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Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010
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Balanced Growth Presentation 3-24-2010

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  • We are going to briefly revisit where the partnership stands at this point and what the draft time line is for the next 2 years or so. Right now where we stand is still in the initial steps, we are getting organized and today is our first getting down to business meeting, preparing for our next step which is to agree on PCA and PDA criteria, but first we have to define what we mean by priority conservation area and priority development area, what it means to the Olentangy partnershipAgree on PCA/PDA CriteriaProvide Data to MembersCreate Initial MapsRevise MapsApprove MapsID Implementation MethodsSelect MethodsFinal Plan for ApprovalApproval by the PartnershipOWRC EndorsementImplementation
  • What are your expectations of this meeting?This is what we want to accomplish today and the trajectory for today’s meeting.First I’m going to go over a review of why we are doing a balanced growth plan and what it generally accomplishes.Second I’ll discuss developing goals for the partnership and go over what past balanced growth plans have set their main goals to accomplish to be. Third we will learn about what it really means to be a PCA, PDA, or PAA (if selected) and the designation process for those areasFourth, Erin will discuss past balanced growth planning effortsAnd finally we’ll start creating our own definitions and setting the partnership’s own goals and schedules for the balanced growth plans
  • Balanced growth planning is a process where communities come together to develop a plan that transcends jurisdictional boundaries. The idea being that development and nature more often than not, do not follow along political boundaries. By working in concert, we can create a plan that better serves the region, the watershed, and the communities in the watershed partnership by recognizing the impacts development and conservation efforts have not only at the individual community level, but on a broader level, between and among communities. Coordinating with other communities provides the partnership with the opportunity to create quality development and take on better conservation efforts.Balanced growth planning is a proactive process, its thinking about our present and future critically rather than simply an after thought. Balance Growth planning entails a regional focus on land use and development, identifying priority areas for conservation, development, and if sought, agriculture. Upon agreeing on criteria to designate these areas in the partnership, communities can move forward with implementation efforts to preserve areas they want to preserve and develop areas they want to develop with a number of incentives aligned with those implementation efforts.
  • Before we get into developing goals and getting into some ideas from past plans, it’s a good idea to give you a little background on the previous Balanced Growth Plans that Erin and I will be referencing throughout the presentation, there are four of them in Ohio.The Upper West Branch, located in the heart of Medina County, is comprisedof four sub-watersheds and a portion of a fifth at the headwaters of the RockyRiver. The entire Upper West Branch lies within Medina County. Portions of 7 townships (Brunswick Hills, Granger, Hinckley, Lafayette, Medina, Montville, and Sharon) as well as the municipalities of Brunswick and Medina, share the watershed.Swan Creek is a tributary of the Maumee River, which itself drains into Lake Erie. Swan Creek is 40miles long; its watershed includes more than 200 miles of smaller streams, draining 204 square miles of Lucas, Fulton, and Henry counties in northwest Ohio. The watershed includes all or part of 23 political jurisdictions: three counties, two cities, five villages, and 13 townships.The Chagrin River is located in northeast Ohio, containing portions of the city of mentor, chagrin township, aurora, and a number of other communities, just east and southeast of the Cleveland area.The Chippewa Creek watershed is located in Cuyahoga County, an urbanizing watershed within the Cuyahoga River Watershed. Chippewa Creek Watershed covers approximately 17 squaremiles, and drains portions of five communities – Brecksville, Broadview Heights, North Royalton, Seven Hills and Parma. Chippewa Creek stretches nearly eight miles, winding throughsuburban neighborhoods and, before discharging into the Cuyahoga River
  • Something we might want to think about is establishing goals for the Olentangy watershed partnership, so keep this in mind as we go through some potential criteria for designating areas as PCA, PDA, and PAA’s, and past plans: What are the partnerships goals in endeavoring on this balanced growth planning process?Accommodating a reasonable amount of growth is essential, but it needs to be done right. Establishing PDA’s really helps to focus development where the communities want it and may help take advantage of much of the existing infrastructure, its planning proactively rather than as an afterthought. Maintaining the aesthetic appeal of the watershed, so by conserving and preserving natural areas we can be assured that the watershed will look nice.And finally maintaining the watershed’s hydrologic and ecological function, this really involves developing where appropriate to have less impact on the hydrology and ecology of the partnership communities, and preserving natural areas that support these functions.
  • Take a look at the criteria hand out.Priority Conservation Areas (PCA): An area the local community designates to preserve, conserve, or restore. Priority Development Areas (PDA): An area the local community targets for potential future development or redevelopmentPriority Agricultural Area (PAA): An area the local community designates as prime agricultural or farm land. Now I am going to go through a brief cross-section of potential PCA and PDA criteria that you might want to keep in mind, because if you remember, the next step in the planning process is to define what PCA and PDA’s are and then identify the criteria that areas need to meet to qualify for designation as a PCA or PDA
  • Wetlands
  • Steep slopes
  • Park areas and open space
  • Flood plains
  • Bike and walking trails
  • Cultural gems like the Harding House
  • Defining the criteria (Flood plain: 100 year flood plain? 500 year?) (Parks: Metro parks? State parks? Etc.)We will be selecting the criterion that we will use to analyze land and parcels. These are the criterion that the partnership will ultimately decide upon and will be used to identify areas in the watershed partnership that meet the definitions for PCA, PDA, and PAA’s as defined by the OWPP.We will have to identify a data source for all of the criteria. There has to be a data source in order to create the maps using the criteria. So for example, we might use the FEMA 100 year flood maps for information on where floodplains are in the watershed, and then with other criteria, like location of cultural gems, we may need the communities to provide us information regarding where these are located or a national inventory of historical sites, just as two general examples.
  • Now as a reminder, we will have to identify a data source for all of the criteria. There has to be a data source in order to create the maps using the criteria. So for example, we might use the census bureau for information on population concentration and then with other criteria, like location of libraries, we may need the communities to provide us information regarding where libraries are located, just as two general examples.
  • For example for a PCA in the Olentangy watershed, we might select open space as one of the criterion that qualify a parcel of land to be designated as a priority conservation area and define that as golf courses, recreation space, green space, and parks. We have identified a data source in this map and highlighted those areas within the watershed. Having done that, these areas are candidates for designation as Priority Conservation Areas.
  • Now an example for a PDA in the Olentangy watershed, we might select “proximity to major highways” as one of the criterion that qualify a parcel of land to be designated as a priority development area and we might define that as within 1,000 feet of a highway. We have identified a data source in this map and highlighted those areas within the watershed that fall within 1,000 feet of the highway. Having done that, these areas are candidates for designation as Priority Development Areas.
  • At a closer community level, a PDA map might look a little something like this, with an area designated as a PDA based on being located within 1,000 feet of a major highway.
  • Something we might want to think about is establishing goals for the Olentangy watershed partnership, so keep this in mind as we go through some potential criteria for designating areas as PCA, PDA, and PAA’s, and past plans: What are the partnerships goals in endeavoring on this balanced growth planning process?Accommodating a reasonable amount of growth is essential, but it needs to be done right. Establishing PDA’s really helps to focus development where the communities want it and may help take advantage of much of the existing infrastructure, its planning proactively rather than as an afterthought. Maintaining the aesthetic appeal of the watershed, so by conserving and preserving natural areas we can be assured that the watershed will look nice.And finally maintaining the watershed’s hydrologic and ecological function, this really involves developing where appropriate to have less impact on the hydrology and ecology of the partnership communities, and preserving natural areas that support these functions.
  • Each watershed partnership determines its own definitions for Priority Conservation Areas and Priority Development Areas.For example, Chagrin River plan emphasized maximizing development potential in their definition of priority development area, while…
  • The Chippewa Creek Watershed plan shaped its definition of PDAs to emphasize minimizing the negative potential impacts of development on the watershed.
  • The Rocky River WPP further described the intended functions of PCAs to:* Protect the ecological health of the watershed and tributaries.* Provide a process by which areas containing environmental, natural, historic or archaeologicalresources of critical watershed concern may be identified and protected from substantial deteriorationor loss.* Provide procedures by which areas of critical watershed concern may be designated.* Protect and enhance public health, safety, and welfare.* Guide state programs, policies, and investments that influence the location of conservation and/ordevelopment.
  • Designation criteria are:Used to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsDetermined by the watershed planning partnershipIntended to reflect the priorities of the partershipExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Designation criteria are:Used to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsDetermined by the watershed planning partnershipIntended to reflect the priorities of the partershipExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Designation criteria are:Used to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsDetermined by the watershed planning partnershipIntended to reflect the priorities of the partershipExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Designation criteria are:Used to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsDetermined by the watershed planning partnershipIntended to reflect the priorities of the partershipExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Designation criteria are:Used to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsDetermined by the watershed planning partnershipIntended to reflect the priorities of the partershipExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Designation criteria are:Used to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsDetermined by the watershed planning partnershipIntended to reflect the priorities of the partershipExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Designation criteria are:MeasureableDetermined by the Olentangy Watershed Planning Partnership (OWPP)Intended to reflect the priorities of the OWPPUsed to highlight potential PCAs and PDAsExamples of criteria selected by past watershed partnerships include:PCAsWetlands Steep slopes Historical Sites Wildlife preserves Parks Scenic areas Recreational areas 100-year flood plain Cultural sites PDAsExisting roadway infrastructureUtility accessPublic transportationCommercial corridorsWater treatment facilitiesPopulation concentrationsAdjacent developmentLandfillsBlighted areas
  • Not all areas are created equal, different areas have different characteristics, and the partnership may wish to establish a system of weights to differentiate the importance of particular criteria in the priority designation process. One possibility in establishing the priority maps is to use a weighting system. So for example in the Swan Creek Plan, they went area by area for each selection criterion to determine the value of that characteristic, the weighting system is used to determine the relative influence of a criterion in designating an area as a PDA, etc.Using the weighting system, particular pixel/area might be a simple case of yes or no. So wetlands for example, they either exist or not or on a scale.So for example, does an area exist within the incorporated area? If yes that’s a rank of 4, and that is weighted 6 for a total of 24 points. Does that area have water availability (is it less than .5 miles from a water line? Yes or no?) Yes, that’s a rank of 4 with a weight of 5 for a total of 20 points. Lets say the population is between 40 and 3149 people/sq. mile, with a rank of 1 and a weight of 4, for a total of 4 points, so on and so forth, then you add up all those points. If it had a rank of 4 for each criteria, you could have a maximum of 84 points in this case.Then, all those areas scoring in a certain percentile were designated as the Priority Development Areas
  • Not all areas are created equal, different areas have different characteristics, and the partnership may wish to establish a system of weights to differentiate the importance of particular criteria in the priority designation process. One possibility in establishing the priority maps is to use a weighting system. So for example in the Swan Creek Plan, they went area by area for each selection criterion to determine the value of that characteristic, the weighting system is used to determine the relative influence of a criterion in designating an area as a PDA, etc.Using the weighting system, particular pixel/area might be a simple case of yes or no. So wetlands for example, they either exist or not or on a scale.So for example, does an area exist within the incorporated area? If yes that’s a rank of 4, and that is weighted 6 for a total of 24 points. Does that area have water availability (is it less than .5 miles from a water line? Yes or no?) Yes, that’s a rank of 4 with a weight of 5 for a total of 20 points. Lets say the population is between 40 and 3149 people/sq. mile, with a rank of 1 and a weight of 4, for a total of 4 points, so on and so forth, then you add up all those points. If it had a rank of 4 for each criteria, you could have a maximum of 84 points in this case.Then, all those areas scoring in a certain percentile were designated as the Priority Development Areas
  • Not all areas are created equal, different areas have different characteristics, and the partnership may wish to establish a system of weights to differentiate the importance of particular criteria in the priority designation process. One possibility in establishing the priority maps is to use a weighting system. So for example in the Swan Creek Plan, they went area by area for each selection criterion to determine the value of that characteristic, the weighting system is used to determine the relative influence of a criterion in designating an area as a PDA, etc.Using the weighting system, particular pixel/area might be a simple case of yes or no. So wetlands for example, they either exist or not or on a scale.So for example, does an area exist within the incorporated area? If yes that’s a rank of 4, and that is weighted 6 for a total of 24 points. Does that area have water availability (is it less than .5 miles from a water line? Yes or no?) Yes, that’s a rank of 4 with a weight of 5 for a total of 20 points. Lets say the population is between 40 and 3149 people/sq. mile, with a rank of 1 and a weight of 4, for a total of 4 points, so on and so forth, then you add up all those points. If it had a rank of 4 for each criteria, you could have a maximum of 84 points in this case.Then, all those areas scoring in a certain percentile were designated as the Priority Development Areas
  • This is the criterion applied as the community level.
  • COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ZONING andSANITARY SEWER SERVICE in conjunction withPROXIMITY TO MAJOR HIGHWAYS
  • Using those criterion they designated the areas that were best for development as PDAs, those areas that were commercial or enterprise zones, and those areas that also had sufficient sewer service and roadway access. PCA and PDA overlap- Create a new classification, orIn applying state incentives to overlap areas, the first consideration would be given to protecting, preserving, or enhancing environmentally sensitive areas. Any project to promote conservation inthese areas would be encouraged. Development would only be encouraged in these areas if appropriateBMPs were applied to protect the PCA component. These areas would be ideal for projectsthat would incorporate innovative features such as green roofs, pervious pavement and otherlow impact designs.Once the areas have been designated on maps and revised, the maps can go on to finalization.
  • Chagrin River Plan -No PAA, but did include “preservation of farmland” in the PCA definition-”Preservation of farmland” is also listed as an implementation toolChippewa Creek Plan - No PAA designation, BUT- “Farm conservation is a long term Balanced Growth Initiative goal”Rocky River Plan- does have PAA- Rocky River Upper West Branch WPP wanted separate priority category because: - agricultural land use could be a factor for either conservation or dev based on practices applied - hope that farms in PAAs may receive extra consideration for state ag programs - preserve watershed’s rural heritage
  • Swan Creek Plan- Does have PAA- PAA inclusion specifically requested early on by Fulton County rep- rationale that factors considered for conservation of habitat and non-human pops different than factors considered for conservation of farmlandExamples of PAA criteria from past plans:- Farmland enrolled in Agricultural Districts- Operating farms- Size of farmsPrime and locally important farmland soilsDo we (OWPP) want to designate Priority Agricultural Areas?(Open up for group discussion – 10 minutes & decision)
  • This is what we want to accomplish today and the trajectory for today’s meeting.
  • Something we might want to think about is establishing goals for the Olentangy watershed partnership, so keep this in mind as we go through some potential criteria for designating areas as PCA, PDA, and PAA’s, and past plans: What are the partnerships goals in endeavoring on this balanced growth planning process?Accommodating a reasonable amount of growth is essential, but it needs to be done right. Establishing PDA’s really helps to focus development where the communities want it and may help take advantage of much of the existing infrastructure, its planning proactively rather than as an afterthought. Maintaining the aesthetic appeal of the watershed, so by conserving and preserving natural areas we can be assured that the watershed will look nice.And finally maintaining the watershed’s hydrologic and ecological function, this really involves developing where appropriate to have less impact on the hydrology and ecology of the partnership communities, and preserving natural areas that support these functions.
  • We have discussed how each of the partnerships creates its own definitions for PCAs and PDAs as part of the planning processThere are similarities between how each of the partnerships defines these terms, but this is also an opportunity to emphasize issues that are locally/regionally important
  • Transcript

    • 1. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Welcome, Introductions, Review of Agenda
    • 2. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      The Process:
      • Get Organized
      • 3. Agree on PCA/PDA Criteria
      • 4. Provide Data to Members
      • 5. Create Initial Maps
      • 6. Revise Maps
      • 7. Approve Maps
      • 8. ID Implementation Methods
      • 9. Select Methods
      • 10. Final Plan for Approval
      • 11. Approval by the Partnership
      • 12. OWRC Endorsement
      • 13. Implementation
      The Schedule:
    • OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Why Balanced Growth ?
      Developing Goals for the OWPP
      What it means to be a PCA, PDA, or PAA and the process of designating the areas.
      Past Balanced Growth Planning
      Creating definitions for the OWPP and setting timeline for next steps
    • 25. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Why Balanced Growth Planning ?
      “Balanced Growth is a voluntary, incentive based strategy to protect and restore [Ohio’s watersheds] to assure long-term economic competitiveness, ecological health, and quality of life.”
      -BalancedGrowth.Ohio.gov
    • 26. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Review of the Balanced Growth Process: Past Plans
      Clockwise: Rocky River West Branch, Swan Creek, Chagrin River, and Chippewa Creek
    • 27. Chagrin River Watershed Balanced Growth Goal(s)
      Source: Chagrin River Watershed Balanced Growth Plan
    • 28. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Generally Defining:
      1. Priority Conservation Areas (PCA)
      2. Priority Development Areas (PDA)
      3. Priority Agricultural Areas (PAA) if selected.
    • 29.
    • 30. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Wetlands
      Source: Image After
      PCA
    • 31. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Steep Slope
      Source: Image After
      PCA
    • 32. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Parks
      Source: Image After
      PCA
    • 33. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Floodplain
      Source: Image After
      PCA
    • 34. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Trails
      Source: Image After
      PCA
    • 35. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Culture
      Source: OhioHistory.org
      PCA
    • 36. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      PCA
      Steep Slope
      Parkland
      Wetlands
      BikeTrail
      Floodplain
      Culture
      Source: Image After, Ohiohistory.org
    • 37. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Highways
      Source: Image After
      PDA
    • 38. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Libraries
      Source: Image After
      PDA
    • 39. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Brownfield
      Source: Image After
      PDA
    • 40. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Population Density
      Source: Image After
      PDA
    • 41. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Landfill
      Source: Image After
      PDA
    • 42. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Blight
      Source: Image After
      PDA
    • 43. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      PDA
      Brownfield
      Libraries
      Roadway
      Population
      Landfills
      Blight
      Source: Image After
    • 44. Potential Priority Conservation Areas (PCA)
    • 45. Potential Priority Development Areas (PDA)
    • 46.
    • 47. Chagrin River Watershed Balanced Growth Goal(s)
      Source: Chagrin River Watershed Balanced Growth Plan
    • 48. Chagrin River Watershed
      PCAs are locally designated areas for protection and restoration. They may be important ecological, recreational, heritage, agricultural, and public access areas that are significant for their contribution to Lake Erie water quality and general quality of life.
      PDAsare locally designated areas where development and/or redevelopment is to be encouraged in order to maximize development potential, maximize the efficient use of infrastructure, promote revitalization of cities and towns, and contribute to the restoration of Lake Erie.
    • 49. Chippewa Creek Watershed
      PCAs are locations where land use change is predicted to have a high impact on the watershed in terms of flooding, erosion, and water quality, based on the analysis of several data sets representing
      criteria that the watershed planning partners determined were of interest.
      PDAs are locations where
      land use changes are predicted to have minimal
      impact on the watershed and where conditions
      suggest that additional development may be
      appropriate.
    • 50. Rocky River Upper West Branch
      PCAs are locally designated areas targeted for protection and restoration.
      PDAsare locally designated areas where growth and/or redevelopment is to
      be especially promoted in order to maximize development potential, efficiently utilize infrastructure,
      revitalize existing cities and towns, and contribute to the restoration of Lake Erie.
    • 51. Swan Creek Watershed
      A PCA is a locally designated area targeted for protection and restoration of existing or restorable natural resources.
      A PDA is a locally designated area where growth / redevelopment should be promoted to maximize development potential, efficiently utilize existing infrastructure, revitalize communities, and contribute to the restoration of Lake Erie.
    • 52. Priority Conservation Areas
      Chagrin River Watershed
      Rocky River Upper West Branch
      Swan Creek Watershed
      Chippewa Creek Watershed
    • 53. Priority Development Areas
      Chagrin River Watershed
      Rocky River Upper West Branch
      Swan Creek Watershed
      Chippewa Creek Watershed
    • 54. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
      FLOODPLAINS
    • 55. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
      RIPARIAN AREAS
    • 56. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
      FORESTS
    • 57. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
      STEEP SLOPES
    • 58. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
      PARKLANDS
      &
      CONSERVATION
      EASEMENTS
    • 59. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
      WETLANDS
    • 60. Criteria Selection
      Rocky River Plan Priority Conservation Area Criteria
    • 61. Swan Creek PDA Weighting
    • 62. Swan Creek PDA Weighting
    • 63. Swan Creek PDA Weighting
    • 64. Washington Township
      (Swan Creek)
    • 65. Rocky River PDA Criteria
    • 66. Rocky River PDA Criteria
    • 67. Priority Agricultural Areas
      Rocky River Plan
       
    • 68. Priority Agricultural Areas
      Swan Creek Plan
    • 69. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
      Review of Balanced Growth Process
      Do we want to Develop Goals?
      What it means to be a PCA, PDA, or PAA
      Past Balanced Growth Planning
      Creating definitions for the OWPP and setting time line for next steps
    • 70. Chagrin River Watershed Balanced Growth Goal(s)
      Source: Chagrin River Watershed Balanced Growth Plan
    • 71. Priority Conservation Areas
      Chagrin River Watershed
      Rocky River Upper West Branch
      Swan Creek Watershed
      Chippewa Creek Watershed
    • 72. Priority Development Areas
      Chagrin River Watershed
      Rocky River Upper West Branch
      Swan Creek Watershed
      Chippewa Creek Watershed
    • 73. OLENTANGY WATERSHED PLANNING PARTNERSHIP
    • 74. Contact Information
      Joe Kitchen
      614.233.4124
      jkitchen@morpc.org
      Erin Grushon
      614.233.4155
      egrushon@morpc.org

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