The Agile Manifesto<br />Some thought starters for Ogilvy on how to work with Agile and SCRUM approaches to managing proje...
Individuals and interactions over Processes and tools<br />The Creed<br /># 1<br />
Working software over Comprehensive documentation<br />The Creed<br /># 2<br />
Customer collaboration over Contract negotiation<br />The Creed<br /># 3<br />
Responding to change over Following a plan<br />The Creed<br /># 4<br />
Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. <br />Principl...
Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive adv...
Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timesc...
Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. <br />Principle: # 4<br />
Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the jo...
The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversa...
Working software is the primary measure of progress. <br />Principle: # 7<br />
Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant...
Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. <br />Principle: # 9<br />
Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. <br />Principle: # 10<br />
The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.<br />Principle: # 11<br />
At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. ...
Scrum Basics<br />Pete Deemer<br />CPO, Yahoo! India R&D<br />
The Basics of Scrum<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />7<br />8<br /...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
 Product Owner<br />Responsible for the overall project vision and goals<br />Responsible for managing project ROI vs. ris...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
Team<br />7 people, + or – 2<br />Has worked with as high as 15, as few as 3<br />Can be shared with other teams (but bett...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
The Role of the ScrumMaster<br />The ScrumMaster does everything in their power to help the team achieve success<br />This...
What the ScrumMaster Does<br />Serves the team<br />The ScrumMaster takes action to help remove impediments to the team’s ...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
Product Backlog<br />Product Owner lists items in descending order of priority (highest priority item is listed first, nex...
Product Backlog<br />List of everything that could ever be of value to the business for the team to produce<br />Ranked in...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
Sprint Planning Meeting<br />Takes place before the start of every Sprint<br />Team decides how much Product Backlog it wi...
Not textbook Scrum, but many teams find it useful<br />Takes place several days before the end of a Sprint (and start of t...
Daily Scrum Meeting<br />Every weekday<br />Whole team attends<br />Everyone stands<br />Lasts 15 minutes or less<br />Eve...
Table Exercise: Daily Scrum Meeting<br />Do a Daily Scrum Meeting for your table<br />One person plays the role of ScrumMa...
Updating the Sprint Backlog<br />Before or after the Daily Scrum, team members update the hours remaining on the Sprint Ba...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
Sprint Review<br />Purpose of the Sprint Review is<br />Demo what the team has built<br />Generate feedback, which the Pro...
The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Te...
Sprint Retrospective<br />What is it?<br />1-2 hour meeting following each Sprint Demo<br />Attended by Product Owner, Tea...
Thank You<br />
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Agile manifesto

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  • This deck is a compilation of the Agile manifesto, it’s 12 principles, and a few basic elements of the SCRUM process.The SCRUM process is a specific adaption of Agile. It outlines 3 roles of people involved in a project and different way to manage meetings and each SPRINT.A few link below to more resourceshttp://agilemanifesto.org/http://www.icescrum.org/en/http://www.scrumalliance.org/http://www.implementingscrum.com/section/blog/cartoons/
  • Agile manifesto

    1. 1. The Agile Manifesto<br />Some thought starters for Ogilvy on how to work with Agile and SCRUM approaches to managing projects<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. Individuals and interactions over Processes and tools<br />The Creed<br /># 1<br />
    4. 4. Working software over Comprehensive documentation<br />The Creed<br /># 2<br />
    5. 5. Customer collaboration over Contract negotiation<br />The Creed<br /># 3<br />
    6. 6. Responding to change over Following a plan<br />The Creed<br /># 4<br />
    7. 7. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. <br />Principle: # 1<br />
    8. 8. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. <br />Principle: # 2<br />
    9. 9. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. <br />Principle: # 3<br />
    10. 10. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. <br />Principle: # 4<br />
    11. 11. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. <br />Principle: # 5<br />
    12. 12. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. <br />Principle: # 6<br />
    13. 13. Working software is the primary measure of progress. <br />Principle: # 7<br />
    14. 14. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. <br />Principle: # 8<br />
    15. 15. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. <br />Principle: # 9<br />
    16. 16. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. <br />Principle: # 10<br />
    17. 17. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.<br />Principle: # 11<br />
    18. 18. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly. <br />Principle: # 12<br />
    19. 19. Scrum Basics<br />Pete Deemer<br />CPO, Yahoo! India R&D<br />
    20. 20. The Basics of Scrum<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />4-WeekSprint<br />13<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />
    21. 21. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />
    22. 22. Product Owner<br />Responsible for the overall project vision and goals<br />Responsible for managing project ROI vs. risk<br />Responsible for taking all inputs into what the team should produce, and turning it into a prioritized list (the Product Backlog)<br />Participates actively in Sprint Planning and Sprint Review meetings, and is available to team throughout the Sprint<br />Determines release plan and communicates it to upper management and the customer<br />
    23. 23. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />
    24. 24. Team<br />7 people, + or – 2<br />Has worked with as high as 15, as few as 3<br />Can be shared with other teams (but better when not)<br />Can change between Sprints (but better when they don’t)<br />Can be distributed (but better when co-located)<br />Cross-functional<br />Possesses all the skills necessary to produce an increment of potentially shippable product<br />Team takes on tasks based on skills, not just official “role”<br />Self-managing<br />Team manages itself to achieve the Sprint commitment<br />
    25. 25. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />
    26. 26. The Role of the ScrumMaster<br />The ScrumMaster does everything in their power to help the team achieve success<br />This includes:<br />Serving the team<br />Protecting the team<br />Guiding the team’s use of Scrum<br />
    27. 27. What the ScrumMaster Does<br />Serves the team<br />The ScrumMaster takes action to help remove impediments to the team’s effectiveness<br />The ScrumMaster facilitates the team’s group interactions, to help the team achieve its full potential<br />Protects the team<br />The ScrumMaster protects the team from anything that threatens its effectiveness, such as outside interference or disruption<br />The ScrumMaster will need to confront uncomfortable issues, both inside and outside the team<br />Guiding the team’s use of Scrum<br />The ScrumMaster teaches Scrum to the team and organization<br />The ScrumMaster ensures that all standard Scrum rules and practices are followed<br />The ScrumMaster organizes all Scrum-related practices<br />
    28. 28. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />Product Backlog<br />
    29. 29. Product Backlog<br />Product Owner lists items in descending order of priority (highest priority item is listed first, next-highest is second, etc.)<br />Size estimates are rough estimates (can either be arbitrary “points”, or “ideal days”)<br />
    30. 30. Product Backlog<br />List of everything that could ever be of value to the business for the team to produce<br />Ranked in order of priority<br />Priority is a function of business value versus risk<br />Product Owner can make any changes they want before the start of a Sprint Planning Meeting<br />Items added, changed, removed, reordered<br />How much documentation is up to the team and Product Owner to decide<br />The farther down the list, the bigger and less defined the items become<br />~2 Sprints worth are defined in detail<br />
    31. 31. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />Product Backlog<br />
    32. 32. Sprint Planning Meeting<br />Takes place before the start of every Sprint<br />Team decides how much Product Backlog it will commit to complete by the end of the Sprint, and comes up with a plan and list of tasks for how to achieve it<br />What’s a good commitment?<br />Clearly understood by all<br />Shared among the team<br />Achievable without sacrificing quality <br />Achievable without sacrificing sustainable pace<br />Attended by Team, Product Owner, ScrumMaster, Stakeholders<br />May require 1-2 hours for each week of Sprint duration<br />2 week Sprint = 2-4 hours, 4 week Sprint = 4-8 hours<br />
    33. 33. Not textbook Scrum, but many teams find it useful<br />Takes place several days before the end of a Sprint (and start of the next Sprint)<br />Product Owner spends an hour walking the team through the items at the top of the Product Backlog for the next Sprint<br />Team asks questions, requests clarification, recommend items to be broken down further<br />Review & Retrospective<br />for Sprint 3<br />(afternoon)<br />Sprint Planning<br />Meeting forSprint 4<br />(morning)<br />Sprint 4 Begins<br />Pre-Meetingfor Sprint 4<br />Mon<br />Tues<br />Weds<br />Thurs<br />Fri<br />Sprint Pre-Planning Meeting<br />
    34. 34. Daily Scrum Meeting<br />Every weekday<br />Whole team attends<br />Everyone stands<br />Lasts 15 minutes or less<br />Everyone reports 3 things only to each other<br />What was I able to accomplish since last meeting<br />What will I try to accomplish by next meeting<br />What is blocking me<br />No discussion, conversation until meeting ends<br />Product Owner can attend and report<br />Update of artifacts after standup<br />
    35. 35. Table Exercise: Daily Scrum Meeting<br />Do a Daily Scrum Meeting for your table<br />One person plays the role of ScrumMaster<br />The rest of the table are team-members<br />Each team-member reports to the group:<br />What I was able to get done since last Daily Standup Meeting<br />What I will try to get done by the next Daily Standup Meeting<br />What is blocking me? (If nothing, say “No Blocks”)<br />But there is a twist…<br />
    36. 36. Updating the Sprint Backlog<br />Before or after the Daily Scrum, team members update the hours remaining on the Sprint Backlog <br />
    37. 37. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />
    38. 38. Sprint Review<br />Purpose of the Sprint Review is<br />Demo what the team has built<br />Generate feedback, which the Product Owner can incorporate in the Product Backlog<br />Attended by Team, Product Owner, ScrumMaster, functional managers, and any other stakeholders<br />A demo of what’s been built, not a presentation about what’s been built<br />no Powerpoints allowed!<br />Usually lasts 1-2 hours<br />Followed by Sprint Retrospective<br />
    39. 39. The Basics of Scrum<br /> ScrumMaster<br />Daily ScrumMeeting<br />4-WeekSprint<br />Review<br />Product Owner<br />The Team<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Potentially Shippable Product<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br />11<br />12<br />13<br />Retrospective<br /> Commitment<br />No Changes<br />(in Duration or Deliverable)<br />
    40. 40. Sprint Retrospective<br />What is it?<br />1-2 hour meeting following each Sprint Demo<br />Attended by Product Owner, Team, ScrumMaster<br />Usually a neutral person will be invited in to facilitate<br />What’s working and what could work better<br />Why does the Retrospective matter?<br />Accelerates visibility<br />Accelerates action to improve<br />
    41. 41. Thank You<br />
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