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Yost 2009 Portfolio - Professional, Teaching, & Creative

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This is my Teaching, Professional, and Creative Portfolio. I am available for teaching positions starting August 2009. Thanks for your time and interest. Bambi

This is my Teaching, Professional, and Creative Portfolio. I am available for teaching positions starting August 2009. Thanks for your time and interest. Bambi

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  • 1. Bambi Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. Professional, Teaching, & Creative Portfolio Bambi L Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. 3761 Perry Street Denver, CO 80212 www.BambiLYost.com Bambi_L_Yost@yahoo.com 720.217.2871 c
  • 2. Biography Bambi Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. (website in progress: www.BambiLYost.com) University of Colorado at Denver and Boulder Research Center Affiliations: Children,Youth and Environments Center for Research and Design with Dr. Louise Chawla (http://thunder1.cudenver.edu/cye/index.htm) Learning Landscapes with Professor Lois A. Brink (http://www.learninglandscapes.org) Land Use Futures Lab with Dr. Brian Muller (http://home.comcast.net/~rpglam/storage/projects.html) Hello. I am a 5th year Design and Planning doctoral student at the University of Colorado at Denver where I also completed my masters degrees in Landscape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning. I currently work full-time as a Graduate Part-Time Instructor, Teach- ing Assistant, and Research Assistant for the Environmental Design Undergraduate Program in Boulder and for the Architecture & Planning Graduate Program in Denver. My dissertation topic, “Exploring Childhood Attachments to Natural and Outdoor Play Environments” fo- cuses on ethnographic and innovative mixed-methods, schoolyard environments and behaviors, place attachment, benefits of access to the natural world, and children & youth. I will be completing my comprehensive exams and presenting my dissertation proposal spring 2009. Since 2001, I have worked as the Project Manager for Professor Lois A. Brink’s Learning Landscape program. In addition to overseeing con- struction and budgets, I have planned, designed, organized, and led community-based design-builds. To date, 48 Denver Public School Learning Landscape playgrounds have been rebuilt and sustained with Denver community, partnering organizations, Denver Public Schools faculty and students, University of Colorado at Denver graduate students, and AmeriCorps Volunteers. Over the years I have helped Learning Land- scapes raise 58 million dollars through public and private donations, grants, and school bonds to support the Learning Landscapes. In spring of 2008 I began working with the Boulder Valley School District to implement Learning Landscapes at 25 sites. Starting spring 2009, I will be teaching graduate and undergraduate Learning Landscapes courses for the University of Colorado and the Boulder Valley School District. In addition, I currently serve as a research assistant to Dr. Louise Chawla and the Children,Youth and Environments (CYE) Center and to Dr. Brian Muller and the Land Use Futures Lab. (LUFL) My research for CYE focuses on beneficial environments for children and youth. My research for the LUFL focuses on qualitative methods and analysis and public comments as they relate to place attachment to BLM lands and national forests. Prior to pursuing my masters degrees, I was a Program Manager and Environmental Educator for five years for the Chesapeake Bay Founda- tion in Virginia where I designed and led watershed and wetlands programs. I have an extensive background in participatory planning, youth empowerment, community development, outdoor education, volunteer coordination, physical design and construction, grant research and writing, and project management.
  • 3. Bambi Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. Professional Portfolio Bambi L Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. 3761 Perry Street Denver, CO 80212 www.BambiLYost.com Bambi_L_Yost@yahoo.com 720.217.2871 c
  • 4. The Learning Landscapes Initiative Roles: Project Manager, Teacher, Researcher, & Author Years: 2001-Present Total Budget: 58 million Average Budget per Playground: $450,000 Grant Funding (Author & Collaborator): $576,141 To date, I have helped rebuild and sustain 48 Denver Public School Learning Landscape playgrounds with Denver community, partnering organizations, Denver Public Schools faculty and students, University of Colorado at Denver graduate students, and AmeriCorps Volunteers. What follows is a small sample of the many community projects I led and managed. A Young Girl Helps Paint Picnic Tables at Gilpin Elementary School What are Learning Landscapes? Students Painting Outdoor Mural Maintaining Whittier Elementary School • Schoolyard landscapes that support physical activity, outdoor learning, and improved social interaction. • Multi-generational spaces for outdoor play opportunities for both students and the community. • Aesthetically pleasing focal points for the community. • Public green spaces in a highly urban setting which promote livability for children and families. • Participatory community-based playgrounds which Bromwell Elementary School Sculpture encourage civic engagement. Smith Elementary School Volunteers
  • 5. BEFORE - Columbian Water Harvest Garden Area, 2000 AFTER - Students Weeding and Pruning Water Harvest Garden Area, 2006 Learning Landscape Accomplishments* • 48 built Learning Landscapes in Denver • $58 million raised to date • 8,500+ community volunteers • 18,000+ students served • 250,000+ city residents served • 250+ AmeriCorps volunteers • 20+ volunteer organization partners * As of December 2008 DURING - Planting of Columbian Water Harvest Garden Area, 2003 Planting Water Harvest Garden
  • 6. Ecosystem Transect Garden Nautilus Shade Structure Gateway Detail Kid’s drawings Main Entry Dragonfly Hopscotch Lizard Leap Land Model of Sound Sculpture Fractel Pattern Revealed in Stones Carson Initial Design Concept, Pencil on Trace Paper with AutoCAD Overlay - 2003
  • 7. Before After Phase I Gardens What If Science Garden Area Carson Elementary School Learning Landscape - Denver, CO Role: Project Manager & Designer Years: 2001 (phase I) - 2004 (completion of build) Products: Conceptual Design, Design Documents, Curriculum Development Carson Elementary School is a magnet school for the hearing impaired. I conceived the basic Carson Aerial Photos - BEFORE with Phase I Completed, 2002 (top) and design after conducting several sound studies on-site and interviewing users. A pattern of AFTER with “What If Science Garden” still to be created, 2007 (bottom) elements and forms spreads out across the playground based on both the Fibonacci Series and the paths of sound waves. Playful educational elements include lizard leap-land, “what if” science garden, insect games, transect ecosystem garden, nautilus pavilion, and more.
  • 8. ABBR SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME AMT SIZE COLOR HEIGHT WIDTH Native Plantings Annual Helianthus maximiliana Sunflower, Maximilian #1 GO/SUM-FAL 8 1.50 - 2 Grass Andropogon gerardii Big Blue Stem #1 4-6' 2-3' Grass Calamagrostis acutiflora Karl Foerester #1 4-5' 18-24 Grass Deschampsia cespitosa tufted hair grass #1 1.5 2 Grass Festuca glauca Blue Fescue F15 8- 10 Grass Liatris spicata 'Kobold' Gay Feather #1 PU/JUL-SEP 3 Grass Panicum virgatum 'Heavy Metal' Heavy metal Switch #1 3-4' 12-18 Grass Schizachyrium scoparium Little Blue Stem #1 2.5 2.5 Grass Stipa tenuissima Mexican Feather Grass #1 2-3' 1-2' Perennial Achillea servica serbian yarrow #1 Wh : sp-su 4-8 12-15 Perennial Agastache cana sonaoran sunset #1 Pi : su 18-24 12-15 Perennial Agastache rupestris Hyssop sunset #1 Or-Pi : su-fa 2-3' 2-3' Perennial Amorpha canescens Lead plant #5 2-4' 2-3' Perennial Artemisia cana silver sagebrush #1 3 3 Perennial Artemisia frigida Sage #1 4-12 Perennial Brunnera macrophylla forget-me-not #1 BL : May-June 12-18 Perennial Campanula persicifolia Bellflower,peach leaved #1 BL : ear-lat su 2-3' 18-24 Perennial Coreopsis grandiflora Early Sunrise' #1 Ye : Ear su 18-24 Perennial Echinacea purpurea coneflower #1 Pu/Jul-Sep 24-36 Perennial Epilobium fleischeri willow herb #1 Pi/Sp-Fa 12-18 8-10 Perennial Erigeron compositus Cut Leaf Daisy F15 Wh/L-sp - M-su 4-6 6-12 Perennial Eschscholzia californica California Poppy F15 Or/Ea-sum 1-2' 12-18 Perennial Heliopsis helianthoides Summer sun False sunflower #1 Go/Sum-fall 3-4' 18-24 Perennial Hemerocallis Happy Returns Day lily #1 Ye/Sp-Fall 12-15 12-18 e/Early mid seaso 30-36 Perennial Hemerocallis 'Carey Quinn Red with gold Daylily #1 Perennial Ipomopsis aggregata scarlet gilla F15 RE/SP-FALL 12-24 12-18 Perennial Lavendula angustifolia Hidcote - Lavender #1 BL/ear.sp-sum 8-12 8-12 Perennial Mirabilis mulitflora four oclocks #1 Pu-Re/mid sum 1-3' 2-4' Perennial Nepeta x faasenii 6 hills giant catnip #1 LAV/ear-lat sum 2-3' 2-3' Perennial Oenothera macrocarpa evening primrose #1 LtYE/mid-sum 1-2' 18-24 Perennial Phlox subulata phlox F15 Pi/May - June 6-8 Perennial Salvia nemorosa 'May Night' May night salvia #1 Pu/ear-lat sum 18-24 12-18 Perennial Sedum arce evergreen stone crop-gold moss F15 Ye/May - June 2-4 12-18 Perennial Sedum spurium Red Carpet F15 Re/Jul - Aug 2-4 12-18 Perennial Sempervivum species hens and chicks F15 Re/su 2-6 12-18 Perennial Solidago Golden Baby Golden Rod, #1 Y/JUL -AUG 1.5 Perennial Thymus praecox 'Minus' dwarf creeping thyme F32 pink/ear su 1 6-12 Shrub Antennaria dioica 'Rubra' pussytoes - F15 Pi 2-3 Shrub Asclepsias tuberosa butterfly weed #1 Or : Jul-sep 18-24 Shrub Atriplex canescens Salt brush, four-wing #5 6 3 Chrsothamnus nauseosus albicaulis subs Rabbit Brush Tall Blue #5 3 3 Shrub Shrub Juniperus horizontalis 'Wiltinii' blue rug juniper #5 GREEN 18 6 Shrub Ligustrum vulgare 'Lodense' Lodense Privet #5 2-3' 3-4' Shrub Potentilla atrosanguinea RED cinquefoil #1 RE/SUM 12-18 12-18 Shrub Potentilla fruticosa 'Sutter's Gold' sutters gold potenilla #1 Ye/ear-lat sum 1-2' 2-3' Shrub Prunus virginiana melanocarpa Chokecherry, Native 6.0' Lincoln Elementary School’s Learning Landscape - Initial planting plans (left top and bottom), quick sketch of trees for faculty and student review, (left middle) and native plant list.
  • 9. Neighborhood Kids Playing in the Summer Lincoln Elementary, School 2008. Lincoln Elementary School Learning Landscape - Denver, CO Role: Project Manager & Designer Years: 2005-2006 Products: Planting Plans, Curricular Development, Educational Design Elements Working with Intrinsic Design, I created planting plans and educational elements such as butterfly, multicultural, native, and vegetable gardens; an outdoor amphi- theater, and science areas. Recreational opportunities include playing fields, climbing boulders, and age appropriate play areas.
  • 10. Kinetic Shade Structure - 2003 I designed this shade structure to allow for move- ment of the “masts” which anchor the wing-like roof pieces. The idea was to create awareness about wind and sound and light as the rooftops sway in the breeze. Unfortunately it was never built due to budget constraints. All drawings were drafted in AutoCAD.
  • 11. Learning Landscape Volunteer Projects - Denver, CO Role: Project Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Years: 2001-2007 Volunteers help create and maintain the Learning Landscapes. Projects which I oversaw included: play equipment assembly, sod laying, planting, Volunteers in Action painting murals & banners, painting & setting tiles, building raised planter beds, mulching & weeding, setting pavers, stamping concrete, and more.
  • 12. Educational Murals Created with Students and AmeriCorps NCCC Volunteers at Eagleton Elementary School AmeriCorps NCCC Volunteers Pruning Selected Volunteer Projects
  • 13. Grassed Fields Eagleton Smith Columbian Columbine Capital Improvements Timeline Continued 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Replace Plastic Replace Replace Replace Replace Replace Replace Crack/Seal Coat Crack/Seal Coat Crack/Seal Coat Play Equipment Engineered Engineered Engineered Engineered Engineered Engineered Blacktop Blacktop Blacktop Cowell Wood Fiber Wood Fiber Wood Fiber Wood Fiber Wood Fiber Wood Fiber Cowell Colfax Barrett Fairmont Garden Place Cowell Colfax Barrett Cowell Colfax Fairmont Crofton Castro Greenlee Fairmont Crofton Castro Fairmont Crofton Greenlee Eagleton Columbian Whittier Greenlee Eagleton Columbian Greenlee Eagleton Whittier Munroe Columbine Smedly Whittier Munroe Columbine Whittier Munroe Smedly Remmington Ebert Blacktop Swansea Smedly Remmington Ebert Smedly Remmington Swansea Smith Gilpin Overlay Smith Gilpin Smith Mitchell Swansea Swansea Colfax Mitchell Crofton Blacktop Replace Small Replace Small Eagleton Overlay Grassed Fields Grassed Fields Replace Play Munroe Replace Site Replace Small Cowell Cowell Colfax Blacktop Equipment Remmington Furniture Grassed Fields Fairmont Greenlee Crofton Overlay Smith Garden Place Greenlee Garden Place Swansea Eagleton Columbian Barrett Whittier Whiittier Smith Columbine Castro Smedly Replace Athletic Replace Large Columbian Swansea Columbine Apparatus Grassed Fields Replace Ebert Crack/Seal Coat Garden Place Replace Site Munroe Engineered Gilpin Replace Site Remmington Blacktop Furniture Wood Fiber Replace Large Mitchell Furniture Garden Place Colfax Garden Place Re-Rubberize Grassed Fields Cowell Crofton Erosion Hill Fairmont Fairmont Eagleton Whittier Garden Place Greenlee Munroe Replace Small Replace Large Replace Site Whittier Remmington Grassed Fields Grassed Fields Furniture Smedly Smith Colfax Fairmont Swansea Barrett Crofton Whittier Castro Replace Small Eagleton Columbian Grassed Fields Smith Columbine Cowell Ebert Greenlee Gilpin Replace Small Swansea Mitchell Replace Plastic Grassed Fields Whiittier Play Equipment Columbian Colfax Columbine Crofton Replace Eagleton Artificial Turf Munroe Ebert Rubberize Replace Plastic Remmington Erosion Hill Play Equipment Smith Garden Place Barrett Castro Columbian Columbine Ebert Gilpin Mitchell 20-year Projected Timeline and Budget (2001-2021) Learning Landscape Maintenance Costs Since Denver Public Schools did not have a maintenance schedule or budget, Professor Lois A. Brink, Director of Learning Landscapes, and I created one for them. Costs were calculated based on facility management and contractor estimates to help plan for ongoing maintenance fees and to raise additional money. These budgets were a critical component of the 2003 and 2008 bonds which were passed to help build and maintain the playgrounds. For several years I provided general on-site maintenance checks and special technical assistance as needed.
  • 14. Denver Public Schools Learning Landscape Annual Maintenance Costs for 2008 Built 2000 Built 2001 Built 2001 Built 2001 Built 2001 Built 2001 Built 2001 Built 2001 Built 2002 Built 2002 Built 2002 Built 2002 Built 20 Responsible Unit Price Areas Activity Party Cycle Unit per cycle Inflation RATE Garden Place Cycle Cowell Fairmont Fairview Greenlee Smedley Swansea Whittier Colfax Crofton Eagleton Remington Munroe DPS QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY Cost QTY LANDSCAPE AREAS 2% year Track/Plaza Top Dress Crusher Fines annually SF 0.10 NA 2000 $200 7744 $774 4675 $468 400 $40 1533 $153 3500 2500 4900 1360 Regrade 3.00 3 years SF 0.15 NA 2000 7744 $0 $525 $375 $735 $204 Irrigation Replace 30.00 30 years Repair/Vandalism 1.00 annually LS 5000.00 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 Fertilize , Top Dress, Grass Field Aerate, Mow 1.00 annually SF 0.15 63,000 $9,450 $0 61000 $9,150 NA 70,000 $10,500 $0 43200 $6,480 46800 Soils Prep to replace sod 40K+ sq. ft. 10.00 10 yrs SF 0.15 NA Fertilize , Top Dress, Grassed Areas/Small Field Aerate, Mow 1.00 annually SF 0.15 2500 $375 35000 $5,250 NA NA 32642 $4,896 5400 $810 33000 $4,950 8000 $1,200 13800 $2,070 26400 $3,960 43000 $6,450 NA NA Soil Prep to replace sod 5.00 5 yrs SF 0.35 Trees/Shrubs Replace/Prune 1.00 LS 100.00 1-5yrs per yr. Prune LS 100.00 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 $100 5-15yrs per yr. LS 50.00 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 15-25yrs per yr. Mulch Infill 1.00 3 yrs SF 0.15 2500 3000 1000 6000 2000 4000 2500 $375 5700 $855 6000 $900 2500 $375 5000 Artificial Turf Replace 15 yrs SF 2.50 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Maint -sweeping & infill 1.00 annually SF 0.05 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA HARDSCAPE AREAS Blacktop area Crack/Seal Coat 5.00 5 yrs SY 4.50 $0 Overlay 10.00 10 yrs SY 9.50 Replace 25.00 25 yrs SF 16.50 Repaint- 1.00 annually LS 600.00 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 Repaint- field 3.00 3 years LS 300.00 Concrete Walks/ Replace 30.00 30 yrs SF HARDWARE Annual Repair/Vandalism 1.00 LS 2500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 Site Furniture Replace 15 years LS Athletic Apparatus Replace 20 years LS Playground Equipment Replace plastic parts 25% 10 years LS Replace all 20 years LS EWF Refill 5% annually SF 1.00 13500 $675 10000 $500 13,312 $675 8000 $400 8000 $400 4897 $245 9000 $450 12163 $608 6939 13500 18900 9855 13500 Replace 1.00 6 yrs SF 1.00 $6,939 $13,500 $18,900 $9,855 NON-TRADITIONAL ELEMENTS Rubberized Hills Replace rubber 8 yrs SF 8.00 1200 $9,600 Rock Area NA Shade Structure/Gateway Repair-painting & fabric 5 yrs LS 1200.00 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 MISC. Graffiti Repair Grounds 1.00 annually LS 500.00 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 $500 DPS TOTALS $28,800 $14,650 $20,499 $9,100 $15,196 $10,222 $15,340 $21,161 $18,609 $28,590 $36,885 $26,814 NON-TRADITIONAL ELEMENTS Sculpture Repair Vol/Site Based 3 yrs LS 300.00 $300 Tiles Replace/Repair 3 yrs 1000.00 $1,000 $1,000 Banners Replace 3 yrs LS 1000.00 Repair annual LS 200.00 $200 $200 $200 $200 $200 Murals Replace 7 yrs LS 2500.00 $2,500 Maintenance LS 100.00 Garden Beds/Plots Prune 1.00 annual LS 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Paths/Crusher Fines Replace 4 yrs LS 0.10 EWF Maintenance/til 2.00 year SF 0.05 $675 $500 $666 $400 $400 $245 $450 $608 $347 $675 $945 $493 Plantings Replace 1.00 2yrs LS 250.00 $250 250.00 250.00 250.00 250.00 Site Based Training VOLUNTEERS TOTALS $1,225 $600 $3,366 $600 $700 $345 $750 $708 $1,697 $2,325 $1,295 $843 $31,250 $15,850 $27,231 $10,300 $16,596 $10,912 $16,840 $22,578 $22,003 $33,240 $39,475 $28,500 SCHOOL TOTALS
  • 15. Before - looking north towards main intersection After - looking north towards main intersection Residential Design - Denver, CO Role: Designer Year: 2008 I landscaped this small property using as much free and found material as possible. Sandstone was reclaimed from a local site and many plants were started from seed or were propagated. Final material costs were under $1000. Bird feeder made from found objects
  • 16. After - Construction in progress looking southwest towards house Before - looking southwest towards house Trellis under construction Birdfeeder made with found objects Vegetable garden in driveway Water fountain made with recycled copper
  • 17. Teaching Philosophy “What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing.” ~ Aristotle I am a firm believer in hands-on education and service-learning and make every effort to provide students with the opportunity for both as often as possible. I know that enthusiasm is contagious and strive to engage my students in thoughtful and provoca- tive dialogue on a regular basis. When teaching design courses I encourage students to take “leaps of faith” and to experiment. As an instructor I try to instill self-confidence and to teach communication skills using a variety of media. There is no one way to design or to think. Students need to learn what works best for them and then to challenge themselves to push beyond their comfort zones. As a process-oriented person, I am less concerned about final products in entry-level courses than I am about what is being learned and how well students craft their projects. As students gain confidence, knowledge, and skills, I expect them to produce work which clearly demonstrates an understanding of design principles, human behavior, site selection, plant and material selection, ecology, and sustainability. What students and volunteers have said about me... “To a creator of dreams, a purveyor of imagination...Thank you Bambi for an amazing experience this round. Your dedication is contagious and your perseverence is inspirational.” ~ AmeriCorps NCCC Earth Four Team, 2006 “As a current student of hers in Advanced Planning Methods II, I am often astounded at the alacrity with which Bambi is able to explore and explain even the most nuanced aspects of planning research methods. Her nimble intellect is exceptional, as she can clearly maneuver between in-depth statistical analysis, art historical methods of visual perception and design, the psychological underpinnings of human behavior, and proven techniques of successful community development efforts to improve the sustainability and design of the built environment.” ~ Deryn Ruth Goodwin, Graduate Student, 2008 “Her teaching technique is well-structured, thorough, and energetic. Ms.Yost has a unique talent in weaving practical examples from her own relevant experience into her lectures - an effect which infuses her teaching with practical, real-world examples that engage and energize her students.” ~ Kristin Kirkpatrick, Graduate Student, 2008
  • 18. Bambi Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. Teaching Portfolio Bambi L Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. 3761 Perry Street Denver, CO 80212 www.BambiLYost.com Bambi_L_Yost@yahoo.com 720.217.2871 c
  • 19. LA ARCH 6290, LA 6686, URP 6686: Learning Landscape: Faculty mentor, Lois Brink, Landscape Architecture, Architecture and Planning Prepared by NOBUKO KOMURA, Urban Planning, Architecture and Planning Finding Common Ground – Students of this course work with a Denver Public Elementary School, its constituents, and selected experts to design a master plan for future campus improvements. The intent of this master plan is to lay the foundation for an urban space that responds to the needs of its users, including both the school and its community. These master plans are catalysts for invention and aim to maximize creativity. From the years 1999-2003, UCD in partnership with Denver Public Schools, and a host of other public and private entities raised 10.6 million dollars and constructed 22 Learning Land- scapes for Denver Public Schools. (Course Syllabus) Master Planning Course From the survey results, including children’s favorite playground survey of free drawing, favorite photo votes, photo taking, and existing playground condition surveys, the vision and the goals, as well as a spatial diagrams, are proposed and presented to the school members. Spatial Diagram: Vision: This is the first course in a trilogy of We embrace new opportunities of growth in our neighborhood with the expan- sion of Light Rail and support playgrounds as healthy and sustainable places. We seek a learning landscape at McKinley-Thatcher that will be safer, more inviting, linked to Platt Park, interdisciplinary courses focused on the and a forum of the neighborhood. Goals: Learning Landscapes. In this class Profes- 1. Develop more inviting open space for the neighborhood. 2. Improve the safety and quality of the playground and increase diversity of playground sor Lois A. Brink and I teach graduate equipment. 3. Provide fitness and recreational opportunities for community members as well as for stu- students how to conduct research with dents at McKinley-Thatcher Elementary School. 4. Involve the community in a maintaining their new sustainable landscape, which includes green building materials, energy efficient design, and ecological principles. elementary school students, teachers, staff, 5. Introduce the community to healthy environments by offering native cultivated plantings. and community to create master plans Existing Site Map Turf Space: for Denver Public Schools. These master Under- utilized plans are used to raise money and to help ECE/ Kindergarten, G 1, 2 Play- Main Service ground: Entrance Entrance guide the design process in the design ECE Constricted K Turf Space: y Under- Librar studio. All plans are reviewed by Denver 1 432 utilized Gym Intermediate community, Denver Public School facility Playground: Constricted Children’s Perception: examples of the survey results managers, teachers, students, contractors, Source of the aerial photo: Terra Server and practitioners before being approved. Journeys of the playground By Heather Hufford Basketball/Tetherball Ball Field: Outdoor Class- N I would want a climbing wall on the play- Space: Under- room: ground because it feels like you are on a Completed master plans go under review Isolated from other stu- journey to reach the top of the tallest utilized Under-utilized dents’ outdoor activities mountain in the world. When you are at the top, you feel good for surviving the challenge. When you look north, you Favorite Photos: again prior to build. see opening sea with a mouth of blue darkness. Look in the east, as if a dark shadow covers the Earth. Look to the Free drawing/Monkey bar Photo taking/Planets on the ground south, you see a flock of birds heading toward warmth of the Earth. Look in the 40 31 Votes for Photo 29 29 28 west, a sunset saying go and sleep in 30 21 19 19 14 14 14 20 13 13 the peaceful night. (Grade 2, McKinley- 9 9 9 7 5 4 10 3 Thatcher Primary School) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 P h o to N u m b e r I like it I do not like it Free drawing/Swings Photo taking/Dog sculpture Free drawing/Tire Swing, Basketball... Photo taking/Hand prints What I like and do not like at the school playground Source: Learning Landscape Survey Board Student Work: Nobuko Komura - Master Plan Research
  • 20. Mitchell’s Built Shade Structure, 2005 Student Work: Cindy Craig Harper - Mitchell Elementary School Illustrative Design & Shade Structure Model ARCH 6910, LA 6720, URP 6686: Designing Common Ground - Interdisciplinary Studio IV/VI This advanced studio is the second course in a trilogy of classes focused on the Learning Landscapes. In this studio graduate students create design documents for Denver Public Schools. These documents build on master plans created in a previous course. All designs are reviewed by Denver community, Denver Public School facility managers, faculty, students, contractors, and practitioners before being approved and submitted to the School Student Work: District for the bidding process. Pamela Bjorlo & Jason Kost - Gathering Area Student Work: Darby Brooks Presenting Design Documents & Study Models
  • 21. ARCH 6910, LA 6686, URP 6686: Building Common Ground – Interdisciplinary Design-Build Course In this third Learning Landscape course students gain hands-on experience working on murals, benches, banners, gardens, raised beds, concrete walkways, brick pillars, retaining walls, game tables, tiles, and more. Denver Public School students, faculty, facility managers, engineers, and contractors work with graduate students. I have taught this site-based service-learning course for several years. I believe this class offers some the best, and most enjoyable, learning opportunities and is well worth the effort. Students participating in design-build activities Student Tim Prescott operating a bobcat for the first time under my supervision
  • 22. Students participating in design-build activities
  • 23. Student Work: Jen Goings - 12” x 16” Ink on Arches Paper ENVD 2002: Environmental Design Graphic Media In this introductory graphics course I teach hand rendering, freehand drawing, and technical drafting using a variety of media. Different types of drawings produced include: gestural, diagrammatic, perspective, axonometric and plan oblique, Composition, texture, color, typography, light, shadow, and graphic standards are explored in-depth. Special emphasis on cognitive aspects of drawing (Gestalt principles, visual perception, etc) are highlighted throughout the semester.
  • 24. Student Work: Clockwise from the Top - Character Sketches by Todd Anderson (pencil), Sarah Zarba (ink), and Liz Smith (charcoal) Student Work: “Resources for the Homeless Map” by Lillian Ruiz, 16” x 16” Ink on Mylar
  • 25. Student Work: Gwathmey Residence and Studio Perspectives by Mikkel Christensen (top left), Christin Brandow (top right), Lillian Ruiz (bottom left), & Jill Petre (bottom right)
  • 26. ENVD 2002: Environmental Design Graphic Media Con’t. Student Work: Plan, Elevation, & Section Drawings by Jeremy Walters, 16” x 16” Pencil on Vellum Student Work: Exploded Axonometric Drawings by Lillian Ruiz (top) & Mikkel Christensen (bottom), 16” x 16” Ink on Mylar
  • 27. Student Work: “Senseless: There’s a Whole World Out There” - Psychogeographic art installation by Tom Johnston ENVD 2001 Social Factors in Environmental Design Psychogeographic mapping and cognitive mapping are the two main projects in this course. As a Teaching Assistant I gave a special hands-on collaborative workshop on how to create psychogeographic art installations as part of a personal derives project. I also taught students how to collect and analyze cognitive maps using Kevin Lynch’s methods. Although I no longer serve as a Teaching Assistant for this course, I still give guest lectures and workshops.
  • 28. Student Work: Cognitive Map Project by Ashley Micikas, 11” x 17” Ink on Mylar Student Work: Cognitive Map Project by Tom Johnston, 11” x 17” Pencil on Vellum
  • 29. Student Work: Dan Powers - Artifact Installation Chatauqua Park, Boulder, CO ENVD 1004 Introductory Studio As the main instructor for this undergraduate introductory design studio I related all projects to Chatauqua Park, a local open space area, so that they could actually explore their site in person. In this studio students were required to create 1) an artifact from found objects on the site, 2) a simple shelter, 3) a village, and 4) a garden cottage. The emphasis of this studio is on concept, process, and model-making. with special attention to site analysis and experiential learning.
  • 30. Student Work: Taylor Pridgen -Artifact Project Student Work: Breannah Stroh - Artifact Project Student Work: Ian Swallow - Simple Shelter Using Only Natural Objects
  • 31. Student Work: Concept Collage by Alex Michalik Student Work: Dylan Warren and Jackie Lee work on their Village Model (left), completed Village Model (middle), Jonathan Miller and Kayla Steffek work on their Village Model (right) Student Work: Garden Cottage Model by Alex Michalik, Rodolfo Romero, Leigh Levato, and Tony Munoff
  • 32. Student Work: Clockwise top left to bottom left - Shelter Model by Charlie Umbarger, Breannah Stroh presenting Garden Cottage Model, Village Model Close-Up, Ian Swallow with Garden Cottage Model, Garden Cottage Model by Alex Hoover, and Garden Cottage Model by Kayla Steffek
  • 33. Student Work: Alex Michalik - 8”x20” Collage (top) and Sketchbook Drawings (bottom)
  • 34. Student Work: Alex Michalik - Sketchbook Drawings
  • 35. Artist’s Statement When admiring a painting, Don’t examine the paint. When meeting an artist, Don’t look at the brush. ~ Taoist Deng Ming-Dao Interactions and transformations have always fascinated me. I am particularly drawn to people and places in transition and find that I am most inspired when trying to express the moments or places “in between.” What is unseen or unsaid is of- ten most appealing. I am not sure if this is because I am constantly in search of answers or if it is because dynamic relation- ships are more frequently charged and alive but I do know that I prefer places and themes of cross-over, edges, transitions, and contrasts. In particular I love ecosystem “edges” and apply ecological principles to man-made environments whenever I think about designing for people. After all, we inhabit cities in much the same way that a deer lives in the forest. My creative work tends to be very conceptual and diverse as I love to experiment with materials and ideas. When making things I prefer to use natural or found objects and inexpensive or recycled things. I typically start with a few loose sketch- es, words, and conceptual models and then just keep producing until I am spent. I am definitely in the “flow” when creating and love having time which allows for relaxed and intense creative sessions. Poetry and music frequently play an integral role for me when designing. I have been writing songs and poems ever since I can remember. Although much of my work is conceptual and not “practical,” I also enjoy entrepreneurial endeavors and strive to create “win-win” scenarios which are economically feasible and desirable. In particular, I love creating sustainable settings which foster beneficial relationships between people, places, and natural and man-made systems. At my core I am an environ- mentalist who wants to make a difference. I believe in social equity, environmental rights, and the power of place. In fact, I am currently brainstorming with a friend interested in developing a nonprofit focused on economic stability using micro- finance loans and other strategies in third world nations. A dream project of mine is to take students to a third world country as part of a multidisciplinary economic development exchange program which fosters sustainable and aesthetic problem-solving, cultural and global awareness, and empathy for others. To date I have not exhibited much artwork beyond the University setting but I would like to eventually. I have been col- laborating with friends for several years and thrive in team settings. I am currently working on a team art installation titled “There’s No Place Like Home” with Dr. Joe Juhasz and Rori Knudsten. My creative process feeds my soul and makes me feel more human and alive. My hope is that others who read or see or experience my artwork find at least a few things that they can take away with them.
  • 36. Bambi Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. Creative Portfolio Bambi L Yost, M.L.A., M.U.R.P. 3761 Perry Street Denver, CO 80212 www.BambiLYost.com Bambi_L_Yost@yahoo.com 720.217.2871 c
  • 37. “Unseen Exchange” - 8.5” x 11” Mixed Media Collage
  • 38. “Crescent Park In Situ” - 8.5” x 11” Mixed Media Collage Man In Situ “Under the Skin” For this series I focused on the interaction of man and environment. Exploration of a local park revealed layers of conscious and subconscious relationships resulting in a visual and poetic “book” trying to answer the “The Remaking” - 8.5” x 11” Mixed Media Collage question, “What impressions do we make on our environment and what impressions do our environments make on us?”
  • 39. “Human Nature Interacting” - 8.5” x 11” Mixed Media Collage
  • 40. “This earth, like the body of an animal, is wasted at the same time it is repaired.” ~ Hutton “Transforming” - 11” x 17” Mixed Media Collage
  • 41. “Two Points Taking a Walk” - 8’ x 8’ x 3’ Installation Mixed Media Close-Up Images of Installation Point, Line, Plane, & Volume: Waking I created this art installation as part of a studio project and relied heavily on poetry and prose to guide my design and discovery process. Installations, models, videos, paintings, and sketches were created to evoke a sense of wonder and awareness of little things frequently taken for granted. Concepts of duality, “being” and dwelling, and “place-making” were explored in depth.
  • 42. Waking… to the Song of Wolves I am twelve, waking from a sound sleep to the song of wolves. They were back at the flat rock by the maple syrup hut. The moon was full and my blood ran thick with each heartbeat calling me to them. I got out of bed and walked quietly downstairs (missing the fifth step from the top so my sister would not wake. She always worries too much). “Lyrical Lair” - 10” x 10” Collage It was August, just before we had to return to school. The sky was huge! Stars everywhere and a moon so bright you could almost read by the light. They kept howling – long low guttural sounds followed by higher and higher melodies of longing. “Pine” - 8.5” x 11” I knew that feeling. I never wanted to return. I loved the farm and Ink on Mylar the river and the magic of summer more than anything else. My dad and step-mom bought the rundown farm during the 70’s dairy bust in upstate New York. 375 acres filled with beaver dams, porcupines, and more - fields and forest readily available to us. My stepsister and I would explore until dark and then quietly make our way home using only our senses to determine the way. We were adventurers. “Meadow Series” - 11” x 8.5” Ink on Mylar
  • 43. “Inverted Forest” - Flipped 180 degrees “Inverted Forest” - 8.5” x 11” Ink on Mylar Painting Inverted Forest - night and day As part of a personal exploration, I created a series of drawings and models which explore the dualities of place. Experiments with anamorphic drawings, inverted paintings, and figure ground studies express complex relationships shifting with the viewer’s perspective. The paintings above are exactly the same but one has been flipped 180 degrees. This painting is about being on the edge and crossing over into twilight and other realms of understanding.
  • 44. Cultivating Extinction flame goes out, night grows cold you lie beside me, dead to my touch offering a corpse, a lifeless shell veiled in veneer, an object to behold detached and alien, origins unknown unspoken losses fallen, silent at your feet waking ghosts of what was and what will be linger in shadows calling into unknown and unpredictable flow living dead, longing to breath deep civilized nature repressing instincts instinctual nature repressing civilization in middle, living exists animating inanimate pausing, lengthening, overlapping, interacting where gathering occurs, life manifests self exploding with potential full of all - death, decay, rebirth, growth mutation, transformation, metamorphosis intrinsically soul full overflowing with memories, passions, possibilities fears driving desires to make a mark, leave a trace, create artifacts dynamic forces tearing down creating new immortality glistens jewel out of reach without meaning makers left to read, remember, repeat Narrative Landscape technology driving heartbeats cash feeding souls As part of my exploration of dwelling, I created concept windswept land mines crashing far below models, a video using Adobe Premiere, and an art installa- civilized dreams consuming instincts tion related to my poem at right. empty and incomplete edges made broken middles part whole
  • 45. Crown Hill Crematorium in Space,Time, Motion, and Memory In this series of photographs and pencil drawings I attempted to reveal how we move through and experience place both during exploration and afterwards in our memories. Many sketches and composites were drawn and erased and redrawn much like our fleeting glimpses of the past.
  • 46. “Crown Hill Crematorium in Time, Space, Motion, & Memory” - 24” x 36” Composite Pencil Drawing
  • 47. “It’s about relationships, not points.” 18” x 24” Clay and Pasta Study Model 24” x 36” Hand-Rendered Grading Plan
  • 48. Reciprocal Nature of Design I designed these two sites as studio projects with the theme of reci- procity in mind. I have always been intrigued by dynamic relationships and “living” systems. The sustainable energy park on the opposite page includes solar panels and wind turbines to supply energy for the park and neighbor- ing residential and commercial areas in exchange for additional access roads and land. The park edges were kept open to allow for easy flow of wildlife and people. Ditches and mounds add variety and provide a sense of privacy for visitors and residents. Creative use of zoning and design resulted in a mixed-use area meant to stimulate the economy while enhancing natural areas. The residential design on this page was set in a cypress swamp and provides wildlife habitat and bird watching and boating opportunities. 36” x 42” Pencil Drawing with Close-Up
  • 49. Drawings in Pencil and Charcoal Technical, gestural, and realistic drawings created with pencils and charcoal fill my sketchbooks.
  • 50. “Chick-fil-A Production and Distribution Map” - 24” x 36” Illustrator Drawing and Flash Video
  • 51. “Sub-Urban Mining Timeline” - 1’ x 5’ Photoshop, Illustrator, & InDesign Drawing Fast Food Nation: Sub-Urban Mining - Claiming Hidden Resources Fast food chains impact our environments and personal health on a global scale. I created these graphics as part of a studio project focused on production and distribution networks for Chick-fil-A’s fast food restaurants. This research lead to greater understanding of how our food choices impact our land uses and physical environments. Most people associate waistlines with fast food but in this project I “Sub-Urban Mining Corridors and analyzed waste-lines instead. It is estimated that approximately 200 Site Map” - Excerpt from 5’ x 5’ AutoCAD, Photoshop, Illustrator, & pounds of food waste is produced for every $1,000 in restaurant InDesign Drawing sales, which means that in an area like Denver, with over 500 fast food restaurants alone, an enormous amount of waste is available for worm composting. I actually proposed a business plan to Commerce City based on this design. At the time everyone wondered if my idea were really feasible but now, six years later, Denver is implementing a similar program using residential waste for worm composting. I have no doubt that fast food restaurants will be used for something like this in the future. “Corporate social responsibility is achieving commercial success in ways that honor ethical values and respect for communities, the natural environment, and people.” “Future Transit” - 8.5” x 11” Photoshop Collage -Business for Social responsibility (BSR), a non-governmental organization whose mission is to promote corporate social responsibility
  • 52. Thank you for your time. Bambi

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