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EPUB3 is a standard for interoperable e-books that is rapidly being adopted by the publishing and device manufacturing community. It has the promise of allowing publishers to create a single file …

EPUB3 is a standard for interoperable e-books that is rapidly being adopted by the publishing and device manufacturing community. It has the promise of allowing publishers to create a single file format that can be rendered on any reading device, such as an e-reader, tablet, laptop, smartphone, etc. This will be a critical component of a library's e-book services, since libraries must be in a position to serve patrons who come in with a range of devices, not simply from one particular supplier. Understanding the e-book files and why EPUB will allow a broader range of fulfilling patron needs is something that both publishers and librarians need to understand. Join us for a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of EPUB3, suggested tools for implementation, barrier issues on the horizon, and the significant improvements in accessibility with EPUB.

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  • Epub3 – interoperable ebook format.We want to focus this session on what EPUB is and does, but equally (perhaps more importantly) why it is important for the library community.  The movement toward a singular ebook format will allow libraries to provide content to patrons on nearly any device, from nearly any publisher, and in a format that is potentially more accessible (to the print-disabled) and more likely to be preservable.  It will also help to avoid the kind of vendor lock in that is also a result of proprietary book formats. make the connection between the needs of the library community for an interoperable format and those that are trying to create and promote it.
  • Today I’ll discuss four thingsEpub in libraries and what it means to patronsThe challenges librarians and library users face with multiple ebook formatsThe benefits and advantages that librarians and users will discover with epub3 ebooksRoadblocks to full epub3 adoption by all publishers, device makers, and others in the information industry.
  • If you went into a library today and spoke with a patron who was seeking an ebook and asked them,Would you like that in epub3 format.The response you would likely get is:
  • Ewhat? Most library users are not on a first name basis with epub, epub3, mobi, kf8, azw, or any other file format. Christopher Platt from the NYPL said to me in an email – Our patrons prefer ebooks that sync to their device of choice without any wrangling on their part.  Whether that's a smartphone, a tablet, or an e-reader.   Ergo the format should flow with the type of device they're using.   I don't think they honestly know "epub3".  
  • Unfortunately, our users are faced with a variety of ebook formats on a regular basis, most of the time probably unaware of the format they are using. The number and type of format is very confusing. This is why I am happy to see the growth and ongoing adoption of epub and now epub3. it brings consistency to an otherwise chaotic choice of formats for any number of reading devices.
  • Libraries face a number of challenges with multiple ebook formats. Most common of these is confusion on the part of the patron as to what file type they need, or what the file type means. Because many of our vendors use file types inconsistently, it becomes more problematic. The sheer number of vendor interfaces (particularly those that are proprietary format) also causes confusion. It leads to inconsistent use and treatment of ebooks.Libraries are all about service and providing the best user experience. We’ve been able to do a really fine job with this until the recent advent of ebooks. Devices, formats, vendors, DRM, and a host of other factors have led to a variety of technical failures from our users, particularly with downloading files. As a result, many libraries have had to offer hands-on training classes related to ebook reading devices, downloading library ebooks and audiobooks. The training has been popular and brings many users into our buildings, so I’m not complaining. But, it is difficult for staff to keep up.
  • It’s no wonder then, that When Pew Internet asked the library staff members in an online panel about these services, the three that were most popular were classes on e-borrowing, classes on how to use handheld reading devices, and online “ask a librarian” research services.Many librarians said that their libraries were already offering these resources in various forms, due to demand from their communities.
  • Vendors have followed suit, often times taking the lead for library technical support with ebook downloads. Here are a few examples from library vendors with descriptions for different ebook formats.Also here is a screen shot from a library libguide showing the huge variety of instructions for ebook downloading to various devices.
  • Library Journal’s survey of ebook use in public libraries asked public librarians about the format preference for ebooks in libraries. In last year’s study, they found that competing ebook formats and hardware devices were a substantial barrier to offering ebooks to library users.
  • I wanted to share this quote from the library journal survey. This is from a librarian speaking about patrons.Read quote.Many of these frustrations have been cleared up with the newer tablet devices that allow the overdrive media console application, but for traditional ereaders, this lengthy download process for epub titles is quite cumbersome. It’s no surprise to me that once Kindle formats were available to public libraries, users preferred this easier download process. I certainly did.
  • Library Journal’s patron profiles, January 2012Looked at the Barriers and ebook user behaviorThere are two factors that are currently reducing ebook borrowing behaviors. In the current survey, 23% of ebook patrons reported being unsuccessful in borrowing ebooks because of technical difficulty, (Hence, the screen I just showed)The other factor was the availability of content from publishers. Luckily we are seeing this change as more and more of the big six begin to sell content to libraries.
  • Here are a few examples of the download screens that patrons will encounter when downloading ebooks (or chapters of ebooks) from 3 popular library vendors – ebrary, EBSCO, and OverDrive.Ebrary on the left, shows multiple options to download a chapter or the entire document. One mentions PDF, the other Adobe Digital Editions. Note the reference to….but not the kindle.Ebsco, on the top right shows the PDF format and the viewing requirements for various devices.OverDrive, at the bottom, shows the kindle, epub, and pdf versions. It’s obvious to me as a kindle user which option I should choose. But for a new user with a new device, this choice could be overwhelming.
  • Libraries face a number of challenges with multiple ebook formats. Most common of these is confusion on the part of the patron as to what file type they need, or what the file type means. Because many of our vendors use file types inconsistently, it becomes more problematic. The sheer number of vendor interfaces (particularly those that are proprietary format) also causes confusion. It leads to inconsistent use and treatment of ebooks.Libraries are all about service and providing the best user experience. We’ve been able to do a really fine job with this until the recent advent of ebooks. Devices, formats, vendors, DRM, and a host of other factors have led to a variety of technical failures from our users, particularly with downloading files. As a result, many libraries have had to offer hands-on training classes related to ebook reading devices, downloading library ebooks and audiobooks. The training has been popular and brings many users into our buildings, so I’m not complaining. But, it is difficult for staff to keep up.
  • Epub (2.0) has been a growing industry standard. Many publishers are now offering content in the epub format. Some publishers are also moving to epub3 as well.Jamie LaRue, Director of the Douglas County Libraries said about epub adoption - We have found that virtually none of the 900+ publishers we deal with report either surprise or difficulty in providing that format. I asked my collection people where the epub format was on the adoption curve. To a person, they said “over the hump.” We still have a few publishers who can only provide a pdf, but it’s rare. More often, even the little publishers are asking us if we can handle epub3.Scott Wasinger of EBSCO said By the end of 2013, we expect over 50% of newly added titles to be in EPUB format; this will rise to over 70% in 2014.OUP has over 5,000 titles in the epub 2 format
  • The beauty of epub3 is that it is an open format that can be consumed on any variety of devices – laptops, netbooks, tablets, ereaders, etc.libraries and schools are in the center of “bring your own device”Our patrons use any and every possible device.We can only hope that the adoption of epub3 will provide a similar user experience to all of these users and their individual devices.
  • This study from the Pew Internet project from early 2012 shows how users read their ebooks. This was the most recent data I could find on how users read the ebook content, there is much more recent data on the devices they own, however. When this data was taken, ereader ownership was higher than tablets, so I would imagine the tablet use is higher now.This shows the variety of E-book reading happens across an array of devices, including smartphones. In our December survey we found that e-book readers age 16 and older were just as likely to have read an e-book on their computers as had read e-book reader devices specifically made for e-book consumption. Cell phones are reading devices, too:  42% of readers of e-books in the past 12 months said they consume their books on a computer  41% of readers of e-books consume their books on an e-book reader like original Kindles or Nooks  29% of readers of e-books consume their books on their cell phones  23% of readers of e-books consume their books on a tablet computer.3
  • Epub3 is reflowable. This allows the content to adapt to whatever screen size the user has. It allows for users to change the font size, instantly creating large print materials.This is particularly relevant to those who serve users with low vision. Often they are finding large print titles unavailable. Providing ereaders to patrons with the same titles allows one to create a large print book instantly. A great example of this is from the Dayton Metro Library in Dayton Ohio. They are using SONY readers to deliver content to homebound patrons, many of whom were unable to find the large print titles they wanted.
  • These images show the difference between a textbook page on a computer and mobile device screen. The one with page fidelity (more of the pdf type file) is unable to change size. Here users must turn the mobile phone sideways and enlarge the screen to be able to read the text. The reflowable text sizes up according to the screen that is available.
  • Another great feature of epub3 for libraries is embedded multimedia and interactivity. Audio and video files can be embedded into content. Media overlays are also usedMedia Overlays synchronize audio clips with text by tying the structured audio narration to its corresponding text (or other media) in the EPUB Content Document using SMIL markup. Media Overlays are, in fact, a simplified subset of SMIL 3.0 that allow the playback sequence of these clips to be defined.quizzes
  • Many of these multimedia and interactive features are great for textbooks, children’s materials, reference books, etc. The latest BISG, epub3 compatibility chart shows that several of the major digital textbook companies are compatible for adding these features in epub3.This is a great benefit for academic and school libraries who may be involved in purchasing digital textbooks for the campus.
  • Accessibility is extremely important to libraries. We must be ADA compliant with all of our services and buildings. Providing access to digital content has made compliance with ADA very tricky for libraries. Several libraries have been sued by the NFB for purchasing ebook readers that were not accessible.
  • The purpose of ePub3, section 4 is to facilitate content accessibility.It includes coding for navigation, semantic markup, dynamic layouts, aural renditions and media overlays, fallbacks, and scripting.This section brings extreme value to epub3.The url at the bottom will lead you to the specs in section 4.
  • Earlier this year ALA’s digital content working group released an Ebook scorecard – primarily for public librariesThe scorecard is recommended for libraries to evaluate ebook publishers and vendors on a set of 15 different criteriaRatings are from 1- 5.One of the criteria is about accessibility and says:On a 5 point scale rank the publisher’s provision of accessible ebook content in which 1 indicates no commitment to accessibility and 5 indicates all ebook content offered is in fully implemented DAISY or PUB3 format.
  • Epub3 also offers a variety of other features that users use and like includingBookmarksAnnotationsChapter and TOC links created automaticallyAnd copy/paste featuresGranted other ebook formats and proprietary platforms offer several of these features as well.
  • I often wonder if the adoption of an open, interoperable ebook format would lead to better discovery of content. Would this single format allow us to create more robust discovery tools?Would it prevent all of our content from living in separate silos?Discovery of content is critical for use. Use is critical for libraries to justify purchasing additional content.
  • No doubt about it, the biggest roadblock is amazon.The almightlyamazon, with its proprietary format (sometimes referred to as the cousin of epub) is not open to the open and interoperable standard.Why should they be? They control market share and strive to lock-in customers with cheap content, great services, and new technologies around every corner.
  • Pew’s study in early 2012 showed the amazon kindle with 62% of the ebook reader market share
  • This same study looked at tablet ownership. At the time, the kindle fire was at 14%, however we all know that the ipad, the top tablet device, allows users to add the kindle reading app.
  • This final chart from pew shows the growth over time of ebook readers and tablets. Already the growth of tablet devices has overtaken ereaders. Many in the industry say the ereader is history, a doomed technology.Tablets will rule the future. This is great for epub3 because even the kindle fire tablet device can read epub3 content.
  • Amazon offers a number of ePubereading apps from their own Android Appstore, in fact. But unfortunately Amazon is petty and made it so none of the ePub apps show up on the Kindle Fire, claiming they are incompatible when they clearly are not.The good news is Amazon graciously lets us load apps onto our Kindle Fire tablets from non-Amazon sources, so loading ePub apps is as easy as finding the APK files from other appstores and websites.But first, to enable the installation of apps from outside the Amazon Appstore, you have to open the Kindle Fire’s settings menu, select Device, then turn on “allow installation of applications from unknown sources”.If you haven’t done this with your fire yet, I highly recommend it. Start with your public libraries Overdrive media console. You’ll be pleased to see you can borrow kindle, pdf, or epub formats.
  • Another barrier to full adoption is PDF
  • PDF has long been a standard in libraries of all types. It is a standard software on every public computer in every library.While I have no scientific proof of this, I would bet that most libraries do not have an epub reader installed on their public computers. PDF has been our bread and butter for years for journal content, ebook content, and other user generated documents. It’s is the primary format for reading full-text content in academic libraries
  • This may be one indication as to why so many faculty and students in academic libraries still use laptops or desktops. It’s easier to search, create, read, annotate, and cite for academic research using larger devices.Since most of our content is in PDF, it makes consuming the content on phones or small ereaders difficult due to the inability to resize most of the files.
  • Library Journal asked in their annual survey of ebook in us libraries about which format users generally prefer for ebooks.
  • As you can see from the yellow bars, PDF remains king in academic libraries. EPUB is on the rise, as is “optimized for my reader”, but both fall very short to the PDF format
  • School libraries were all over the place, but do show a trend for the decreased use of PDF and the increased use of optimized for readers.I think as more and more schools adopt interactive textbooks and supplementary materials, the shift to epub3 will follow.
  • Not surprising, the use of epub files in public libraries was the largest.There is definitely a downward trend for PDFOptimized for reader is nearly even with epub which is not surprising since kindle formats and epub formats are both very popular in public libraries.Christopher Platt at the NYPL said of the downloads, We do have about 50% of our monthly ebook usage happening on Kindle devices,
  • Another roadblock is DRM
  • What is the point of a free and open ebook standard when…
  • Once can wrap DRM around it and prevent the interoperability and full use of the content
  • What makes it more cumbersome is the variety and type of DRM systems available.
  • Publishers, aggregators, and retailers will set their own roadblocks for epub3 adoption.While many have adopted epub2.0 and offer thousands of titles that way, the rate of adoption/production in epub3 is not as far along.
  • Why is this?According to Margaret Harrison at OUP - As long as EPUB3 is seen as a sort of EPUB-plus format – a format that’s separate from EPUB2  rather than simply a new version with backwards-compatibility (albeit not perfect compatibility) – the industry will resist it. Adoption would certainly be accelerated if the IDPF led an industry-wide migration from 2 to 3, announcing a date when publishers & conversion partners should stop producing EPUB2. This of course would require close collaboration with retailers to ensure they will accept the new version.She also said that publishers are also a little overwhelmed by the possibilities in EPUB3. Suddenly ebooks can behave a little more like apps – and everyone who has worked on an app knows what a meticulous and resource-intensive undertaking it can be. Whereas static EPUB2 is often a close replica of the print, EPUB3 presents publishers with more creativity. This demands the consideration of each individual EPUB as its own bespoke project. The larger trade houses like Random House and Hachette are well-equipped to take advantage of the features in EPUB3, as their content-creation processes have already evolved to consider ebooks as a separate content output rather than a copy of the print book. The majority of the publishing world, however, has yet to undergo this transition.
  • If we look at some of the major library vendors and their ebook formats, we do see a number with epub available.This chart was compiled by my colleague, MirelaRoncevic, who wrote a Library Technology Report on ebook content providers. This data was compiled late last fall and some of these offerings may have changed.
  • These are the words of a librarian who responded to the library journal survey on ebook use in libraries.
  • My final roadblock for epub3 is the next big thing.Is there going to be a next big thing for ebooks? Ebook formats? Will the next big thing be so much better than epub3 that publishers scramble to develop content for it rather than epub3?
  • A few final conclusions/thoughts
  • I’d like to thank several individuals whom I consulted while developing this presentation. As a librarian, it’s important to me to gather input from a variety of individuals involved in the use, creation, and distribution of ebooks to gain a broader insight into the myriad of issues that face us.
  • So, there are perhaps a few helpful ways to illustrate this project. One is to think back 1000 years. Most of the conversations , and realize how we’re really missing most of what’s happened around the documents, events, and advancements
  • MagnaCarta in 1215.
  • There’s no shortage of things to annotate.Laws Scientific articlesTweetsNewsWikipediaJournal articlesBooksData
  • As we move forward. How do we ensure that
  • Time is really one of the most powerful design constraints around this problem.
  • It was perhaps VanNEEvar Bush that first had this dream--
  • Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified. The lawyer has at his touch the associated opinions and decisions of his whole experience, and of the experience of friends and authorities. The patent attorney has on call the millions of issued patents, with familiar trails to every point of his client's interest. The physician, puzzled by a patient's reactions, strikes the trail established in studying an earlier similar case, and runs rapidly through analogous case histories, with side references to the classics for the pertinent anatomy and histology. The chemist, struggling with the synthesis of an organic compound, has all the chemical literature before him in his laboratory, with trails following the analogies of compounds, and side trails to their physical and chemical behavior.The historian, with a vast chronological account of a people, parallels it with a skip trail which stops only on the salient items, and can follow at any time contemporary trails which lead him all over civilization at a particular epoch. There is a new profession of trail blazers, those who find delight in the task of establishing useful trails through the enormous mass of the common record.
  • http://rapgenius.com/Marc-andreessen-why-andreessen-horowitz-is-investing-in-rap-genius-lyrics#lyric[READ]So the question is… how do we get this back into the browser.D
  • What I didn’t know at the time was how many people had had the same idea.
  • An annotation is like an arrow with a payload
  • Here’s one by Isaac Newton.
  • The target is a place inside a book. Here, a treatise on optics.The content is what was scribbled there.The author, of these scribbles, in this case: Sir Isaac Newton.
  • So– What explains the popularity of 3D printing?Perhaps its that it has revolutionized our ability to interact with the world of things.It’s changed the balance of power.Things used to be created by companies, by industries… far away…. in china.But with 3D printing *we* can make things.And we can do really interesting things, like print connectors that let us attach Legos to Tinkertoys and Bristle Blocks and Erector Sets and …. Zoob (whatever Zoob is).So maybe that’s the really interesting thing about Annotation. Maybe it’s the reason we’ve all shown up here today…. Because annotation lets us break the paradigm of the web as constructed by other people.My favorite example of which is the Free Universal Construction Kit. Because, you know, you always wanted to be able to connect your legos to your erectorIn the same way Maybe annotation represents our ability to connecthttp://fffff.at/free-universal-construction-kit/The Free Universal Construction Kit
  • How do we link on the net now? Once and to the top.
  • But with an annotation, our blogger can now link within the document instead. And the annotation can serve as a kind of footnote. Because we’re able to link to specific targets, we’re able to connect ideas for the first time.
  • Instead of just linking once, we can begin to link more richly…
  • connecting multiple concepts and ideas.
  • It can be anything. Any kind of media, movies, pdfs, pictures, even data. As long as it has an address or a signature that we can point to or reference.
  • It can be anything. Any kind of media, movies, pdfs, pictures, even data. As long as it has an address or a signature that we can point to or reference.http://itee.uq.edu.au/~eresearch/annocryst-pymol.php
  • All we’re trying to do is enable conversations… but in order to do that at scale on the Internet, we need a squelch knob.For those of you who are ham radio operators, you may be familiar with the squelch knob. It lets you set a noise floor, a signal floor, below which you hear nothing. Pure silence. And above which you hear the transmission. For us, spam and what are affectionately known as obvious trolls– those who have no interest in participating constructively in a conversation– fall below that noise threshold. We will use primarily identity based techniques like two-factor authentication to provide a squelch knob function there. Above that is where helpful conversation is taking place. There we’ll use meta-moderation techniques to expand headroom in the signal of quality conversation.I’ll talk a little more about how we implement that later.
  • Demo
  • ******DEMO *******
  • Greater control over distributionMore straightforward workflowEasier to track which vendors get which formats
  • Workflow when publishers assign ISBNs to each individual format.
  • More title records to manageHave to buy more ISBNsSeems like there’s just a lot more to track
  • Fewer title recordsPerceived cost savings on ISBNs - use them sparingly
  • Less control over metadata in supply chain - harder to correct Fragmented workflow/competing spreadsheetsHarder to track which files are going to which vendors
  • Workflow when a publisher assigns a single ISBN to all digital formats.
  • Which looks more organized? Which looks more like something will probably get lost in transmission?
  • Explosion of books in “print” – in 1998 there were 900,000; in 2012 there are 32 MILLIONThe Opportunity in Abundance - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kThFkIAHZgQ
  • More file formats = more productsMore products = more product dataMore product data = more cost to marketAll = more investment (and thought) in managing workflow
  • Sounds very neatly packaged up. But we all know reality isn’t like this.
  • The dreaded eISBN has permeated even Library Journal!!!! eBook vendors are asking for “eISBNs” in their templates! At Bowker we get dozens of calls from publishers wanting eISBNs!!!!Deciding how to identify digital content is anything but clear.
  • In 2005 an independent start-up began offering “eISBNs” to be assigned to ebooksWhile Bowker reached out and educated this company, which stopped their offering, the term “eISBN” has been in existence ever since
  • ISBNs identify “monographic publications: text that stands on its own as a product, whether printed, audio or electronic.”Audiobooks do not get “aISBNs”Calendars do not get “cISBNs”
  • There are 46000 items in BIP that are classified as “Other” – T-shirts, mugs, bookmarks, etc. They all have ISBNs because they are traded in the book supply chain. And it is ONLY in the book supply chain that these ISBNs get used – these items might have other identifiers as well, for other supply chains, such as apparel.
  • Assignment of ISBNs not just tradable objects, but also tradable PARTS of books – if you’re selling chapters one at a time, for example. Anything that goes out in the book supply chain (outside of walled-garden environments such as Amazon or a publisher’s own website) gets an ISBN.
  • Let the kittens live. If you have questions about ISBN assignments, please get in touch!
  • O’Reilly book
  • Test duite screenshot within Readum
  • Test suite screen shot: results form
  • Screen shot of ibooks and ADE showing the same O’Reilly book with video

Transcript

  • 1. http://www.niso.org/news/events/2013/virtual/epub3NISO Virtual Conference: EPUB3 and the Future of Interoperable E-books: What Libraries Need to Know April 17, 2013 11:00a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (EST)
  • 2. NISO Virtual Conference: EPUB3 and the Future of Interoperable E-books: What Libraries Need to KnowAgendaIntroductions and Moderation – Todd Carpenter, Executive Director, NISOKeynote Speaker• 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM: – Sue Polanka, Head, Reference & Instruction, Wright State University Libraries• 12:00 - 12:45 PM: EPUB and Metadata – Bill Kasdorf, Vice President, APEX
Lunch Break 12:45 PM - 1:30 PMEPUB3: What, How, and Why• 1:30 - 2:15 PM: NISO/DAISY Interchange Format Update – Matt Garrish, Accessibility Consultant; Editor of the Z39.98 and EPUB 3 Specifications• 2:15 - 2:45 PM: Annotation of E-books: A NISO standard in development Dan Whaley, Founder, hypothesis.is• 2:45 - 3:15 PM: Identification of E-books – Laura Dawson, Product Manager, BowkerBreak 3:15 - 3:30 PMImplementation and Implications• 3:30 - 3:50 PM: BISGs EPUB3 Support Grid – Angela Bole, Deputy Executive Director, BISG• 3:50 - 4:10 PM: Implementing an E-book System – Joanne M. Budler, State Librarian, State Library of Kansas• 4:10 - 4:30 PM: Digital Rights Management (DRM) – Jim Dovey, Digital Content Formats Evangelist, KoboFuture of EPUB• 4:30 - 5:00 PM: Roundtable Discussion – George Kerscher, Secretary General DAISY Consortium, and President, International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) and Todd Carpenter, Executive Director, NISO
  • 3. EPUB3 and the Library Community Sue Polanka@noshelfrequired Wright State No Shelf University Required® Libraries
  • 4. Agenda ePub in Libraries Challenges of multiple formats Advantages of EPUB3 as a standard Roadblocks to full adoption
  • 5. Would you like that in ePub3 format?
  • 6. Would you like that in ePub3 format? eWhat?
  • 7. DjVu .djvu PDFeReader TXT BBeB .pdb EPUB /RTF .lrf .lrx Microsoft Reader .lit eBook MobiPocket Formats .prc .mobi pdg Daisy HTML AZW KF8 Kindle Libris .lbr
  • 8. Challenges of Multiple Formats Users confused Inconsistent use Technical failures Service Training needed User Experience
  • 9. Library staff opinions Pew Internet Research Study, 1/22/2013 Three most popular services are:  Classes on e-borrowing  Classes on handheld reading devices  Online ask a librarian service
  • 10. Format Preference in Public LibrariesIn last year’s study, we found that competing ebook formats and hardware devices were a substantial barrier to offering ebooks to library users. Library Journal, Survey of ebook Use in US Public Libraries, 2012
  • 11. Many users are frustrated with how complicated the process is to download ePub books to a computer and then use Adobe Digital Editions to transfer them to an eReader. Kindle users are not nearly as frustrated as everyone else. Library Journal, Survey of ebook Use in US Public Libraries, 2012
  • 12. 23% of library patronsunsuccessful in borrowing ebooks due to technical difficulty Library Journal Patron Profiles, January 2012
  • 13. Challenges of Multiple Formats Users confused Inconsistent use Technical failures Service Training needed User Experience
  • 14. Advantages of EPUB3 for libraries
  • 15. ePUB is a growingstandard in the industry
  • 16. Read on Multiple Devices similar user experience
  • 17. How we read eBooks Tablet Computer 23% Cell Phones 29% eReader 41% Computer 42%Pew Internet & American Life Project, The Rise of E-Reading, April 5, 2012
  • 18. Reflowable Adapts to screen size (mobile!) Change Font Size Instant large print
  • 19. Multimedia and Interactivity Audio Video Media Overlays Quizzes Math ML
  • 20. Multimedia and Interactivity Audio Video Media Overlays Course Quizzes Smart Math ML Inkling Vital Textbooks Source Children’s Books
  • 21. AccessibilityLibraries must be ADA compliant!
  • 22. “Facilitate Content Accessibility” Navigation Semantic Markup ePUB3 Dynamic Layouts Section 4 Aural Renditions and Media Overlays Fallbacks Scripting http://www.idpf.org/epub/30/spec/epub30-overview.html#sec-accessibility
  • 23. ALA eBook Scorecard On a 5 point scale rank the publisher’s provision of accessible ebook content in which 1 indicates no commitment to accessibility and 5 indicates all ebook content offered is in fully implemented DAISY or [e]PUB3 format.
  • 24. Other Special Features Bookmarks Annotations Chapter/TOC links auto created Copy/paste
  • 25. Discovery of Content Would a single format allow us to create more robust discovery tools?
  • 26. Roadblocks to full adoption
  • 27. Pew Internet & American Life Project, The Rise of E-Reading, April 5, 2012
  • 28. Pew Internet & American Life Project, The Rise of E-Reading, April 5, 2012
  • 29. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/E-readers-and-tablets/Findings.aspx
  • 30. http://dearauthor.com/ebooks/yes-you-can-read-epubs-on-the-kindle-fire/
  • 31. PDF
  • 32. PDF Standard software on every library computer Most libraries don’t have epub readers on public computers Journal content eBook content Users method of reading most academic library content
  • 33. Academic Libraries, Technology Used Library Journal Academic Patron Profiles, January, 2013
  • 34. In which format do usersgenerally prefer ebooks?
  • 35. Academic Libraries multiple responses allowed70605040 EPUB30 PDF Optimized/Reader20100 2010 2011 2012 Library Journal, Survey of ebook Use in US Academic Libraries, 2012
  • 36. School Libraries multiple responses allowed302520 EPUB15 PDF10 Optimized/Reader50 2010 2011 2012 Library Journal, Survey of ebook Use in US School Libraries, 2012
  • 37. Public libraries multiple responses allowed70605040 EPUB30 PDF Optimized/Reader20100 2010 2011 2012 Library Journal, Survey of ebook Use in US Public Libraries, 2012
  • 38. DRM
  • 39. ePUB – free and open ebook standard
  • 40. ePUB on DRM
  • 41. ePUB on DRM Apple’s Adobe? Fairplay?
  • 42. Publishers, Aggregators, a nd Retailers
  • 43. Adopting ePUB3 ePUB plus format Backwards compatibility Converting ePUB2 to ePUB3 Slow adoption by retailers & aggregators Endless possibilities for creativity Each book is a little app
  • 44. Library Vendor FormatsChart courtesy, Mirela Roncevic, designed for Library Technology Reports
  • 45. I’ve trusted [vendor] to do the ebook thingthe best/right way. I’m wishing their model would allow for download of titles in epub format for devices. Currently their app for handling doesn’t display things in that format which is cumbersome to my users!
  • 46. What’s the next big thing?
  • 47. Conclusions Multiple formats, vendors, and DRM hinder use of ebooks in libraries PDF remains the dominant format in academic libraries EPUB3 content is needed for more than public libraries Tablet adoption will overtake eReaders, making ePUB3 a more viable option for all makes/models Libraries, publishers, and content providers must adapt to changing technologies and formats, preparing for ePUB3 with software and services
  • 48. Thank You! Margaret Harrison, Oxford University Press Jamie LaRue, Douglas County Libraries Christopher Platt, New York Public Library Mirela Roncevic, Consultant Scott Wasinger & Ken Breen, EBSCO
  • 49. Questions? sue.polanka@ wright.edu Twitter @noshelfrequired noshelfrequired.com
  • 50. Evolution of Z39.86 Z39.98, EPUB 3 and Accessible Ebook Production
  • 51. > What is DAISY • Digital Accessible Information SYstem • Not-for-profit consortium of organizations for the blind and accessible producers formed in 1996 • Maintainers of the ANSI/NISO Z39.86 Digital Talking Book specification (DTBs) • George Kerscher Secretary General of DAISY and President of the IDPF Board • Markus Gylling – CTO of both DAISY and IDPF, Chair of EPUB 3 WG www.daisy.org
  • 52. > Background • Revision of Z39.86 was initiated in 2008 • New standard would encompass two parts: – Part A would be a new text standard (Authoring and Interchange) – Part B would be the updated talking book standard (Distribution) • A key goal was to separate text production from presentation – had been entwined in DTBook grammar – need for flexibility for internal production of print braille, large print and other formats
  • 53. > The Nuts and Bolts of Z39.98 • It’s a framework not a format – defines how to build markup grammars – enables consistency across implementations Image courtesy of Grant Cochrane / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  • 54. > Z39.98 Design Goals 1. Adaptability – Accommodate the needs of many producers – Allows for localizations – Choice of data complexity
  • 55. > Z39.98 Design Goals 2. Modularity – Plug-in architecture – Simplify building of new content models
  • 56. > Z39.98 Design Goals 3. Self-describing – Semantically rich data
  • 57. > Z39.98 Design Goals 4. Data-repurposing – Accommodate parallel publishing workflows EPU B Large Print Print Braille Z39.86 / DAISY 2.02
  • 58. > Abstract Document Model • Defines the structure without defining the content
  • 59. > Profiles and Features • Profiles are complete document models built using the abstract document model, adhering to the rules in Z39.98 • Features are self-contained models that can be plugged into profiles. MathML and SVG are examples, but any custom grammar can be defined.
  • 60. > Z39.98 Core Module Pool • Building blocks of a schema • Sections • Tables • Figures • Descriptions • Pagebreaks • Transitions • Notes • Annotations – Importing adds elements to the different layers http://www.daisy.org/z3998/2012/auth/cm/
  • 61. > Shared Semantics • Z39.98 Semantic Vocabulary – Semantics added via the role attribute
  • 62. > Pre-Defined Profiles • The working group defined three schemas as proof of concept and for immediate use: – Book – Newsfeed Aggregator – Generic Document http://www.daisy.org/z3998/2012/auth/profiles/
  • 63. > Pre-Defined Profiles • Automated documentation
  • 64. > Z39.98 In Use Today • DAISY Pipeline 2 Tool – Transformations for Z39.98 to EPUB 3, HTML and Braille (PEF)
  • 65. > Z39.98 In Use Today • DIAGRAM accessible description content model developed using the framework http://diagramcenter.org
  • 66. > Z39.98 In Use Today • CNIB has implemented the format internally for text production – Customized document model for ingesting file into Duxbury translation software – Generating DAISY 2.02 files for TTS • Swiss Library for Blind, Visually Impaired and Print Disabled have been working to create automated braille translation in DAISY Pipeline tool using liblouis
  • 67. > EPUB 3 Accessibility Text-to-Speech Media Overlays Web Techniques (HTML5/WCAG) ARIA Rich Navigation Metadata Structure and Semantics
  • 68. > EPUB 3 and DAISY DAISY EPUB 2 EPUB 3 Structure DTBook HTML4 or DTBook HTML5 Semantics N/A N/A epub:type Modalities SMIL text+audio N/A Media Overlays N/A N/A Video Navigation NCX/NCC NCX Navigation Document Interactivity N/A N/A Forms+Scripting+ARIA TTS N/A N/A SSML+PLS+CSS3 MathML Limited N/A Supported Styling/Layout CSS 2 CSS 2.1 CSS 2.1 + 3
  • 69. > Structure and Semantics• The DNA of your document: describes the data• Enables intelligent behaviours in reading systems• Facilitates access to content and simplifies navigation HTML5 improves the base vocabulary • section, aside, article, figure
  • 70. > epub:type attribute • Semantic Inflection – Make statements about your markup – EPUB 3 Structural Semantics Vocabulary http://idpf.org/epub/vocab/structure/
  • 71. > Logical Reading Order
  • 72. > MathML • Removes ambiguity of natural language descriptions • DAISY MathML Guidelines http://www.daisy.org/z3986/structure/SG-DAISY3/part2-math.html
  • 73. > SVG Raster Vector GIF / JPEG / PNG SVG http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG-access/
  • 74. > Audio / Video
  • 75. > Media Overlays  EPUB3 includes DAISY-style synchronization of text with pre- recorded audio  Full text / full audio  Partial text and audio  Structured audio  Bridges the gap between the audio book and the text-based ebook – lets the user choose their reading modality
  • 76. > EPUB Navigation Document
  • 77. > Web Standards • WCAG 2.0: – Perceivable – Operable – Understandable – Robust • WAI-ARIA - Roles, states and properties – Make forms and custom controls accessible
  • 78. > O’Reilly Books http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920025283.do http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920025283.do http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920024897.do
  • 79. > Accessibility Guidelines • Condensed information and examples • Includes content accessibility checklist • Work in progress… • DAISY developing reading system evaluation http://www.idpf.org/accessibility/guidelines
  • 80. > IDPF Accessibility Forum • Ask questions! http://idpf.org/forums/epub-accessibility • Forum is monitored
  • 81. > EPUB 3.0.1 Revision • New features up for discussion that can further improve accessibility: – Support for longdesc – Expanded structural semantics vocabulary – Semantic enrichment (RDFa and microdata)
  • 82. > Thank you! • Z39.98 Framework and Profiles http://www.daisy.org/z3998/2012/ • EPUB 3 Accessibility Guidelines http://idpf.org/accessibility/guidelines • IDPF Accessibility Forum http://idpf.org/forums/epub-accessibility Matt Garrish matt.garrish@cdata.biz Consultant
  • 83. hypothes.is/niso @dwhly
  • 84. All knowledge, annotated.
  • 85. 1013
  • 86. 2013
  • 87. 2023
  • 88. 3013
  • 89. Marc Andreessen
  • 90. hypothes.is/historicalprojects
  • 91. Why we don’t have this.• No peer-review model.• Not annotation based.• No way to link inside things.• No cold start strategy.• Not open, not interoperable.• Poor design.• Short term thinking.
  • 92. A non-profit project toenable communitymoderated annotation of theworld’s knowledge.
  • 93. An annotationaddress payload target
  • 94. target(specific payloadlocation)
  • 95. Digital annotations are addressable http://domain/path
  • 96. Open Annotation
  • 97. The Free Universal Construction Kit
  • 98. Now
  • 99. Coming SoonDocument ―A‖ Blog ―B‖
  • 100. Document ―A‖ Blog ―B‖
  • 101. Document ―A‖ Blog ―B‖
  • 102. Blog ―B‖17m 32s
  • 103. Blog ―B‖
  • 104. Selecting for quality Signal Meta-moderationVOLUME Voice Noise floor Obvious trolls Identity SpamSQUELCH Noise
  • 105. Solving for …• High volume• Personal > group > global contexts• Minor & major doc changes• Cross-format content (HTML & PDFs)• Combining anchored & unanchored• Extension vs embedded• Using the community to moderate the conversation• The cold start
  • 106. DEMO
  • 107. hypothes.is/alpha
  • 108. It should be where we are.
  • 109. Select some text.
  • 110. Contribute our thinking.
  • 111. Have a discussion.
  • 112. Link to it.
  • 113. Share it.
  • 114. Embed it.
  • 115. Survive (minor) changes. The quick brown fox juxps over the lazy dog.
  • 116. Survive (minor) changes. The quick brown fox juxps over the lazy dog.
  • 117. Survive (minor) changes. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • 118. Survive (minor) changes.away the cat will play. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. Jack and Jill ran up the prefix selection postfix
  • 119. Survive (minor) changes.away the cat will play. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. Jack and Jill ran up the prefix selection postfix https://github.com/hypothesis/h/wiki/fuzzy-anchoring
  • 120. Survive larger edits
  • 121. Survive larger edits
  • 122. Annotate anywhere, view everywhere URL URL / doi / hash HTML PDF
  • 123. Long term archival storage + ?
  • 124. Every Time You Say “eISBN”, AKitten Bleeds
  • 125. BISG Policy Statement
  • 126. 1 ISBN or Many? Pros and Cons
  • 127. 1 ISBN per format: Pros
  • 128. 1 ISBN per Format: Cons
  • 129. 1 ISBN-Many Formats: Pros
  • 130. 1 ISBN-Many Formats: Cons
  • 131. Takeaways
  • 132. Reality
  • 133. eISBN
  • 134. How Did This Even Happen?
  • 135. eISBN Is Not A Thing
  • 136. ISBNs is ISBNs
  • 137. Parts Is Parts
  • 138. Laura.Dawson@bowker.com
  • 139. The EPUB 3 Support Grid:Measuring Reading System ComplianceAngela BoleDeputy Executive DirectorBook Industry Study Group © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 140. About BISG Creating a more informed, empowered, and efficient book industry © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 141. Neutrality © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 142. BISG’s “Virtuous Circle” © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 143. Standards andEducation Best Practicesand Events Research © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 144. Removing Friction XBITS Metadata EDI EPUB RFID Content Structure © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 145. Removing Friction XBITS Metadata EDI EPUB RFID Content Structure © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 15
  • 146. Policy Statement ―The Book Industry Study Group (BISG) endorses EPUB 3 as the accepted and preferred standard for representing, packaging, and encoding structured and semantically enhanced Web content — including XHTML, CSS, SVG, images, and other resources — for distribution in a single-file format.‖ © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 147. Why EPUB 3? Sales by Format: Adult Fiction$1,600,000,000$1,400,000,000 eBooks$1,200,000,000$1,000,000,000 Hardcover $800,000,000 Mass-market $600,000,000 Paperback $400,000,000 Softcover $200,000,000 $0 2008 2009 2010 2011 © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 148. Why EPUB 3? Sales by Format: Adult Nonfiction$2,500,000,000$2,000,000,000 eBooks$1,500,000,000 Hardcover$1,000,000,000 Mass-market Paperback $500,000,000 Softcover $0 2008 2009 2010 2011 © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 149. Why EPUB 3? Sales by Format: Kids Books$1,800,000,000$1,600,000,000$1,400,000,000 eBooks$1,200,000,000$1,000,000,000 Hardcover $800,000,000 $600,000,000 Mass-market Paperback $400,000,000 Softcover $200,000,000 $0 2008 2009 2010 2011 © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 150. The EPUB 3 Support Grid © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 151. © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 152. Reading the Grid Reading Systems/Platforms Functionality EPUB 3 © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 153. Why the Grid?Slow Adoption of EPUB 3Non-ComplianceFractured Marketplace © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 154. Notes on the GridUpdated FrequentlySome info provided byvendors, some notBISG welcomes industryfeedback © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 155. Recent Updates to the Grid New Vendors: • CourseSmart • Inkling Updated Vendors • Safari Books Online • Google • Sony © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 16
  • 156. EPUB Functionality Navigation Elements • TOC Navigation • Page List Navigation • Landmarks Navigation • Custom Navigation Elements Metadata • Multiple title types • External metadata records (ONIX, MARC, etc.) © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 157. EPUB Functionality Pagination • Reflowable • Fixed Layout Text Content • XHTML • SVG • MathML • epub:switch • Preserves UTF-8/16 encoding © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 158. EPUB Functionality Linking • Embedded IDs • CFI • Linking inside the book • Linking outside the book Text Layout & Styling • Preservation of publisher provided styling and layout • Tables, numbered lists, bulleted lists, text on background images, floating elements, multi-column layout, headers/footers • Media queries © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 159. EPUB Functionality Global Language Support • Ruby positioning • CSS writing modes • Text direction • Page-direction-progression •Alternate style sheets Fonts • Embedded • Obfuscated embedded • Built in Unicode font support • Font descriptors © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 160. EPUB Functionality Multimedia • Audio • MP3 • AAC • Remote • Embedded • Video • H.264 • VP8 • Remote • Embedded • Media Overlays • Media Overlays highlight styling © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 161. EPUB FunctionalityOther Document Types Separate Device Features • PDF • Region Magnification • RTF • Pinch & Zoom • MS Word • Orientation lock Usability & Accessibility • Hide structural navigation levels • Device keyboard accessibility • User Interface controls exposed to and traversible by assistive technologies • Text content exposed to and traversible by assistive technologies © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 162. Reading Systems © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 163. Adobe Family CourseSmartADE 1.7.2 CourseSmart Online CourseSmart Android/IOSAmazon FamilyKindle e-ink Mobi7 GoogleKindle e-ink KF8 (Touch) Google E-Books, App and OnlineKindle Fire (KF8)Kindle IOS (Mobi7)Kindle Android (KF8) IDPFKindle Mac and PC (Mobi7) ReadiumApple FamilyApple iBooks App © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 164. Infogrid Pacific Nook FamilyAZARDI Desktop Nook iPad Reader (App)AZARDI Oline Nook Simple Touch (Device)AZARD WebApp Safari Books OnlineInkling Family Safari Books OnlineInkling Safari Books iOS/Android (Apps)Kobo Family Sony FamilyKobo iPad Reader (App) ReaderKobo Android Reader (App) Reader JapanKobo WiFi (Device) Reader Android AppKobo Touch, Glo, Mini (Device) Reader Android App (Japan)Kobo Arc (Device)Kobo Vox (Device) © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 165. VitalSource Family AppsAndroid OverDriveBrowser BlueFireiOSKindle Fire (Device)MacWindows © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 17
  • 166. Focus on “Multimedia” © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 167. Audio Adobe Amazon X No No No O O ? MP3 ? No No No No No No AAC Remote No No No No No No No Embedded X X X X X X XVideo X No No No O O ? H.264 ? No No No No ? ? VP8 Remote No No No No No No No Embedded X X X X X X XMedia Overlays No No No No No No NoMedia Overlays No No No No No No Nohighlight styling © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 168. Audio Apple CourseSmart Google IDPF N/A X X X X (system dependent) MP3 N/A Browser No X X dependent (system dependent) AAC Remote X X X No X Embedded X X X X XVideo N/A Browser X X X dependent (system dependent) H.264 N/A Browser X X X dependent (system dependent) VP8 Remote X X X No X Embedded N/A X X X XMedia Overlays ? No No X X***Media Overlays ? No No X Nohighlight styling © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 169. Audio Nook Safari Books Sony ? N/A X No No No X No MP3 ? N/A No No No No X No AAC Remote ? N/A No No No No No No Embedded ? N/A No No No No X NoVideo ? N/A No No N/A N/A X No H.264 ? N/A No No N/A N/A No No VP8 Remote ? N/A X No No No No No Embedded X ? X No No No X NoMedia Overlays ? ? No No No No X NoMedia Overlays X ? No No No No X Nohighlight styling © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 170. Audio VitalSource Overdrive BlueFire X X X X X X ? No MP3 X X X X X X ? No AAC Remote X X X X X X ? No Embedded X X X X X X NoVideo IE9 X X X X X N/A H.264 only IE9 No Varies No No No ? N/A VP8 only Remote X X X X X X ? No Embedded X X X X X X ? NoMedia Overlays No No No No No No ? NoMedia Overlays No No No No No No ? Nohighlight styling © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 171. Conclusion Competing content delivery systems and non- compliance create friction in the marketplace BISG’s EPUB 3 Grid provides needed information to content creators The EPUB 3 Support Grid is continually updated to account for a shifting marketplace © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 172. Thanks for listening! Angela Bole angela@bisg.org 646-336-7141 x11 © 2013, the Book Industry Study Group, Inc. 18
  • 173. Kansas Statewide eBookConsortium: Lessons Learned JO BUDLER STATE LIBRARIAN NISO VIRTUAL CONFERENCE APRIL 17, 2013 www.kslib.info
  • 174. Agenda Brief history of the Kansas eBook Consortium including its purpose Lessons learned What we would have done differently had we known then what we know now! www.kslib.info
  • 175. Kansas eBook Consortium State Library of Kansas is committed to ever improving library service to Kansas residents Provide reading material to all Assist librarians in bringing newest technologies to their patrons Downloadable eBooks expand the number of titles available to the blind community of readers. www.kslib.info
  • 176. Kansas eBook Consortium Started in Dec. 2005 OverDrive provided platform & content Included downloadable eBooks (print and audio), music and video All inclusive (school, public, academic and special libraries) serving all Kansas residents. www.kslib.info
  • 177. Who is served? Population: 2.7 million Diverse service area (some urban, mostly rural) Access included ALL libraries  Public libraries = 329  33 of the 329 serve populations over 10,000  5 serve populations over 100,000  School = approximately 1000  Academic  Two Year Institutions = 26  Regents Institutions = 7  Private Institutions = 22 www.kslib.info
  • 178. State Library of Kansas Provided funding for the platform ($10,800)  Continue to do so for all three providers now. Provided funding for much of the content  Continues; all Freading tokens are funded by SLK Contracted for this service through BCR (OCLC network in Colorado)  Now SLK manages this service itself Renewed the 2 year contract on an on-going basis  New contracts renew annually www.kslib.info
  • 179. Changes in 2010 www.kslib.info
  • 180. Changes that occurred in 2010 March 2010: new State Librarian of Kansas Summer 2010: new pricing and contract from OverDrive  Platform fees were raised to $75,000  Contract language changed to remove ownership of purchased material www.kslib.info
  • 181. More changes Dec. 5, 2011: SLK ended downloadable eBook service contract with OverDrive In Dec. 2011, promoted  Internet Archives/Open Library  Gutenberg titles Jan. 2012, SLK continues to offer downloadable eBook service through  One Click (Recorded Books)  3M www.kslib.info
  • 182. ..and more Partnership with CALIFA (Summer 2012)  Utilizes Adobe eBook Platform Other providers added later  Freading (January 2013)  Baker and Taylor (November 2012) www.kslib.info
  • 183. What did not change Commitment to the users of this service Communication increased  With the librarians  Through libraries to end-users  Through the media  LJ  Local newspapers  TV stations  Radio stations www.kslib.info
  • 184. Lessons learned1. If you plan on being inclusive, do so from the verybeginning.  Serving all Kansans = all libraries www.kslib.info
  • 185. Lesson2. Ownership vs. Leasing  Know your contract  Access trumps all  Content  Holds  Functionality www.kslib.info
  • 186. More lessons3. Collection Development  Someone needs to monitor  Holds: Ideally there are no more than 5 holds on a title  Relationship with librarians  Recommendations  Funding (to get new titles and more copies to reduce holds) • “Recommended level of contribution”***  Relationship with end users  Recommendations  Some want to give donations *** www.kslib.info
  • 187. And more lessons4. Customer satisfaction  Help with devices  Download questions/help  Functionality of the various platforms  If it is not going to lead to a good experience for the customer, don’t promote it. www.kslib.info
  • 188. What would we have done differently?1. Have libraries commit to contributing set amountsfrom the beginning  “Fair share”  Easier than imposing contribution model later2. Collection Development team  Established from the beginning of project  Feeds into the willingness to contribute www.kslib.info
  • 189. What would we have done differently?3. Training component at the State Library ratherthan help desk  Training modules  Self-help sheets  Teach individual librarians to help end-users4. One platform  There was not a lot of time nor were there many vendors to test drive or evaluate when we made our cut-off  Publishers are offering content (or not) on all platforms  Multiple platform costs mean less $$ for content www.kslib.info
  • 190. Ideally Adobe eBook Platform with Discovery software in place  Ease of check-out  Kansas Library Card = number and birthdate  Include self-publishing  Commercial publishers are so fearful  eBook readers are willing to try “non-mainstream” writers … perhaps all readers are!  Multi-state consortium  Or at least ILL capability across consortia www.kslib.info
  • 191. Contact info Jo Budler State Librarian State Library of Kansas Statehouse, Room 312-N300 SW 10th Street Topeka, KS 66612 jo.budler@library.ks.gov 785-296-5466 www.kslib.info
  • 192. EPUB 3 Digital RightsManagementJim Doveyjdovey@kobo.com
  • 193. "DRM is not a selling point. There’s noone who’s ever bought a book becauseit had DRM." —Cory Doctorow
  • 194. Digital Rights Management• Ideological wars• RMS’ ―Digital Restrictions Management‖• Hackers & Crackers• Insert your preferred [trollface.gif] here Let’s avoid all that…
  • 195. Current DRM Systems• Adobe Content Server / Digital Editions• Amazon Kindle DRM• Barnes & Noble Pass-Hash• Apple FairPlay• Kobo KDRM
  • 196. Current DRM Systems• Adobe Content Server / Digital Editions• Amazon Kindle DRM• Barnes & Noble Pass-Hash• Apple FairPlay• Kobo KDRM
  • 197. Adobe Content Server• Widespread use today• EPUB 2 compliant• EPUB 3 maybe possibly perhaps soon- ish • Don’t bank on it
  • 198. DRM Technology
  • 199. Enabling end users
  • 200. Four Components• User Authentication• Device (Reading System) Authentication• Content Authentication• Action Authorization
  • 201. Two Components• User Authentication• Device (Reading System) Authentication• Content Authentication• Action Authorization
  • 202. • Guaranteed identity Authentication • Absolute requirement for any rights management• Identifying a user — are they a purchaser? • The Prime Aim: guaranteed compensation • Secondary Aim: identifying Bad Actors • Watermarking• Identifying a Reading System or Device • Only to lock down actions of a particular purchaser
  • 203. Authorization• Action-by-action • ―Read content‖ is an authorized action • ―Excerpt‖, ―Share‖, etc. • ―Re-download‖ is an important one• Lending
  • 204. Authorization• Action-by-action • ―Read content‖ is an authorized action • ―Excerpt‖, ―Share‖, etc. • ―Re-download‖ is an important one• Lending
  • 205. Libraries• Loan out content • Specific time-frames • Differing authentication requirements? • Library-approved devices • Library account authentication Should never need a different SKU/ISBN/ePub
  • 206. Denying Authorization• Encrypted content• Decrypt only upon successful authentication and/or authorization
  • 207. Identities• Four things to identify: • The consumer, i.e. the person reading now • The purchaser • The reading system • The content
  • 208. Watermarking• Four things to identify: • The consumer, i.e. the person reading now • The purchaser • The reading system • The content
  • 209. Lightweight Content Protection• Four things to identify: • The consumer, i.e. the person reading now • The purchaser • The reading system • The content
  • 210. Strong DRM• Four things to identify: • The consumer, i.e. the person reading now • The purchaser • The reading system • The content
  • 211. EPUB 3 Support• EPUB 3 defines some things • Encryption metadata format • Digital Signature metadata format • Some things used by Adobe: rights.xml
  • 212. Readium• Started as a web-based reference implementation of EPUB 3 via Chrome browser• Now an open source foundation with many projects
  • 213. Readium SDK• A commercially-viable native EPUB 3 implementation • Similar in scope to Adobe RMSDK • Implemented by who’s-who of EPUB industry: • IDPF, Kobo, Bluefire, DAISY, Sony…
  • 214. Readium LCP• A specification for Lightweight Content Protection• Designed for both commercial sales and lending • Lending supported for libraries or individuals, configurable per-book
  • 215. Readium LCP• Draft proposal available online • https://dl.dropbox.com/u/896638/Kob o-EPUB-LCP.pdf• Details will change, aims/capabilities will not• Should begin work in earnest mid-2013 • Completion Q4 2013
  • 216. Readium LCP• Input from libraries much appreciated • The primary features of Readium LCP are geared towards your use cases • We need to know if we’ve missed any!• Please contact the Readium Foundation: http://readium.org
  • 217. EPUB 3 Digital RightsManagementJim Doveyjdovey@kobo.com
  • 218. The future of EPUB 3EPUB 3 and the future of interoperable ebooks: what libraries need to know April 17, 2013 George Kerscher <kerscher@montana.com>
  • 219. http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920024897.do#
  • 220. Growing Industry Support for EPUB 3 … soon in a vendor directory at idpf.org
  • 221. EPUB 3 Reading System Test Suite• Objective, repeatable RS tests that anyone can run, anywhere• Accumulation of results for ―can-I-use‖ type information• Hopefully, also a trigger for (some) RS vendors to “speed up”…• Next steps: additions, refinements, clarifications…• … and the web site for accumulated results Contributions welcome! https://github.com/mgylling/epub-testsuite
  • 222. and oh, in the meanwhile…• Formatting EPUB 3 content to be EPUB 2 Reading System compatible• Key aspect of recent O’Reilly launch http://toc.oreilly.com/2013/02/oreillys-journey-to-epub-3.html• All EPUB 2 fallback generation can be automated• Consolidated info on upcoming EPUB information site
  • 223. Borrowed from http://toc.oreilly.com/2013/02/oreillys-journey-to-epub-3.html
  • 224. II. Projects 2013 and forward
  • 225. Collaboration with major standards bodies• EPUB 3.0.1 • Minor revision focusing on spec bugs and reference updates • Fixed Layout EPUB (FXL) slated to become normative part of 3.0.1• ISO/IEC DTS 30135-1 (JTC - SC34, TC46, TC100/TA10) • Ballot currently ongoing • Outcome intended to be identical to EPUB 3.0.1• W3C • February workshop in NYC • Expected short term outcomes: W3C interest groups on digital publishing (CSS Adaptive Layout, metadata, etc) • Expected longer term outcomes: further harmonization with OWP
  • 226. 2013-15: segment focus on educationKey focus areas (initial set) • LMS Integration, APIs (LTI et al) • Interactive materials • ―Standard widget library‖ • Advanced content (non-interactive) • MathML • Chemistry, electronics, et al • Infographics • Annotations • Accessibility of all of the above • http://idpf.org/accessibility/guidelines/ under development
  • 227. Modular Development: 2013• Indexes• Dictionaries and Glossaries• Annotations• Standard Widget Library• Advanced Hybrid Layouts
  • 228. EPUB IndexesEbook indexes: human-crafted tools for guided content discovery Better navigation Index expand/collapse Access index group Pop-up contextual information New features Range highlighting Interactive generic cross-references Index filtering http://idpf.org/ongoing
  • 229. EPUB Dictionaries & Glossaries (PD Q2 2013)• Typical “system-level” dictionary not sufficient • Children and levels of reading/understanding • Language learning • Specialized fields (law, medicine, etc.)• Glossaries, Dictionaries, Bilingual Dictionaries, Thesauri: publisher opportunities1. Read “as any other book”2. Integrate as a lookup service3. Semantics allowing accessibility and usability http://idpf.org/ongoing
  • 230. Standard Widget LibraryGoal: ―templates‖ for interactive HTML5/EPUB objects: no coding required • Sufficiently simple to integrate • Sufficiently customizable/skinnable • Fully accessible • Open source: developed and shared by the communityProject not yet started - suggestions on scope and approaches welcomed!
  • 231. EPUB Advanced Hybrid Layouts (PD Q3 2013) Imagine an EPUB that contains multiple renditions… The Advanced Hybrid Layout (AHL) spec will enable: 1. Rendition Selection Select the rendition that best matches current context/preferences 2. Inter-rendition mapping Enable the user to move between renditions without loosing current reading position 3. Sub-page region mapping and navigation For comics and other graphically rich publication types http://idpf.org/ongoing
  • 232. Readium – where next?• Project run during 2012 – reference implementation of EPUB 3 RS• Widely used in QA processes• Live cloud-based deployment by Benetech since February this year• This year: Readium Foundation • continued support of ―readium-web‖, and • parallel ―readium-sdk‖ effort • Lower-level, high-performance components • Native code on multiple platforms http://readium.org/
  • 233. Thank you!• IDPF needs your help and input on… • Reading System test suite • Standard widget library • Current and future specifications • Best practices and tutorials…• All current activities at http://idpf.org/ongoingContact kerscher@montana.com
  • 234. NISO WebinarConnecting the Dots: Constellations in theLinked Data UniverseQuestions?All questions will be posted with presenter answers onthe NISO website following the webinar:http://www.niso.org/news/events/2013/virtual/epub3 NISO Virtual Conference • April 17, 2013
  • 235. THANK YOU Thank you for joining us today.Please take a moment to fill out the brief online survey. We look forward to hearing from you!