(1)  Ivan Herman, W3C  Sweitze Roffel, Elsevier  David De Roure, University of Oxford  Todd Carpenter, NISO  Open Disc...
(2)A grass roots effort to accelerate the pace andnature of scholarly communications and e-scholarship through technology, ...
(3)
(4)Anyone who has a stake in moving scholarly communication into the 21st century(>350 members)PublishersLibrary andInform...
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
(11)
(12)
(13)
(14)
(15)
(16)
(17)
(18)
(19)
(20)
(21)
(22)
(23)  Experts find one another’s result  They engage into private or public conversations,discussions  They may lead to ...
(24)
(25)  I found out about the paper on a social site  not through a formal bibliography  I could not get to the paper dir...
(26)  I had access to PDF: like a paper printout, but onthe screen  no access to higher resolution images  no access to...
(27)  My blog led to  additional insights, possibly to both of us  maybe some practical results •  submission of a spec...
(28)  Web sites can offer you lively experiences on  images, interactive diagrams, video, audio  possibly illustrated al...
(29)  Storage is cheap: publishing data or images beyondpure text is common place  Data mining is real: cross references...
(30)  Experts communicate through emails, Twitter,Google+, Facebook, etc.  possibly more knowledge and information flows ...
(31)  There is an information overload; people expecttechnical help in managing it  Collaborative platforms come to the ...
(32)
(33)  Web technology researchers have a special role  many of the issues are related to Web technologies  our community...
(34)  What is a publication on the Web?  documents?  pictures?  data (lots of them!)  algorithms, running code  all ...
(35)  Better tools!!!  authoring, say, XHTML is still very hard  reviewing process through the Web is almost non-existe...
(36)  Proper metadata on publications, libraries, citations  currently: “one standard is good, more is better”   Right...
Sweitze RoffelPublisher, Elsevier Amsterdam
(38)
(39)  A	  lot	  of	  these	  systems	  don’t	  really	  talk	  to	  each	  other	  that	  well	  	    LaTeX	  is	  pre	 ...
(40)•  Mission: to create a comprehensive set of math fonts
that serve the scientific and engineering community•  Unicode b...
(41)•  New,	  open-­‐source	  technology	  to	  render	  mathemaAcs	  on	  the	  web	  •  Crisp	  display	  at	  any	  lev...
(42)Video: Alain Connesexplains his paperCenter	  pane:	  “TradiAonal”	  full-­‐text	  view,	  designed	  for	  opAmal	  o...
(43)  Nice…..	    But	  mathML	  is	  sAll	  not	  real	  content	  mathemaAcs…	  	    I	  can’t	  actually	  caluculat...
(44)•  Explore	  figures	  interacAvely	  –	  zoom,	  rotate,	  etc.	  •  Download	  underlying	  data	  for	  validaAon	  ...
(45)How does it work?1.  Click on the link next tothe paper2.  Takes you to theassociated code in thecloud•  Collaboration...
(46)  For	  machine	  consumable	  code	  separaAon	  of	  form	  and	  content	  does	  not	  work.	  	    In	  arAcles...
(47)  Its	  just	  not	  there…yet	  	    It	  would	  be	  nice	  if	  mathML	  became	  content	  maths…	    Imagine	...
(48)Entities,concepts andrelationshipsSmart Content ApplicationsBetter understanding throughanalysis and visualization• Qu...
(49)CONTENTCustomers may build their own toothbrush:Run extensive searchesand use locally loadedcontent for text miningpur...
(50)Content Mining/ machine accessContent AccessibilityApp, data and visualisationintegration in ‘actionable’ papersAutoma...
(51)David De RoureResearch Objects
(52)5
(53)http://www.scilogs.com/eresearch/pages-of-history/ David De Roure5
(54)www.researchobject.org
(55)Join the W3C Community Group www.w3.org/community/roscwww.researchobject.org
(56)A computationally-enabled sense-making network of expertise,data, models and narratives
(57)david.deroure@oerc.ox.ac.ukwww.oerc.ox.ac.uk/people/dderhttp://www.scilogs.com/eresearch@dderwww.digitalsocialresearch...
Todd CarpenterExecutive Director, NISOMay 13, 2013
(59)Publishing is Changing(Rapidly)May 15, 2013 59
(60)May 15, 2013 60Image: Walters Art Museum Image: Domenico, Caron, Davis, et al.
(61)May 15, 2013 61
(62)May 15, 2013 62This image is courtesy of Ken Beauchamp, American Society for Clinical Investigation
(63)May 15, 2013 63
(64)May 15, 2013 64
(65)May 15, 2013 65Source: Citations for SEER DatabasesSource: Global Land Cover FacilitySource: International Polar YearS...
(66)May 15, 2013 66
(67)May 15, 2013 67
(68)December 17, 2012 68
(69)
(70)Founded by CrossRef,Thomson-Reuters,Nature in 2009Now 328 participantorganizations, 50 ofwhich have providedsponsorshi...
(71)May 15, 2013 71Network of institutions interested in developinglong-term preservation system for researchdata and cont...
(72)May 15, 2013 72  Formed in 2009  Now 20 members  Partnership of datacenters to assignpersistent identifiers todatase...
(73)May 15, 2013 73Altmetrics is a community of scientists,publishers and service providers exploring newways of assessing...
(74)May 15, 2013 74
(75)May 15, 2013 75
(76)May 15, 2013 76Todd CarpenterExecutive Directortcarpenter@niso.orgNational Information Standards Organization (NISO)36...
(77)Where to from here? Let’s Discuss…
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An Introduction to Force11 at WWW2013

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An introduction to Force11 and Beyond the PDF meetings presented to the WWW2013 meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on May 15, 2013. Presenters were: Ivan Herman, W3C; Sweitze Roffel, Elsevier; David De Roure, University of Oxford; and Todd Carpenter, NISO.

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An Introduction to Force11 at WWW2013

  1. 1. (1)  Ivan Herman, W3C  Sweitze Roffel, Elsevier  David De Roure, University of Oxford  Todd Carpenter, NISO  Open Discussion, Everyone
  2. 2. (2)A grass roots effort to accelerate the pace andnature of scholarly communications and e-scholarship through technology, educationand community
  3. 3. (3)
  4. 4. (4)Anyone who has a stake in moving scholarly communication into the 21st century(>350 members)PublishersLibrary andInformationscientistsPolicymakersToolbuildersFundersScienceSocialScienceHumanitiesScholars
  5. 5. (5)
  6. 6. (6)
  7. 7. (7)
  8. 8. (8)
  9. 9. (9)
  10. 10. (10)
  11. 11. (11)
  12. 12. (12)
  13. 13. (13)
  14. 14. (14)
  15. 15. (15)
  16. 16. (16)
  17. 17. (17)
  18. 18. (18)
  19. 19. (19)
  20. 20. (20)
  21. 21. (21)
  22. 22. (22)
  23. 23. (23)  Experts find one another’s result  They engage into private or public conversations,discussions  They may lead to   new results  new, possibly common actions (that did happen in our case)  They get to know and possibly influence oneanother’s view  Etc.
  24. 24. (24)
  25. 25. (25)  I found out about the paper on a social site  not through a formal bibliography  I could not get to the paper directly  though my Institute’s library has a subscription to Elsevier’sWeb site…  I was not there! I.e., I had no access  I had to know (because I am part of the community) thatthere is a preprint server
  26. 26. (26)  I had access to PDF: like a paper printout, but onthe screen  no access to higher resolution images  no access to the underlying data, so that I could checksome of the statements  no access to the algorithm to really try it out (have you evertried to read a complex computing algorithm?)  no direct link to all the other papers via the references•  if I want to read them: for each paper the whole story starts allover again!
  27. 27. (27)  My blog led to  additional insights, possibly to both of us  maybe some practical results •  submission of a specification to a standard body in this case  the paper certainly had an impact on me …  But… the whole series of communication, ofreferences, etc., go unnoticed on the authors’ officialimpact factors  and that is almost the only thing that counts for careeradvancement…
  28. 28. (28)  Web sites can offer you lively experiences on  images, interactive diagrams, video, audio  possibly illustrated algorithms running real time on demand  interactive control over remote program execution  Hyperlinks are the norm: getting from one page toanother is normal and expected
  29. 29. (29)  Storage is cheap: publishing data or images beyondpure text is common place  Data mining is real: cross references, relationships,etc., become possible if the underlying content is“software friendly”
  30. 30. (30)  Experts communicate through emails, Twitter,Google+, Facebook, etc.  possibly more knowledge and information flows throughthese channels than through “official” scientificcommunications  this flow is not measured for scientific career purposes  Pace of information exchange is higher, a publicationmust be made available almost instantaneously   compare it to the long publication delays through officialchannels
  31. 31. (31)  There is an information overload; people expecttechnical help in managing it  Collaborative platforms come to the fore wherescientific discourse may happen through commondevelopment and discussion  etc.
  32. 32. (32)
  33. 33. (33)  Web technology researchers have a special role  many of the issues are related to Web technologies  our community may provide some of the technologicalunderpinning of a new scholarly world
  34. 34. (34)  What is a publication on the Web?  documents?  pictures?  data (lots of them!)  algorithms, running code  all of the above bundled together!  What/how do you store, how to you refer to those?  How do you do meaningful search?
  35. 35. (35)  Better tools!!!  authoring, say, XHTML is still very hard  reviewing process through the Web is almost non-existent•  we need comments, annotation, revision history, provenance,…  Identity management  one can have URI-s for persons, events, publications…  …but, in practice, there are many for each, and no properbridges exists!
  36. 36. (36)  Proper metadata on publications, libraries, citations  currently: “one standard is good, more is better”   Right expressions, right management  industrial researchers have different requirements thanuniversity researchers  how to combine openness with (necessary) protection?  Better “impact factor” measures  include influence through social sites
  37. 37. Sweitze RoffelPublisher, Elsevier Amsterdam
  38. 38. (38)
  39. 39. (39)  A  lot  of  these  systems  don’t  really  talk  to  each  other  that  well      LaTeX  is  pre  webtech  -­‐  Metafont  is  incompatable  with  unicode      and  many  ,  many  more…    
  40. 40. (40)•  Mission: to create a comprehensive set of math fonts
that serve the scientific and engineering community•  Unicode based•  Applicable to both print + online•  Collaboration between AIP, ACS, AMS, IEEE, APS, 
and Elsevier•  Status:–  STIX fonts 1.1.0 released as SIL Open Fonts Licence–  LaTeX beta released early 2013–  ~300 downloads/weekhttp://www.stixfonts.org/
  41. 41. (41)•  New,  open-­‐source  technology  to  render  mathemaAcs  on  the  web  •  Crisp  display  at  any  level  of  zoom  and  seamless  integraAon  into  HTML  •  Work  with  both  MathML  and  LaTeX  •  Supports  copy-­‐paste  and  assisAve  technologies  •  Elsevier  is  an  early  supporter  of  MathJax  Screenshot from the Article of the Future (http://www.articleofthefuture.com/S0022314X08001856/)showing high-resolution math display at any level of zoom http://www.mathjax.org/
  42. 42. (42)Video: Alain Connesexplains his paperCenter  pane:  “TradiAonal”  full-­‐text  view,  designed  for  opAmal  online  reading  experience  Right pane: Additionalcontent & tools. Shownhere: theorem browserLeft pane:efficientnavigation &browsing
  43. 43. (43)  Nice…..    But  mathML  is  sAll  not  real  content  mathemaAcs…      I  can’t  actually  caluculate  with  it  
  44. 44. (44)•  Explore  figures  interacAvely  –  zoom,  rotate,  etc.  •  Download  underlying  data  for  validaAon  &  re-­‐use  http://www.elsevier.com/matlab
  45. 45. (45)How does it work?1.  Click on the link next tothe paper2.  Takes you to theassociated code in thecloud•  Collaboration with 3rd party thatstores the code page•  Supports R and , well matlab•  Links back and forth•  Currently live on Science Direct ona number of journals
  46. 46. (46)  For  machine  consumable  code  separaAon  of  form  and  content  does  not  work.      In  arAcles  code  is  oUen  a  ‘picture’  to  keep  lay  out  intact  in  XML/HTML/  PDF    So  we  need  to  get  the  actual  code  file  from  authors  –  keep  this  file  intact  through  the  whole  publicaAon  process  to  render  it  back  to  readers  ;  but  within  the  XML  enriched  arAcle  at  the  correct  place    Currently  piloAng  this  new  process  on               the Journal of Web Semanitcs Guide For Authors; http://www.elsevier.com/about/content-innovation/inline-supplementary-material-for-journal-articlesPlease: withyour next JWSarticle submityour code alsoas a .txt ISM file
  47. 47. (47)  Its  just  not  there…yet      It  would  be  nice  if  mathML  became  content  maths…    Imagine  the  services  one  could  build  with  machine  readable  mathemaAcs      Linking  theory  to  algorithms  to  forges  and  back…    Happy  to  help    
  48. 48. (48)Entities,concepts andrelationshipsSmart Content ApplicationsBetter understanding throughanalysis and visualization• Question & Answer"• Actionable Content & Alerts"• Tag clouds• Heatmaps"• Animations"Better discovery throughsemantic search & navigation• Faceted search & browse• Ontology-driven navigation• Task-specific results• Personalized/localized results• Link to evidenced-based content"New knowledge throughaggregation and synthesis• Topic pages• Social network maps• Geolocation maps• Data integration and mashups"• Text mining "• Inference and ReasoningImagesTextTablesElsevierContentElsevierknowledgeorganizationsystemsLinked data frompartners and the WebPartnerContent48
  49. 49. (49)CONTENTCustomers may build their own toothbrush:Run extensive searchesand use locally loadedcontent for text miningpurposes for their ownresearch.Perform extensive mining operations onsubscribed content . Structuring input text Deriving patterns within the structured text Evaluation and interpretation of the output.Extract semantic entitiesfrom Elsevier content for thepurpose of recognition andclassification of the relationsbetween themIntegrate results on a server used for thecustomer’s own mining system for accessand use by its researchers through thecustomer’s internal secure network.Enabling developers who wish todesign and implement applications toanalyse our content, or testapplications as part of their researchwithin Elsevier content1
  50. 50. (50)Content Mining/ machine accessContent AccessibilityApp, data and visualisationintegration in ‘actionable’ papersAutomateddiscovery for thosewith no time to readConsistent high-quality formatsand stable identifiersDigital preservationMobile devices/apps21st Century RightsManagement
  51. 51. (51)David De RoureResearch Objects
  52. 52. (52)5
  53. 53. (53)http://www.scilogs.com/eresearch/pages-of-history/ David De Roure5
  54. 54. (54)www.researchobject.org
  55. 55. (55)Join the W3C Community Group www.w3.org/community/roscwww.researchobject.org
  56. 56. (56)A computationally-enabled sense-making network of expertise,data, models and narratives
  57. 57. (57)david.deroure@oerc.ox.ac.ukwww.oerc.ox.ac.uk/people/dderhttp://www.scilogs.com/eresearch@dderwww.digitalsocialresearch.netdigital.humanities.ox.ac.ukwww.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.ukwww.software.ac.ukwebscience.org5
  58. 58. Todd CarpenterExecutive Director, NISOMay 13, 2013
  59. 59. (59)Publishing is Changing(Rapidly)May 15, 2013 59
  60. 60. (60)May 15, 2013 60Image: Walters Art Museum Image: Domenico, Caron, Davis, et al.
  61. 61. (61)May 15, 2013 61
  62. 62. (62)May 15, 2013 62This image is courtesy of Ken Beauchamp, American Society for Clinical Investigation
  63. 63. (63)May 15, 2013 63
  64. 64. (64)May 15, 2013 64
  65. 65. (65)May 15, 2013 65Source: Citations for SEER DatabasesSource: Global Land Cover FacilitySource: International Polar YearSource: ICPSRSource: The Economist
  66. 66. (66)May 15, 2013 66
  67. 67. (67)May 15, 2013 67
  68. 68. (68)December 17, 2012 68
  69. 69. (69)
  70. 70. (70)Founded by CrossRef,Thomson-Reuters,Nature in 2009Now 328 participantorganizations, 50 ofwhich have providedsponsorship fundingPrototype technologyLaunched in fall 2011May 15, 2013 70
  71. 71. (71)May 15, 2013 71Network of institutions interested in developinglong-term preservation system for researchdata and contentFederated approach to preservationEcosystem of repositories acting as nodescontributing “dark content” to the networkReplicating nodes contain redundant, darkcopies of all deposits that can be brightened incases of catastrophic lossWill launch in early 2013
  72. 72. (72)May 15, 2013 72  Formed in 2009  Now 20 members  Partnership of datacenters to assignpersistent identifiers todatasets  Initially using DOIs  Provide discoveryservices related todata
  73. 73. (73)May 15, 2013 73Altmetrics is a community of scientists,publishers and service providers exploring newways of assessing scholarly impact in novelwaysHow do we apply usage data, downloads, socialmedia mentions, social graph, traditionalcitations, page rank, linking, “saving” in citationservices, to both traditional and new mediaAddressing questions like: what is the use of adata set or a piece of software mean?Capture a richer set of assessment measures
  74. 74. (74)May 15, 2013 74
  75. 75. (75)May 15, 2013 75
  76. 76. (76)May 15, 2013 76Todd CarpenterExecutive Directortcarpenter@niso.orgNational Information Standards Organization (NISO)3600 Clipper Mill Road, Suite 302Baltimore, MD 21211 USA+1 (301) 654-2512www.niso.org
  77. 77. (77)Where to from here? Let’s Discuss…

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