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New Forms of Discovery and Purchasing in Libraries: Demand Driven Acquisitions

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New Forms of Discovery and Purchasing in Libraries: Demand Driven Acquisitions …

New Forms of Discovery and Purchasing in Libraries: Demand Driven Acquisitions
June 27, 2014 - 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
8th Annual NISO/BISG Forum: The Changing Standards Landscape: Managing an Increasingly Complex and Interconnected World of Content
Michael Levine-Clark
Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Collections Services, University of Denver

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  • 1. New Forms of Discovery and Purchasing in Libraries: Demand Driven Acquisitions NISO/BISG 8th Annual Forum Las Vegas June 27, 2014 Michael Levine-Clark Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Collections Services University of Denver
  • 2. http://www.niso.org/publications/rp/rp-20-2014
  • 3. Goals • Develop a flexible model for DDA that works for publishers, vendors, aggregators, and libraries. • Model should allow for DDA programs that – Meet local budget and collection needs – Allow for consortial participation – Support cross-aggregator implementation – Account for how DDA impacts all functional areas of the library
  • 4. RECOMMENDATIONS
  • 5. 1. Establishing Goals • Four Broad Goals for DDA – Saving Money – Spending The Same Amount of Money More Wisely – Providing Broader Access – Building a Permanent Collection via Patron Input
  • 6. Saving Money • Providing access to fewer books • Emphasizing temporary access (STLs) over perpetual access (purchasing) • In evidence-based programs, having a higher usage threshold prior to purchase
  • 7. Spending Same Amount More Wisely • Larger pool of titles, emphasis on temporary access • Smaller pool of titles, emphasis on perpetual access
  • 8. Providing Broader Access • Most expansive pool possible • Emphasizing STLs over perpetual access • In evidence-based programs, having a higher usage threshold prior to purchase
  • 9. Building a Permanent Collection via Patron Input • Having a tightly-focused profile/smaller consideration pool • Emphasizing perpetual access over STLs • In evidence-based programs, having a lower usage threshold prior to purchase
  • 10. 2. Choosing Content to Make Available • Important Issues – Not all p-books available as e-books – No single supplier provides all e-books – Not all e-books available via DDA or under same models • Therefore – More comprehensive coverage requires more suppliers and more models – Broadest coverage possible = include print – Approval vendors can help manage DDA across multiple suppliers • Publishers should recognize that libraries may wish to limit number of suppliers, and plan accordingly
  • 11. 3. Choosing DDA Models Mix of auto-purchase and STL based on goals of program • Auto-Purchase – Purchase triggered on the first use longer than free browse – Purchase triggered after set number of uses – Purchase triggered after set number of STLs • STL – A set number of STLs prior to auto-purchase – Only STLs, with no auto-purchase
  • 12. 3. Choosing DDA Models • Evidence-based acquisition – Sometimes only option based on platform capabilities – Library and publisher should develop expectations based on analysis of past usage • Publishers may wish to participate in some or all models. • Some concern by publishers about sustainability of STL
  • 13. 4. Profiling • DDA profiles should be based on the broadest definitions possible within these areas, and relative to goals of the program – Subject coverage should provide access to a wide range of content, even in subjects that may not be core – Retrospective coverage for critical mass • Especially in programs that otherwise limit coverage • May or may not overlap with print holdings, depending on library preference
  • 14. 5. Loading Records • Libraries should – Load records regularly and as soon after receipt as possible – Load records into as many discovery tools as possible – Code records for easy suppression or removal – Enrich metadata to increase discoverability – Load point-of-purchase records after purchase to ease acquisitions workflow/payment
  • 15. 6. Removing Content • Libraries should: – Remove records from all discovery tools as soon as feasible, often using supplier’s delete file – Establish regular cycle for removal – Maintain a record of titles removed for assessment
  • 16. 7. Assessment • There are multiple reasons for assessment, so this should be planned from the start – Measuring overall effectiveness of the program – Measuring success at cost reduction – Measuring usage – Predicting future spending – Managing the consideration pool • Data sources might include – COUNTER reports – Vendor/publisher supplied reports – ILS or other local data
  • 17. 8. Preservation Libraries and publishers should work together to ensure that un-owned content remains available, perhaps in partnership with third- party solutions such as LOCKSS and Portico.
  • 18. 9. Consortial DDA • Three basic models – Multiplier (a multiple of list price allows shared ownership) – Limited Use (shared ownership, but with a cap on use before a second copy purchased) – Buying Club (shared access to consideration pool, but individual ownership)
  • 19. 10. Public Library DDA • Mediated • Wish lists • Often not through the catalog
  • 20. Recommended Practice Presentation will be on Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/MichaelLevineClark Recommended Practice: http://www.niso.org/publications/rp/rp-20-2014 Survey results: http://www.niso.org/apps/group_public/download. php/12541/DDA_Survey_Results.pdf
  • 21. Thank You Michael Levine-Clark michael.levine-clark@du.edu