivation 4: I am primarily motivated by my need for autonomy and independence, to have challenges that test me and adventures that cause me to grow. Motivation 5: I am primarily motivated by my need to find meaningful work or a meaningful occupation that aligns with my sense of purpose or the things I am passionate about. Motivation 6: I am primarily motivated by my need to make a difference through my daily activities and collaborate with other people who share a similar sense of purpose. Motivation 7: I am primarily motivated by my need to support and serve those around me in the pursuit of their purposes and help them find fulfilment in their lives.
  • 29. Powerful metrics that enable leaders to measure and manage cultures. www.valuescentre.com 29 Exercises: Identifying your Primary Motivation Note down which motivations has the most values/behaviours. My primary motivation exercise Pick out the ten values/behaviours you most resonate with particularly with regard to your working life. Motivation 1: Survival, safety, control, wealth, financial stability, job security. Motivation 2: Belonging, friendship, respect, loyalty, caring, harmony. Motivation 3: Excellence, status, pride, achievement, recognition, continuous improvement. Motivation 4: Autonomy, challenges, adaptability, accountability, continuous learning. Motivation 5: Meaning, purpose, integrity, fairness, commitment, creativity, trust. Motivation 6: Making a difference, coaching, mentoring, collaboration, sustainability. Motivation 7: Compassion, humility, future generations, ecology, social justice, service.
  • 30. Powerful metrics that enable leaders to measure and manage cultures. www.valuescentre.com 30 Motivation 1: Surviving—Learning to stay alive by meeting your basic physiological needs—warmth, hunger, etc. Motivation 2: Conforming—Learning to keeping safe and secure by staying loyal to your family, kin and culture. Motivation 5: Differentiating—Learning how to distinguish yourself from the crowd by honing your natural skills and talents. Motivation 4: Individuating—Letting go of the aspects of your parental and cultural conditioning (beliefs) that no longer align with who you are. Motivation 5: Self-actualizing—Learning to become more fully who you are by leading a values- and purpose-driven life with integrity. Motivation 6: Integrating—Learning how to align with others who share the same values and purpose to create a better world. Motivation 7: Serving—Fulfilling your destiny by caring for and serving the needs of humanity and/or the planet. Primary Motivations Below 30 50-59 40-49 60 + 30-39 Age Exercises: Identifying your Primary Motivation
  • 31. What prevents us from evolving? 1. The fears we have concerning our Secondary Motivations—unmet deficiency needs (stages of psychological development that have been passed through but not mastered). 2. The cultural world views in which we are embedded.
  • 32. Secondary motivations “Unmet needs from the stages of psychological development we have passed through but not yet mastered—primarily our deficiency needs A deficiency need is something that is important to get, have or experience in order to feel physically and emotionally safe in your framework of existence. You feel anxious and fearful when you are unable to satisfy your deficiency needs, but once they are met, you no longer pay them much attention.
  • 33. The choice between safety and growth Opportunity Threat GROWTH SAFETY Situation FEAR COURAGE
  • 34. Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) The choice between safety and growth “Why is it so hard and painful for some to grow…? Here we must become fully aware of the fixative and regressive power of ungratified deficiency-needs, of the attraction of safety and security, of the functions of defence and protection against pain, fear, loss and threat, of the need for courage in order to grow... Every human being has both sets of forces within him. One set clings to safety and defensiveness out of fear, tending to regress backward, hanging on to the past, afraid to grow … afraid to take chances, afraid to jeopardize what he already has, afraid of independence, freedom, separateness (ego). The other set of forces impels him forward toward wholeness of Self and uniqueness of Self, toward full functioning of all his capacities, toward confidence in the face of the external world at the same time that he can accept his deepest, real, unconscious Self (soul).”
  • 35. Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) The choice between safety and growth “Therefore, we can consider the process of healthy growth to be a never ending series of free choice situations, confronting each individual at every point throughout his (or her) life, in which he (or she) must choose between safety (fear) and growth (courage), dependence and independence, regression or progression, and immaturity and maturity.” What prevents people from evolving? Secondary motivations
  • 36. Early Maladaptive Schema Conscious or subconscious fear-based beliefs “Early Maladaptive Schemas [beliefs] seem to be the result of dysfunctional experiences with parents, siblings, and peers during the first few years of an individual’s life. For example a child who is constantly criticized when performance does not meet parental standards is prone to develop the incompetence/failure schema.” Jeffrey E. Young, Cognitive Therapy for Personality Disorders: A schema-focused approach (revised edition) (Sarasota: Professional Resource Press), 1994, p. 11.
  • 37. Exercises: Identifying your Secondary Motivations Note down the motivations where you have the most words. My out-of-flow days exercise Pick out five of the following words which reflect the needs you have that are not being met when you having an out-of-flow day, particularly with regard to your working life. Motivation 1: Survival, safety, control, wealth, financial stability, job security. Motivation 2: Belonging, friendship, respect, loyalty, caring, harmony. Motivation 3: Excellence, status, pride, achievement, recognition, continuous improvement. Motivation 4: Autonomy, challenges, adaptability, accountability, continuous learning. Motivation 5: Meaning, purpose, integrity, fairness, commitment, creativity, trust. Motivation 6: Making a difference, coaching, mentoring, collaboration, sustainability. Motivation 7: Compassion, humility, future generations, ecology, social justice, service.
  • 38. Exercises: Identifying your Secondary Motivations Note down the motivations where you have the most words. My stressors exercise Pick five of the following words which reflect your unmet needs when you are feeling stressed, particularly with regard to your working life. What are you needing? Motivation 1: Survival, safety, control, wealth, financial stability, job security. Motivation 2: Belonging, friendship, respect, loyalty, caring, harmony. Motivation 3: Excellence, status, pride, achievement, recognition, continuous improvement. Motivation 4: Autonomy, challenges, adaptability, accountability, continuous learning. Motivation 5: Meaning, purpose, integrity, fairness, commitment, creativity, trust. Motivation 6: Making a difference, coaching, mentoring, collaboration, sustainability. Motivation 7: Compassion, humility, future generations, ecology, social justice, service.
  • 39. Secondary Motivations I don’t have enough I am not loved enough I am not enough
  • 40. Feedback Surveys (see www.valuescentre.com) o Leadership Values Assessment o Leadership Development Report
  • 41. Identifying Secondary Motivations (feedback LVA) 15 Assessors’ Perspective Top ten values Distribution of values Personal Entropy = 36% Activated Soul Mind 0% (30%) Ego-Soul Alignment 27% (40%) Ego Mind 73% (30%) achievement 12 authoritarian (L) 10 being the best 8 competitive (L) 8 demanding (L) 8 determination 7 excellence 7 knowledge 7 power (L) 6 results orientation 6 risk-taking 6 0% 20% 40% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0% 0% 0% 27% 37% 9% 18% 9% ambitious courage creativity excellence integrity long-term perspective passion results orientation strategic alliances vision Individual’s Perspective Top ten values What is immediately obvious from this example is the mismatch between how the person sees himself and how others see him. This person does not have a realistic view of how he is coming across to others. His ego projects a false persona. He views himself operating at higher levels of consciousness than his behaviours would suggest to his assessors. Primary Motivation - Individuation Secondary Motivations - Self-esteem - Relationships - Survival
  • 42. Identifying Secondary Motivations (feedback LVA) There is a strong correlation between how people see this person and how she sees herself: there are four matching values in the top ten—listening, open to new ideas, team builder and vision. She has a low level of personal entropy. This is an authentic individual. caring 14 coaching/mentoring 8 enthusiasm 8 collaborative 7 making a difference 7 authenticity 6 integrity 6 listening 6 open to new ideas 6 team builder 6 vision 6 19 Assessors’ Perspective Top ten values Distribution of values 1% 1% 2% 2% 19% 5% 20% 23% 18% 9% 0% 20% 40% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Personal Entropy = 4% Activated Soul Mind 27% (30%) Ego-Soul Alignment 43% (50%) Ego Mind 30% (20%) building trust courage empathy high standards learning listening open to new ideas team builder vision wisdom Individual’s Perspective Top ten values Primary Motivation - Self-actualization - Integrating Secondary Motivations - None
  • 43. Identifying Cultural Blockages to Growth Self-reporting survey • Individual Values Assessment (IVA) Feedback survey (involving whole group) • Cultural Values Assessment (CVA)
  • 44. How to identify cultural blockages to personal growth If the cultures your clients are embedded in are less advanced in their development than your clients are, your clients may find it difficult to explore their full potential—high entropy cultures. They will seek to work elsewhere. If, on the other hand, the cultures they are embedded in are more advanced in their development than they are (low entropy cultures), your clients will feel supported in exploring their development, at least up to the levels of psychological development that these cultures have attained or are willing to tolerate.
  • 45. Identifying cultural blockages to growth (IVA) Personal Values Current Culture Desired Culture 1. adaptability 2. commitment 3. control (L) 4. ease with uncertainty 5. humour/fun 6. Integrity 7. perseverance 8. risk-taking 9. self-discipline 10. well-being 1. bureaucracy (L) 2. confusion (L) 3. control (L) 4. cost reduction (L) 5. empire building (L) 6. hierarchy (L) 7. job insecurity (L) 8. long hours (L) 9. results orientation 10. silo mentality (L) 1. achievement 2. commitment 3. customer collaboration 4. customer satisfaction 5. ease with uncertainty 6. honesty 7. inclusiveness 8. partnerships 9. professionalism 10. trust Individual Primary Motivation - Shifting from Individuating to Self-actualizing Organization Motivations - Differentiating This is not a good fit. The individual is being held back by the “toxic” culture of his organization. It will be difficult for this person to grow and develop in this organization.
  • 46. Identifying cultural blockages to growth (CVA) Here we see the views of 80 managers of the current and desired culture of their organisation. The organisation is stuck in the first three levels of consciousness. The managers want the organisation to move to the transformation level of consciousness. Current Culture 1. cost reduction (L) 64 2. profit 40 3. results orientation 36 4. blame (L) 34 5. demanding (L) 32 6. long hours (L) 29 7. accountability 27 8. job/insecurity (L) 26 9. lack of appreciation (L) 25 10. control (L) 25 18% 16% 14% 8% 4% 13% 15% 7% 4% 1% 0% 10% 20% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Cultural Entropy = 48% 5% 22% 73% Desired Culture 1. continuous improvement 40 2. customer satisfaction 36 3. accountability 29 4. coaching/mentoring 28 5. leadership development 26 6. teamwork 23 7. open communication 22 8. adaptability 21 9. employee recognition 21 10. information sharing 21 3% 5% 13% 12% 31% 20% 13% 3% 0% 20% 40% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 16% 51% 33%
  • 47. Identifying cultural blockages to growth (CVA) The 80 managers see themselves primarily at the self-actualization level of development. They want the organisation to move to the transformation level of consciousness to overcome the high cultural entropy, and then move to the internal cohesion level. 13% 53% 34% Desired Culture 1. continuous improvement 40 2. customer satisfaction 36 3. accountability 29 4. coaching/mentoring 28 5. leadership development 26 6. teamwork 23 7. open communication 22 8. adaptability 21 9. employee recognition 21 10. information sharing 21 3% 5% 13% 12% 31% 20% 13% 3% 0% 20% 40% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 16% 51% 33% Personal Values 1. commitment 39 2. honesty 33 3. making a difference 31 4. positive attitude 29 5. achievement 27 6. humour/fun 27 7. integrity 27 8. fairness 26 9. performance 26 10. initiative 23 1% 1% 4% 10% 18% 19% 34% 9% 4% 0% 20% 40% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 What prevents people from evolving? Culture
  • 48. For more information Go to: www.valuescentre.com See Blog: http://evolutionarycoachingblog.wordpress.com Get the Book: Evolutionary Coaching by Richard Barrett Contact Me: richard@valuescentre.com

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