5 Power Essentials Every Working Woman Needs To Know

456 views

Published on

Special Report by Barbara Pachter

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
456
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

5 Power Essentials Every Working Woman Needs To Know

  1. 1.                     5 “Power” EssentialsEvery Working Woman Needs To Know Special Report by Barbara Pachter                       Pachter & Associates  PO Box 3680  Cherry Hill, NJ 08034  856.751.6141  www.pachter.com  bpachter@pachter.com    www.facebook.com/pachtertraining  www.barbarapachtersblog.com      ©2011. All rights reserved. Pachter & Associates. 
  2. 2.                                                                                           5 “Power” Essentials Every Working Woman Needs to Know  By Barbara Pachter   As the young woman was leaving the office, her boss started giving her assignments. She replied, “But, I’m in training this afternoon.” He ignored her comments and continued to describe the tasks in more detail. She told him again that she was in training. He continued to give her instructions.    It dawned on her that he hadn’t heard her. She raised her volume significantly and repeated, “I’m in training this afternoon.” He replied, “Oh, sure, you can do this tomorrow. Have a good class!”  Speaking softly is one of the power robbers that can affect a woman’s credibility and success. There are others.   According to current research on women by Nicole Stephens, an assistant professor at the Kellogg School of Management (Northwestern University), “Although we’ve made great strides toward gender equality in American society, significant obstacles still do, in fact, hold many women back from reaching the upper levels of their organizations.”   Women have achieved much in the way of legitimacy and power in the business world. If you need proof, just think of Indra Nooyl, Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo, or Hewlett‐Packard President and CEO Meg Whitman. However, in realizing our fair and equal worth in terms of our earning potential and promotability, there is still more to do.   We must stop giving our power away.  We need to be aware of how we present ourselves in the workplace and craft a strategic plan for developing our careers.    You’re probably thinking, “This doesn’t apply to me; I would never give my power away.” The truth is that, like the woman in the above illustration, you probably don’t know that you’re doing it. Many of our discounting behaviors/actions are unconscious.  In our culture, many women have been socialized – and some are still being socialized – from an early age to behave and speak passively and seductively, and this socialization follows them right into adulthood and the workplace. It sticks.  Over the past 25 years, as I have conducted thousands of seminars and coached numerous female executives, I have noted five very important “power” areas that can impact women’s careers. In this Special Report, you are encouraged to become familiar with these areas and to practice the suggestions.     ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 2 Tweet this article
  3. 3. #1 BECOME KNOWN AS AN EXPERT Experts command respect. Experts get promoted. These two facts tell you why you not only need  to become an expert, you need others to see you as one.  So what exactly is an expert? An expert is someone who stays current with changes occurring in  her field. That means there’s never time to rest on yesterday’s achievements. Even if you’re  an expert today, you have to keep learning and growing, or you won’t be an expert for long.  Here are three steps you can take to become recognized as an expert:   Let people know of your accomplishments. One of the most effective career strategies for  women is for them to make their achievements known, according to Christine Silva, senior  director of research for Catalyst, a nonprofit research organization. If you don’t toot your own  horn, who will know about your successes? Apply for professional and community awards.  Winning one provides recognition that money can’t buy. Offer to make presentations, give  keynote speeches, and submit articles to your professional publications. Don’t minimize your  achievements; do accept compliments graciously, and speak well of yourself.    Participate.  Join your professional organizations. Get involved in their activities and volunteer  for committees. Run for office, including the top positions.    Analyze your educational credentials. Do you need any additional training? Do you need the  expertise provided by a degree or an advanced degree?  Also, are you staying up‐to‐date with  technology and social media, and its impact on your profession?   Suggestion: If you are uncomfortable giving a presentation, take a class on presentation skills or hire a coach. Click here to learn about Pachter & Associates’ presentation skills training.    #2 PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR NONVERBAL MESSAGES  There are many aspects of nonverbal communication that contribute to our professional image. I have isolated the areas where women can give their power away inadvertently. While the bad news is that you may have been participating in some or all of these behaviors, the good news is that habits, with awareness and practice, can be broken. But do not assume that you don’t do these things until you get objective feedback. These habits can become such a part of us that we fail to notice them even when we’re looking.  Stance  Many women stand with their legs crossed, hands folded in front, or with their weight pressed down on one hip. Either way, your position is not grounded and comes across as very submissive. You are taking up as little space as possible. To stand assertively, don’t cross your legs. Keep your legs aligned with your shoulders, feet about 4 to 6 inches apart. Your weight should be distributed   ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 3 Tweet this article
  4. 4. equally on both legs. Don’t tilt your head. Your chin should be up, but not way up, and unless you’re gesturing, your hands can rest at your sides. This is an assertive, open posture.  Suggestion: Increase your awareness of stance. Do body checks during the day and observe other women. Have someone record you on video, and observe your posture. You can’t eliminate what you don’t know you are doing. This video can also help with a number of the following nonverbal items.   Gestures  Many women have a habit of pointing their fingers. And don’t tell me you don’t do this! Women come up to me and tell me they don’t point while they are pointing their fingers in my face. This can be interpreted as aggressive. Women – men do these things, too – are also pen‐clickers, hand‐wringers, and rubber‐band stretchers. These gestures all reveal nervousness. Remember, it is okay to be nervous, but do not show it.  Suggestion: If you don’t hold items in your hands, you cannot play with them. Also, if you want to point, do so with an open palm and with your fingers together.   Eye Contact  It is important to look at someone when you are speaking to them. Many of us have a tendency to look away in an uncomfortable situation. By doing this, you are telling the other person that you are nervous. You don’t want to do that. Force yourself to look at the person, though you do occasionally look away.   You also want to be on the same eye level, as best you can. Men, because they are often taller, frequently have the advantage of looking down at women when speaking. Level the playing field by asking a man to sit down so you can be at the same eye level when you speak.                                                                       Facial Expressions  Another habit you may have picked up without realizing is smiling too much, especially when you are delivering bad news. It destroys your credibility. You want your facial expression to be consistent with your message.                                                                                                                       Voice                                                                                                                                                     If I could say only one thing to women it would be this: SPEAK UP! Women often speak too softly, and when they are nervous, they lose even more volume. Many women, at all levels, need to increase their volume, whether they are in a meeting offering a suggestion, or negotiating with a difficult vendor. You can usually add power to your presence by adding volume.                                                            Suggestion: Become familiar with your voice image by listening to yourself. Most voice‐mail systems allow you to listen to yourself before you send a message. Take advantage of this option. ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 4 Tweet this article
  5. 5. If you don’t like what you hear, redo the message. You can also practice speaking using Dragon Dictation. It’s a free app on the iPad.       The Nervous Giggle  Some women have the habit of giggling at the end of their sentences. Perhaps they are nervous, uncomfortable, or think the other person might not like what they are saying. Regardless of the reason, do not giggle. Research indicates that women in the workplace who giggle, lose power and come across as little girls.   #3 ASSERT YOURSELF  Confronting others is difficult for many people, especially women. Often, they will not confront co‐workers, bosses, friends and family members about “bothersome behavior” and its impact on them. Women tend to ignore or tolerate negative situations—and by doing so, often feel bad about themselves.  I believe that the most prevalent reason for this silence is that women simply don’t know what to say, and some believe that they don’t have a right to express themselves honestly to others.   We know how to be passive. That’s easy – simply be quiet.   We know how to be aggressive. That’s easy, too – scream and yell.   Neither of these behaviors usually accomplishes much, though there are times when they may be appropriate. Generally, though, you want to be assertive. You want to exhibit what I call “polite and powerful” behavior.  Here are four pointers to help you increase your assertiveness:   Speak up.  If someone is doing something that is bothering you, you have the right to state  your objection. You can choose to confront in an assertive manner. You do not have the right,  however, to label others unfairly, curse at, or verbally attack them.   Prepare for assertiveness. Start by recognizing the difference between “I” and “You”  statements. I’m not understanding versus You’re not explaining it right. The use of “I” can be  more effective because it doesn’t blame the other person. Write down what you want to say  to help clarify the issue. Say what you want to say, and then be quiet. Women have a tendency  to keep talking out of nervousness, and can talk themselves out of assertiveness. Eliminate  self‐discounting language, such as it’s only my opinion, hopefully, and I was just wondering if,  perhaps…     Use direct statements instead of questions. Listen to the difference between Can you meet  me after lunch? and Let’s meet after lunch. When you use a question, which is a softer way of  expressing yourself, you are giving the other person a choice. And the person may or  ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 5 Tweet this article
  6. 6. may not choose what you want.  When you use a direct statement, you are letting people  know what you want, and, as a result, you are more apt to get it. (Context is important. When  talking up the ladder, you sometimes may choose to use a question.)    Act assertively until you are assertive. If you act assertively, people will respond to you as if  you are assertive. Over time you build your self‐confidence. Keep learning about projecting an  assertive image. Take classes and read books on the subject.  Additional information on conflict can be found in my book, The Power of Positive Confrontation.    #4 DRESS TO ENHANCE YOUR PROFESSIONAL IMAGE  How you dress matters. And it does because it is a very important form of nonverbal communication. We make assumptions about people very quickly. Clothing can enhance your professionalism, or take away from it.   To build a business wardrobe, start out by buying good‐quality clothes. Quality makes a difference. In the long run, buying an expensive, quality outfit that will last longer, fit better and wear well is more cost‐effective for you.   Before you take your clothing selections to the cash register, you should ask yourself two very important questions:   Will this item of clothing be appropriate? Does it comply with my company’s dress code, and  is it appropriate for the event or activity that I am attending, and the region of the country or  the world where I am working? If unsure, you may need to ask someone who is likely to know.  When I went to Abu Dhabi to conduct training, I asked my contact in the Middle East what  would be suitable clothing.   What message am I sending? Are you promoting your professionalism or your sexuality  through your clothing choices? Sexy is not a corporate look. Do you want to be remembered  for what you said or for what you wore?     Even if your office environment is “business casual,” never wear anything that is too low, too  short, too tight, or too much of anything. When you wear a low‐cut blouse, for example, you  invite others to notice your cleavage instead of your words or actions. You don’t want your  clothing to be a distraction and undermine your credibility. You can look like a female without  flaunting your figure.     Suggestion: You can sometimes look at what higher‐level women in your company are wearing  and copy their choices. Be cautious about modeling your clothing after women on television.   They often dress provocatively. (Policewomen chasing after bad guys in 4‐inch heels are not  good role models!)       ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 6 Tweet this article
  7. 7.  #5 FIND ROLE MODELS, HAVE MENTORS, AND DEVELOP A NETWORK  Women who move up in organizations often have factors in common. They have role models, mentors, and networks. These women know it’s important to have people they can count on and learn from.   Role Models  A role model can be someone you know or someone you don’t know, but either way, this person doesn’t take an active role in your career development. A role model is a person who inspires you because he or she proves that things are possible, dreams are achievable.  Dr. Mae Jemison, the first black woman to travel in space, credits the fictional Lieutenant Uhura on the television show Star Trek as her inspiration for becoming an astronaut.  A role model is someone you learn from simply by watching his or her behavior, listening to what he or she has to say, or reading about the person’s life and accomplishments. Don’t be envious of the accomplishments of others. Instead, let them inspire you to do great things. Both men and women can be your role models.  Suggestion: Observe how other professionals act. If someone does something you admire, adapt that into your behavior. But, periodically, check in and ask yourself, is this behavior working for me?  Mentors  A mentor, unlike a role model, is someone who takes an active role in your career development. Mentors often provide specific career advice for you. A mentor can make a tremendous difference in your career success. Some organizations have formal mentoring programs for employees. If such a program is available to you, I suggest you sign up. Again, both men and women can be your mentors.  Professional Networks  A professional network is a group of professionals who help and support each other. A professional network can be your best friend if you’re job hunting or trying to navigate through corporate politics. It’s also a great way to interact with experts in your field, though a network doesn’t necessarily have to be people who are all in the same profession.  Suggestion: Join your professional associations and get involved. They are excellent places to meet people with more career experience and knowledge in your field. There are numerous networks on social media sites, such as LinkedIn, that can also help you build your career.      ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 7 Tweet this article
  8. 8.  CONCLUSION:  Your life can be divided into three segments: Career, Family and Self. You need to remember that your career, though it might be extremely important to you, is only one part of who you are. If you feel as though you never have enough time for each area, you probably don’t.    Healthy people live balanced lives. They make time for loved ones, they exercise, and they eat well.  They also tell themselves positive things. If you want to get ahead and stay ahead in your career, I recommend that you look very carefully and often at each of these areas of your life and determine whether they are out of balance.  If so, you need to set goals for each area so you can get into balance. And you need to be assertive in following through. Schedule time for yourself on your calendar, and stick to it.   AFTERWORD:   This Special Report is an updated version of my first Special Report on Women, which I wrote in 1996.   There has been a lot of research lately about women in the business world and the impact of the media on women’s self‐image. As I read articles about this research and watched the documentary Miss Representation that aired on the OWN network, I realized that many of the factors that I originally wrote about 15 years ago are still occurring and limiting women’s careers.    As noted earlier, women have made significant gains in the business world, but more needs to be done.  The world today is very different from the way it was in 1996. We have the means to share this information like never before. Using social media encourages conversation. Talk about these five points with others. Tweet this article, share it on Facebook and mention it in your blog. Email a copy to your colleagues. Please do your part to raise awareness and keep the conversation going.   ABOUT THE AUTHOR:                         Barbara Pachter, president of Pachter & Associates, has spent much of her  career inspiring others to achieve professionally, whether through her nine  published books – including the highly‐acclaimed The Power of Positive  Confrontation – or through her thousands of seminars for such clients as  Microsoft, Chrysler, Con Edison, Wawa, Pfizer and Campbell Soup. As an  adjunct faculty member at Rutgers University, she was recognized with a  Teaching Excellence Award. Pachter has appeared on national television,  including Today and the news magazine 20/20, and has been featured in major publications such as TIME Magazine, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, providing suggestions on professional development and business etiquette. In 2010, NJBiz named her one of the Best 50 Women in Business in New Jersey.   ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 8 Tweet this article
  9. 9.  Pachter & Associates offers seminars and coaching in the following areas:    Assertive Communication  Business Etiquette  Presentation Skills  Business Writing  Conflict  Women in the Business World  Professional Presence  To schedule training, or for more information, please contact Joyce Hoff at 856.751.6141 or joyce@pachter.com.   Barbara Pachter can be contacted at bpachter@pachter.com.    REPRINT POLICY Requests to reproduce this Special Report, 5 “Power” Essentials Every Working Woman Needs To  Know, for commercial or other public use, must be made in writing to contact@pachter.com.   PACHTER & ASSOCIATES PO Box 3680 Cherry Hill, NJ 08034 USA 856.751.6141 www.pachter.com www.barbarapachtersblog.com                                                             "Like Us" on Facebook: www.facebook.com/pachtertraining      ©2011. Pachter & Associates, PO Box 3680, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, 856.751.6141, www.pachter.com 9 Tweet this article

×