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Cathal Renewable gas presentation 12.11.10

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Cathal Renewable gas presentation 12.11.10 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Future of Renewable Gas in Ireland 1
  • 2. Some Context …. • Energy demand in Ireland has increased by 72% from 1991 to 2008 characterised by; • The Renewable Energy targets are quite challenging; • 40% of electricity to come from renewable sources by 2020 • 12% of heat to be derived from renewable sources by 2020 • Renewable resources to account for 10% of all transport fuel by 2020 • Ireland is making progress addressing RES (E); • 11.8% of 2009 electricity consumption from renewable sources • RES (H) and RES (T) progress towards targets have been slow to date; • 3.6% of thermal energy and 1.2% of transport energy from renewable sources in 2008 • Landfill Directive • Renewable gas produced from biomass using Anaerobic Digestion represents a significant and under represented source of renewable energy in Ireland. 2
  • 3. Biogas is produced when feedstocks, such as organic wastes, and energy crops, are converted into biogas using anaerobic digestion technology 3
  • 4. Injection into the gas network may look like… Di Digestat ge If quality is not good enough! sta t Treatment Compression Compression Process Control, (CH4 Control (CH 4 Substrat (s) Methanisation Raw biogas (CO2,H2S, Upgraded gas (few bars) CO2, water,S, H2O) 2 O2, H2 H 2S) water, traces) • Bio waste Composition: Composition similar to • Sewage • 50 - 65% CH 4 natural gas Odorisation/ LPG* Odorisation • Food - • 30 - 40% CO 2 processing waste • water •… Energy crops • H2S Regulator for flow / pressure (2nd • NH 3 compressor?) • traces Metering Safety equipments (shut -off valve, safety valve … ) Valve Control of gas quality Injection point Out of the limits Natural gas + Biogas Natural gas Vent or storage 4
  • 5. Linkoping Sweden 5
  • 6. Feed stock for Linkoping 7,000t/a of pig 47,000t/a of slurry slaughter waste Blood and process water 6 pumped in
  • 7. Biogas treatment Collection over Scrubbing Compression digester and storage 7
  • 8. 65 buses, 10 waste collection lorries, 600 cars… 8
  • 9. And a train 9
  • 10. Biogas from grass as transport fuel in Salzburg silage storage harvest weigh bridge 10 macerator Biogas service station anaerobic digester Source: energiewerkstatt, IEA and persona photos
  • 11. Renewable Gas has a key role to play in a low carbon future for Ireland • Simple efficiency measures across all sectors • Decarbonised electricity fuels zero emission cars • Decarbonise gas using renewable gas 11
  • 12. Opportunity– Renewable Heating Biomethane for Heating • Utilise the Bord Gáis gas network as a route to market for renewable heating with biomethane (BioNG): – Over 700,000 domestic and 30,000 I/C customers served by the network. – Uses existing meters (incl. Smart Meters when available). – Minimal changes to supplier billing systems. – No disruption to premises required – will allow customers switch to renewable heating with a phone call! – Used in existing appliances….. At very high efficiencies • e.g. 80% for a gas boiler, • as a renewable fuel source for domestic and I/C CHP units). – Increases national fuel diversity and security of supply. – Significant contribution towards the RES-H target possible. 12
  • 13. Opportunity- Renewable Transport Biomethane for Transport • Utilise the Bord Gáis gas network as a route to market for renewable transport with biomethane (BioCNG): – Over 11 million cars worldwide running on CNG incl. Germany, Italy. – Bi-fuel cars and vans available – can switch from petrol to CNG seamlessly at the push of a button! – Significant contribution towards the RES-T target possible and reductions in national CO2 levels. – Proven vehicle and re-fuelling options available today. 13
  • 14. Biomethane across Europe 14
  • 15. Potential for Renewable Gas in Ireland Figures converted from PJ to mscm natural Practical Gas equivalent (@ 36.8 MJ/m³) (mscm pa) Agricultural Slurry 51 OFMSW 15.6 Slaughter Waste 18.6 Surplus Grass 325.7 Total 410 As % of total Irish gas demand 7.5% • Notes: • 1. 3,873,525 tonnes agricultural slurry x 12.8m3 methane (CH4) per tonne x 1/0.97= 51.3Mm3 biomethane per annum (with 97% CH4 content). • 2. 870,000 tonnes OFMSW x 25% recoverable x 69 m3 CH4 per tonne x 1/0.97= 15.6 Mm3 biomethane per annum. • 3. 208,877 tonnes slaughter waste x 86 m3 CH4 per tonne x 1/0.97= 18.6 Mm3 biomethane per annum. • 4. 97,500 hectares x 3,240 m3 CH4 per hectare x 1/0.97 = 325.7 Mm3 biomethane per annum. • 5. Conversion assumes biomethane has an energy content of 36.8 MJ/Mm3. 15
  • 16. Irish Renewable Targets National Targets • RES-E: 40% electricity from renewable sources by 2020. • RES-H: 12% heating from renewable sources by 2020: – Renewable energy accounted for 3.6% of thermal energy in 2008 – Bio methane could deliver 6.5% to this target • RES-T: 10% renewable fuels for transport by 2020: – Renewable energy accounted for 1.2% of transport energy in 2008 – Bio methane could exceed this target (12%) • Source: SEI EPSSU Energy in Ireland Key Statistics 2009. 16
  • 17. The Cost of Producing Biomethane Feedstock/scenario €/mn3 OFMSW (50,000 t/a) 0.14 Slaughter Waste (50,000 t/a) 0.73 Grass (137 ha, farm model) 0.97 Grass (137 ha, developer 1.10 model) Co-digest (slurry & grass) 1.23 Slurry (29,700 t/a) 1.83 The Cost of producing Biomethane, Green Gas Technologies Ltd., March 2010 17
  • 18. Regional potential for grass biomethane • Assessment criteria – Pasture area – Grass yields – Current farming practice – Gas grid coverage – Availability of belly grass Source: Determing the regional potential for a grass biomethane industry, Submitted to Applied Energy, October 2010. 18
  • 19. Resource mapping Percentage pasture Grass yields, gas grid & slaughter- houses 19 Source: EPA Corine Land Cover Data
  • 20. Potential for grass Grass biogas Grass biomethane Grass + belly grass biomethane 20
  • 21. Ballyhoura Ballyhoura: • Within an area of high potential • High pasture coverage • Good gas grid coverage • Good availability of belly grass Resource calculation: • 20 km transport distance to gas grid 21
  • 22. Ballyhoura: enough biomethane to heat 32,000 homes Annual Biomethane Energy Cars Houses feedstock (Mmn3 yr-1) (PJ yr-1) (nr yr-1) (nr yr-1) Grass silage 261,727 ha 910.6 33.37 855,696 644,250 5% grass 13,086 ha 45.5 1.67 42,785 32,213 silage Belly grass 5094 t 0.3 0.01 316 238 (20%DS) Total (5% 45.9 1.68 43,101 32,450 grass + belly grass) Number of private cars in Limerick (city + county): 84,170 Number of meter points in Limerick (city + county): 25,366 22