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NISO/NASIG Joint Webinar:
Playing the Numbers:
Best Practices in Acquiring, Interpreting and
Applying Usage Statistics
May...
Release 4 of the COUNTER
Code of Practice for e-
Resources and new usage-
based measures of impact
Peter Shepherd
COUNTER
...
COUNTER Release 4
- objectives
 A single, unified Code covering all e-resources,
including journals, databases, books, re...
Release 4: main features
 A single, integrated Code of Practice covering
journals, databases, books, reference works
and ...
Release 4: main features
 A requirement that Institutional Identifiers, Journal DOI
and Book DOI be included in the usage...
Release 4: main features
 Modified Database Reports, in which the previous requirement to report
Session counts has been ...
Release 4: Standard Usage
Reports
 Journal Report 1: Number of Successful Full-Text Article Requests by Month and
Journal...
Release 4: recording and reporting
usage on mobile devices
 The following optional additional reports enable usage on mob...
Release 4: timetable for
implementation
 Deadline date for implementation of Release 4:
31 December 2013
-after this date...
Full details of Release 4 will be found on the
COUNTER website at:
http://www.projectcounter.org/code_practice.html
COUNTE...
New COUNTER usage-based
measures of impact
Advantages:
 Usage can be reported at the individual item and individual resea...
COUNTER Code of Practice for
Articles
COUNTER Articles covers the following areas:
 article types to be counted;
 articl...
Usage Factor: aims and outcomes
The overall aim of the Usage Factor project was to explore how online journal usage
statis...
Who will benefit from the Usage
Factor?
Four major groups will benefit from the introduction of Usage Factors:
 Authors, ...
Usage Factor: Journals
- the calculation
Publishers will be able to generate Usage Factors using the Code of Practice, but...
COUNTER Articles and Usage
Factor - implementation
 Step 1: implement COUNTER Code of Practice
for Articles
 Step 2: Col...
Integrating COUNTER Statistics within the
Information Workflow
Oliver Pesch
Chief Product Strategist
EBSCO Information Ser...
Gathering usage is just the first
step…
and usage is just one piece of
the puzzle.
Effective collection analysis involves
combining usage with other data for a
more complete picture
and presenting that inf...
Examples of usage in the workflow
(presenting usage in context)
Subscription renewals
Subscription renewals
Subscription renewals
Instant access to cost-
per-use and holdings
data streamlines the
renewal process.
Individual Titles
Individual Titles
Detailed analysis,
holdings and usage
available for individual
orders.
Publisher packages
Publisher packages Package-level totals
presented
Publisher packages
Quick charts to see the
“health” of the package.
Publisher Packages
Publisher Packages
Usage and cost-per-use
in package details
facilitates decisions on
“swaps” and “drops”.
Usage vs other metrics
Usage: The Key Metric
% of librarians indicating a metric as very important when making
content decisions
Source: EBSCO, 2...
We asked librarians how they use
usage statistics:
98% for cancellation and/or renewal
decisions
72% for journal package n...
Including other metric types
Including other metric types
This library has included
Impact Factor and
Eigenfactor scores.
Decisions and challenges related to usage
and collection analysis
Usage from all platforms vs publisher platform
Usage from all platforms vs publisher platform
This reports provides
analysis for the
publisher platform and
all platforms...
Subscriptions to “Combinations”
We have a single order
that is for two titles.
Subscriptions to “Combinations”
The order is mapped to
both titles in holdings
Subscriptions to “Combinations”
Usage for this “order”
accumulates usage
from both titles so cost-
per-use is meaningful.
Mapping the data and analyzing
packages…
Putting it all together: the basics
The goal
A report showing subscribed
titles with their cost, use and
cost-per-use.
Putting it all together: the basics
Usage Cost
Putting it all together: the basics
Usage Cost
How do you
connect usage
to cost? ISSN?
Putting it all together: the basics
Usage Cost
How do you
connect usage
to cost? ISSN?
Challenges with ISSN
matching
- Wro...
Putting it all together: packages
Usage Cost
The goal
Create a package analysis
with package-level summary.
Putting it all together: packages
Usage Cost
How do you
know what is
included in the
package?
Challenges
Analyzing the pac...
Putting it all together: packages
Usage Cost
How do you
know what is
included in the
package?Solution
Incorporate detailed...
Putting it all together: other data
Usage CostHoldings Other
The goal
Add impact factors and other
key-decision data to th...
Putting it all together: other data
Usage Cost
How do you
connect the other
data? ISSN?
Holdings Other
Putting it all together: other data
Usage Cost
How do you
connect the other
data? ISSN?
Holdings Other
Inclusion of impact...
Putting it all together
Usage CostHoldings Other
The goal
Make this process
repeatable and as simple as
possible.
Putting it all together
Usage CostHoldings Other
What technology can
do all this?
Putting it all together
Usage CostHoldings Other
What technology can
do all this?
Some options
• Excel
• MS Access or simi...
Summary
• Usage is a means to an end
• Usage needs to be combined with other data to be truly
effective
• Providing usage ...
Thank you
opesch@ebsco.com
Usage in the
Eye of the
Beholder:
Developing Academic
Library Usage Reports
that Meet the Needs of
Your Institution
Jill E...
Usage is Contextual
Determine the audience
 Different
audiences
require different
data
 Understand
level of detail
sought
LSE, Audience in t...
What is to Be Answered?
 Knowing the
outcomes
sought upfront,
saves time with
data gathering
 Review
outcomes with
veste...
Less is More
 Curtail data
 Customize level
of detail
 Be as concise as
possible OSU Special Collections & Archives: Cr...
Gathering Stats
 Sushi
 Set ingest for
right reports
 Next Gen ILS
management
JR1 & JR1a
 JR1-standard
 JR1a-optional
 Dedupe between
the two
LSE, Statistics Machine Room, 1964
Book Reports
 Growing
demand
 BR1-standard
 BR2-standard
Multi-Media Reports
 New with
Counter 4 stats
 Advocate for
providers to
become
compliant
U.S. National Archives: Nitrat...
Gold Open Access
 Another new
report with
Counter 4
 standard report
 Can be used in
price
negotiation
Typical Report Requests
 Academic: ACRL,
ARL, State-wide
 Accreditation
 Annual
 Purchasing
 Collection Decision
Academic Reports
 High level
 Gross numbers
 Little detail
Annual & Accreditation
 High level
 Multi-year
comparisons
 More detail
Purchasing Reports
 More granular
detail
 May be multi-
year
 May need to
adjust more
often
Field Museum, Page 74 of Ac...
Collection Decision
Reports
 Most detailed
 Look at use and
qualitative
factors
 Multi-year
Report Structure
 Remember
audience
 Questions to be
answered
 Level of detail
needed
NASA, Differential Analyzer
Graphs/Pie Charts
 Use for annual
reports
 Accreditation
reports
 Purchasing
reports
Administrative
 Keep to a page
or short slide
deck (5 slides)
 Use graphs/pie
charts to convey
salient
information
Smith...
Purchasing Reports
 Combination of
graphs/charts &
spreadsheets
 Longer to
provide greater
detail
Collection Decision
Reports
 Almost always
spreadsheets
 Simplified from
COUNTER
reports
 Contextual
detail California ...
Thank you!
Jill Emery
Collection
Development
Librarian
Portland State
University
jemery@pdx.edu
NISO/NASIG Joint Webinar • May 21, 2014
Questions?
All questions will be posted with presenter answers on
the NISO website...
Thank you for joining us today.
Please take a moment to fill out the brief online survey.
We look forward to hearing from ...
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May 21 NISO/NASIG Webinar: Playing the Numbers: Best Practices in Acquiring, Interpreting and Applying Usage Statistics

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About the Webinar

In a time of shrinking budgets and growing reliance on electronic resources, the collection and analysis of usage statistics has become a staple of the library world. But while usage statistics may be ubiquitous, many librarians still struggle with the best methods of interpreting the data. The ability to effectively understand and apply usage data is an important skill for librarians to master as they attempt to analyze their collections and justify their expenses to administrations.

This webinar will highlight the ins and outs of COUNTER, as well as discuss the process of analyzing the data once harvested.Introductions

Agenda

Todd Carpenter, Executive Director, NISO

Todd Enoch, Head, Serials and Electronic Resources, University of North Texas Libraries;
Chair of the Continuing Education Committee, NASIG

* * * * * * *

COUNTER Update: Release 4 of the COUNTER Code of Practice for e-Resources
Peter Shepherd, Project Director, COUNTER

Integrating COUNTER Statistics within the Information Workflow
Oliver Pesch, Chief Product Strategist and Senior Vice President, EBSCO Information Services


Usage in the Eye of the Beholder: Developing Academic Library Usage Reports that Meet the Needs of Your Institution
Jill Emery, Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University Library

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Transcript of "May 21 NISO/NASIG Webinar: Playing the Numbers: Best Practices in Acquiring, Interpreting and Applying Usage Statistics"

  1. 1. NISO/NASIG Joint Webinar: Playing the Numbers: Best Practices in Acquiring, Interpreting and Applying Usage Statistics May 21, 2014 Speakers: Peter Shepherd, Project Director, COUNTER Oliver Pesch, Chief Product Strategist and Senior Vice President, EBSCO Information Services Jill Emery, Collection Development Librarian, Portland State University Library http://www.niso.org/news/events/2014/nasig/
  2. 2. Release 4 of the COUNTER Code of Practice for e- Resources and new usage- based measures of impact Peter Shepherd COUNTER May 2014
  3. 3. COUNTER Release 4 - objectives  A single, unified Code covering all e-resources, including journals, databases, books, reference works, multimedia content, etc.  Improve the database reports  Improve the reporting of archive usage  Enable the reporting of mobile usage separately  Expand the categories of ‘Access Denied’ covered  Improve the application of XML and SUSHI in the design of the usage reports  Collect metadata that facilitates the linking of usage statistics to other datasets, such as subscription information
  4. 4. Release 4: main features  A single, integrated Code of Practice covering journals, databases, books, reference works and multimedia content  An expanded list of Definitions, including terms such as ‘Gold Open Access’, ‘Multimedia Full Content Unit’, ‘Record View’, ‘Result Click’, as well as different categories of ‘Access Denied’, etc. that are used for the first time in Release 4  Enhancements of the SUSHI (Standardised Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative) protocol designed to facilitate its implementation by vendors and its use by librarians
  5. 5. Release 4: main features  A requirement that Institutional Identifiers, Journal DOI and Book DOI be included in the usage reports, to facilitate not only the management of usage data, but also the linking of usage data to other data relevant to collections of online content.  A requirement that usage of Gold Open Access articles within journals be reported separately in a new report: Journal Report 1 GOA: Number of Successful Gold Open Access Full-text Article Requests by Month and Journal.  A requirement that Journal Report 5 must be provided
  6. 6. Release 4: main features  Modified Database Reports, in which the previous requirement to report Session counts has been dropped, and new requirements, to report Record Views and Result Clicks, have been added. (Database Report 3 has also been renamed Platform Report 1).  A new report, Multimedia Report 1, which covers the usage of non- textual multimedia resources, such as audio, video and images, by reporting the number of successful requests for multimedia full content units  New optional reports covering usage on mobile devices  A description of the relative advantages of logfiles and page tags as the basis for counting online usage  Flexibility in the usage reporting period that allows customers to specify a date range for their usage reports
  7. 7. Release 4: Standard Usage Reports  Journal Report 1: Number of Successful Full-Text Article Requests by Month and Journal  Journal Report 1 GOA: Number of Successful Gold Open Access Full-Text Article Requests by Month and Journal  Journal Report 2: Access Denied to Full-Text Articles by Month, Journal and Category  Journal Report 5: Number of Successful Full-Text Article Requests by Year-of- Publication (YOP) and Journal  Database Report 1: Total Searches, Result Clicks and Record Views by Month and Database  Database Report 2: Access Denied by Month, Database and Category  Platform Report 1: Total Searches, Result Clicks and Record Views by Month and Platform  Book Report 1: Number of Successful Requests by Month and Title  Book Report 2: Number of Successful Section Requests by Month and Title  Book Report 3: Access Denied to Content Items by Month, Title and Category  Book Report 4: Access Denied to Content Items by Month, Platform and Category  Book Report 5: Total Searches by Month and Title  Multimedia Report 1: Number of Successful Full Multimedia Content Units Requests by Month and Collection
  8. 8. Release 4: recording and reporting usage on mobile devices  The following optional additional reports enable usage on mobile devices to be reported separately:  Journal Report 3 Mobile: Number of Successful Item Requests by Month, Journal and Page Type for usage on a Mobile Device  Title Report 1 Mobile: Number of Successful Requests for Journal Full-text Articles and Book Sections by Month and Title ( formatted for normal browsers/delivered to mobile devices AND formatted for mobile devices/delivered to mobile devices)  Title Report 3 Mobile: Number of Successful Requests by Month, Title and Page Type (formatted for normal browsers/delivered to mobile devices AND formatted for mobile devices/delivered to mobile devices) COUNTER will recognize as usage on a mobile device, which may be reported in the above reports, any usage that meets one of the following criteria:  useragents that are included in the WURFL list. WURFL is the Wireless Universal Resource FiLe, a database containing the profile of mobile devices; this database may be found at: http://wurfl.sourceforge.net/  usage via a proprietary mobile App provided by the publisher/content provider
  9. 9. Release 4: timetable for implementation  Deadline date for implementation of Release 4: 31 December 2013 -after this date only vendors compliant with Release 4 are COUNTER compliant  Over 100 Publishers/Vendors are now providing Release 4 Usage Reports
  10. 10. Full details of Release 4 will be found on the COUNTER website at: http://www.projectcounter.org/code_practice.html COUNTER Code of Practice -Release 4
  11. 11. New COUNTER usage-based measures of impact Advantages:  Usage can be reported at the individual item and individual researcher level  Usage is more ’immediate’ than citations  Usage potentially covers all categories of online publication  COUNTER usage statistics are independently audited and generally trusted Two new COUNTER Codes of Practice have been launched: COUNTER Code of Practice for Articles (COUNTER Articles)  Recording, consolidation and reporting of usage at the individual article level  Standard applies to publishers, aggregators and repositories COUNTER Code of Practice for Usage Factor  Usage-based measure of impact of journals, institutions and individual scholars  The Usage Factor for a Journal is the Median Value in a set of ordered full-text article usage data ( i.e. the number of successful full text article requests) for a specified Usage Period of articles published in a journal during a specified Publication Period. COUNTER Articles and Usage Factor are both based on the recording and consolidation of COUNTER-compliant usage data at the individual article level
  12. 12. COUNTER Code of Practice for Articles COUNTER Articles covers the following areas:  article types to be counted;  article versions to be counted;  data elements to be measured;  definitions of these data elements;  content and format of usage reports;  requirements for data collection and data processing;  requirements for independent audit (under development); Release 1 of the COUNTER Code of Practice for Articles is available on the COUNTER website at: http://www.projectcounter.org/counterarticles.html
  13. 13. Usage Factor: aims and outcomes The overall aim of the Usage Factor project was to explore how online journal usage statistics might form the basis of a new measure of journal impact and quality, the Usage Factor for journals. Specific objectives were to answer the following questions:  Will Usage Factor be a statistically meaningful measure?  Will Usage Factor be accepted by researchers, publishers, librarians and research institutions?  Will Usage Factor be statistically credible and robust?  Is there an organizational and economic model for its implementation that would cost-effective and be acceptable to the major stakeholder groups. Following extensive testing using usage data for over 200 journals from a range of publishers the main outcome of the project has been the new COUNTER Code of Practice for Usage Factors. This new Code of Practice uses the article level usage data collected using the COUNTER Code of Practice for Articles as the basis for the calculation of the Usage Factor. The COUNTER Code of Practice for Usage Factors is available on the COUNTER website at: http://www.projectcounter.org/usage_factor.html
  14. 14. Who will benefit from the Usage Factor? Four major groups will benefit from the introduction of Usage Factors:  Authors, especially those in practitioner-oriented fields, where citation- based measures understate the impact of journals, as well as those in areas outside the core STM fields of pure research, where coverage of journals by citation-based measures is weak.  Publishers, especially those with large numbers of journals outside of the core STM research areas, where there is no reliable, universal measure of journal impact, because citation-based measures are either inadequate or non-existent for these fields  Librarians, when deciding on new journal acquisitions, have no reliable, global measures of journal impact for fields outside the core STM research fields. They would use usage-based measures to help them prioritise journals to be added to their collections.  Research Funding Agencies, who are seeking a wider range of credible, consistent quantitative measures of the value and impact of the outputs of the research that they fund.
  15. 15. Usage Factor: Journals - the calculation Publishers will be able to generate Usage Factors using the Code of Practice, but will have to be independently audited for their Usage Factors to be listed in the Usage Factor Central Registry. Two categories of Usage Factor may be calculated  The 24 month Journal Usage Factor 2010/2011: all content The median number of successful requests during 2010/2011 to content published in the journal in 2010/2011  The Journal Usage Factor 2010/2011: full-text articles only The median number of successful requests during 2010/2011 to full-text articles published in the journal in 2010/2011  Note: 1.The article-level data collected in COUNTER Article Report 1 will be used as the basis for the Usage Factor calculation 2. Usage Factors will be reported annually, for 2010/2011, 2011/2012, etc.
  16. 16. COUNTER Articles and Usage Factor - implementation  Step 1: implement COUNTER Code of Practice for Articles  Step 2: Collect article-level usage data for 2014/2015  Step 3: Calculate and report Usage Factors using protocols specified in Code of Practice for Usage Factors
  17. 17. Integrating COUNTER Statistics within the Information Workflow Oliver Pesch Chief Product Strategist EBSCO Information Services
  18. 18. Gathering usage is just the first step…
  19. 19. and usage is just one piece of the puzzle.
  20. 20. Effective collection analysis involves combining usage with other data for a more complete picture and presenting that information in a meaningful context.
  21. 21. Examples of usage in the workflow (presenting usage in context)
  22. 22. Subscription renewals
  23. 23. Subscription renewals
  24. 24. Subscription renewals Instant access to cost- per-use and holdings data streamlines the renewal process.
  25. 25. Individual Titles
  26. 26. Individual Titles Detailed analysis, holdings and usage available for individual orders.
  27. 27. Publisher packages
  28. 28. Publisher packages Package-level totals presented
  29. 29. Publisher packages Quick charts to see the “health” of the package.
  30. 30. Publisher Packages
  31. 31. Publisher Packages Usage and cost-per-use in package details facilitates decisions on “swaps” and “drops”.
  32. 32. Usage vs other metrics
  33. 33. Usage: The Key Metric % of librarians indicating a metric as very important when making content decisions Source: EBSCO, 2012; EBSCO Library Collection and Budgeting Trends Survey, 2012
  34. 34. We asked librarians how they use usage statistics: 98% for cancellation and/or renewal decisions 72% for journal package negotiations Source: EBSCO, 2012; EBSCO Library Collection and Budgeting Trends Survey, 2012 Why Usage Statistics Are Important
  35. 35. Including other metric types
  36. 36. Including other metric types This library has included Impact Factor and Eigenfactor scores.
  37. 37. Decisions and challenges related to usage and collection analysis
  38. 38. Usage from all platforms vs publisher platform
  39. 39. Usage from all platforms vs publisher platform This reports provides analysis for the publisher platform and all platforms. Is this an important title for this library’s users?
  40. 40. Subscriptions to “Combinations” We have a single order that is for two titles.
  41. 41. Subscriptions to “Combinations” The order is mapped to both titles in holdings
  42. 42. Subscriptions to “Combinations” Usage for this “order” accumulates usage from both titles so cost- per-use is meaningful.
  43. 43. Mapping the data and analyzing packages…
  44. 44. Putting it all together: the basics The goal A report showing subscribed titles with their cost, use and cost-per-use.
  45. 45. Putting it all together: the basics Usage Cost
  46. 46. Putting it all together: the basics Usage Cost How do you connect usage to cost? ISSN?
  47. 47. Putting it all together: the basics Usage Cost How do you connect usage to cost? ISSN? Challenges with ISSN matching - Wrong or missing ISSN - Same ISSN on multiple rows in COUNTER reports - Same ISSN on multiple reports - Combinations have one cost item but multiple usage entries - Titles change publishers (ISSN changes) - Publishers change platforms
  48. 48. Putting it all together: packages Usage Cost The goal Create a package analysis with package-level summary.
  49. 49. Putting it all together: packages Usage Cost How do you know what is included in the package? Challenges Analyzing the package as a unit means accumulating cost and usage for the entire package. COUNTER statistics are reported at the “Platform” level so the package content is not defined in the report.
  50. 50. Putting it all together: packages Usage Cost How do you know what is included in the package?Solution Incorporate detailed holdings and/or package definition into the analysis. Holdings
  51. 51. Putting it all together: other data Usage CostHoldings Other The goal Add impact factors and other key-decision data to the report.
  52. 52. Putting it all together: other data Usage Cost How do you connect the other data? ISSN? Holdings Other
  53. 53. Putting it all together: other data Usage Cost How do you connect the other data? ISSN? Holdings Other Inclusion of impact factors, faculty recommendations, do- not-cancel information has similar mapping challenges.
  54. 54. Putting it all together Usage CostHoldings Other The goal Make this process repeatable and as simple as possible.
  55. 55. Putting it all together Usage CostHoldings Other What technology can do all this?
  56. 56. Putting it all together Usage CostHoldings Other What technology can do all this? Some options • Excel • MS Access or similar • Commercial products with central knowledge base to handle the mappings.
  57. 57. Summary • Usage is a means to an end • Usage needs to be combined with other data to be truly effective • Providing usage and related metrics within the workflow can improve efficiency and quality of decision making • The act of “combining” usage and other data has several challenges • Close sometimes has to be good enough • Knowledge base centric applications will help with the mapping
  58. 58. Thank you opesch@ebsco.com
  59. 59. Usage in the Eye of the Beholder: Developing Academic Library Usage Reports that Meet the Needs of Your Institution Jill Emery Collection Development Librarian Portland State University
  60. 60. Usage is Contextual
  61. 61. Determine the audience  Different audiences require different data  Understand level of detail sought LSE, Audience in the Old Theatre, c1981
  62. 62. What is to Be Answered?  Knowing the outcomes sought upfront, saves time with data gathering  Review outcomes with vested parties
  63. 63. Less is More  Curtail data  Customize level of detail  Be as concise as possible OSU Special Collections & Archives: Crater Lake, looking north from the Lodge
  64. 64. Gathering Stats  Sushi  Set ingest for right reports  Next Gen ILS management
  65. 65. JR1 & JR1a  JR1-standard  JR1a-optional  Dedupe between the two LSE, Statistics Machine Room, 1964
  66. 66. Book Reports  Growing demand  BR1-standard  BR2-standard
  67. 67. Multi-Media Reports  New with Counter 4 stats  Advocate for providers to become compliant U.S. National Archives: Nitrate Film Stored in a Brick Vault
  68. 68. Gold Open Access  Another new report with Counter 4  standard report  Can be used in price negotiation
  69. 69. Typical Report Requests  Academic: ACRL, ARL, State-wide  Accreditation  Annual  Purchasing  Collection Decision
  70. 70. Academic Reports  High level  Gross numbers  Little detail
  71. 71. Annual & Accreditation  High level  Multi-year comparisons  More detail
  72. 72. Purchasing Reports  More granular detail  May be multi- year  May need to adjust more often Field Museum, Page 74 of Accounting Administration from Financial Ledger from World's Columbian Exposition 1893
  73. 73. Collection Decision Reports  Most detailed  Look at use and qualitative factors  Multi-year
  74. 74. Report Structure  Remember audience  Questions to be answered  Level of detail needed NASA, Differential Analyzer
  75. 75. Graphs/Pie Charts  Use for annual reports  Accreditation reports  Purchasing reports
  76. 76. Administrative  Keep to a page or short slide deck (5 slides)  Use graphs/pie charts to convey salient information Smithsonian, Mary Blade standing at the blackboard
  77. 77. Purchasing Reports  Combination of graphs/charts & spreadsheets  Longer to provide greater detail
  78. 78. Collection Decision Reports  Almost always spreadsheets  Simplified from COUNTER reports  Contextual detail California Historical Society: Menu, Ritz Old Poodle Dog, San Francisco
  79. 79. Thank you! Jill Emery Collection Development Librarian Portland State University jemery@pdx.edu
  80. 80. NISO/NASIG Joint Webinar • May 21, 2014 Questions? All questions will be posted with presenter answers on the NISO website following the webinar: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2014/nasig/ NISO/NASIG Webinar: Playing the Numbers: Best Practices in Acquiring, Interpreting and Applying Usage Statistics
  81. 81. Thank you for joining us today. Please take a moment to fill out the brief online survey. We look forward to hearing from you! THANK YOU
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