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Coleman: Latest trends in Data Analysis for the Scholarly and Academic Publishing Community
 

Coleman: Latest trends in Data Analysis for the Scholarly and Academic Publishing Community

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Latest trends in Data Analysis for the Scholarly and Academic Publishing Community by Lee-Ann Coleman, PhD, Head of Science, Technology and Medicine, The British Library for the October 16, 2013 NISO ...

Latest trends in Data Analysis for the Scholarly and Academic Publishing Community by Lee-Ann Coleman, PhD, Head of Science, Technology and Medicine, The British Library for the October 16, 2013 NISO Virtual Conference: Revolution or Evolution: The Organizational Impact of Electronic Content.

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  • The blood letting zodiac man is taken from one of the Library’s 15th century Harley Manuscripts They were donated to the nation in 1753 and form one of the foundation collections of the BLNot going to spend 20 minutes giving you a discourse on the representation of medicine in the medieval period although it is interesting to reflect on what some of this tells us about information – when you are complaining about writing up your work at least you don’t have to write it by hand and draw the picturesWill it still be around in 700 yearsWill people laugh at it
  • PhD focus groups: People Science & PolicyWe built evidence based on our own user research, research from the literature, and with internal consultation. But theoretical evidence of discovery as the route for the library to take needed to be backed up with something more concrete – a pilot.A pilot would allows us to test the proposition with users to get concrete evidence for the Library’s work in this area, but also something we could show those internal to the Library.
  • Some of this information was relevant to metadata, hence needing to have something in place to start selection properly.We couldn’t go out and select everything as an STM dataset at once, so for the pilot we chose a specific subject area: Living with Environmental Change – that is data from monitoring or modeling the environment. This is now also expanded to Biodiversity (for the International Year if Biodiversity in 2010) and soon there will also be records available on Neglected Tropical Diseases. In the next year we will be expanding to Food security – spanning environmental and bioscience topics, from crop genetics and animal breeding to soil quality and pollination.Guidelines were otherwise very much based on existing STM selection criteria.
  • And this is what it looks like!Research datasets material type, accessible via the I want this tab, direct link.
  • Darker blues are very useful or just useful. Lighter blues are not useful.Survey confirmed that our approach was suitable, but was it actually being used?Initial effort in promotion of the service to get feedback was high, but towards the end of the first year, when little or no time was put into promotion, usage stats showed that usage still remained stable, even given the ‘pilot’ status of the Search Our Catalogue interface itself.These data do exclude staff IP ranges, so are reading room and external visitors only.And wasn't just curiosity, this graph shows that people were clicking through to the website containing the data.
  • And just referring to other published articles where readers can’t check the facts for themselves can be problematic. A recent study (shown on the slide) demonstrated that ‘conventional wisdom’ is often not based on experimental data. The study looked at reported incubation times for various viral infections and found that half of the studies did not even provide a source for their estimate. Mapping the citation networks enabled the authors to show that the information about incubation times was often based on a small fraction of the data or on no empirical evidence. But there would be benefits if researchers could actually cite the dataset itself. This would enable people to check the facts for themselves, obtain easier access to the data (theoretically researchers should share any data that underpins a published article but in reality they often don’t), funding organisations could show better value for money if data generated could be re-used, many people or data centres who actually manage data do not receive credit for doing so but this could offer a form of acknowledgement. In addition, the process of science is aided by openness and transparency.
  • - In the same way that researchers don’t directly get DOIs for their papers, they must go via a publisher to get a DOI for them.When we say ‘data centre’ this is for ease of time – we include trusted digital/institutional repositories in this!!We work at an organisational level
  • You will see that this DOI appears quite long – data centres are free to determine the format for the DOI suffix (see slide #24).

Coleman: Latest trends in Data Analysis for the Scholarly and Academic Publishing Community Coleman: Latest trends in Data Analysis for the Scholarly and Academic Publishing Community Presentation Transcript