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Dcs networking

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  • 1. DCS NetworksPRESENTATION BY: ASHISHPATILPOWERPLANT,MONNET ISPAT & ENERGY LTDMANDIRHASAUD,RAIPUR.PROJECT OFFICETIME: 04:00 PM; DATE:DECEMBER15, 2012
  • 2. INDEXA) BASICS OF NETWORKING1 HOW NETWORKING STARTED2 WHAT IS NETWORKING3 TYPES OF NETWORK & DIFFERENT TOPOLOGIES4 WHAT IS OSI LAYER & ITS FUNCTION5 IP ADDRESSINGB) DCS NETWORKS1 ABB SYMPHONY HARMONY DCS NETWORK2 SIEMENS TELEPERM ME DCS NETWORK
  • 3. Basics of NetworkingNetworking began its infancy in the mid -1960’s.by the US Department of Defence (DoD).The original intention of networking was beingdeveloped to withstand a nuclear war.Telephone networks were to vulnerable and wouldterminate all conversations should a nuclear waroccur.
  • 4. ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency)was created in response with the launching of theSputnik in 1957.ARPA decided that a DoD network should be packet-switched networked consisting of a subnet andhost computers.Experimental network research was awarded toUCLA, UCSB, SRI and Univ. of Utha in 1969. Theseareas were because they all had a large numberof ARPA contracts.Basics of Networking
  • 5. These 4 universities also had different and completelyincompatible host computers.ARPANET protocols were not suitable for running overmultiple networks, so TCP/IP model and protocolswere invented in 1974.ARPA awarded several other contracts and specificallyUniv.. of California at Berkeley to integrate theprotocols with the Berkeley UNIX.Basics of Networking
  • 6. Berkeley developed a convenient program interfaceto the network and wrote many applications, utility,and management programs to make networking easier.In it early infancy, the OSI protocols were crushed andthe TCP/IP protocols were already in widespread use.The OSI Model had seven layers because at the time,IBM had a propriety seven -layer protocol calledSNA (Systems Network Architecture).Basics of Networking
  • 7. At the time, IBM dominated the computer companiesand every was scared to death that IBM would useits clout to force everyone to use SNA.The OSI was to be produced like an IBM-referencemodel.The OSI model became the world standard and wasnot controlled by one company, but by a neutralorganization, ISO (International Standards Association).Basics of Networking
  • 8. Basics of NetworkingNETWORKING IS THE SHARING OFINFORMATION & SERVICES.COMPUTER NETWORKING PROVIDESTHE COMMUNICATION TOOLS TOALLOW COMPUTERS TO SHAREINFORMATION & ABILITIES
  • 9. TYPES OF NETWORKSLAN – LOCAL AREA NETWORK IS A SMALLGEOGRAPHICAL AREA SUCH AS OUR SCHOOLBOARD.MAN – METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORK IS ANETWORK OVER A LARGER GEOGRAPHICAL AREASUCH AS THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT.WAN – WIDE AREA NETWORK IS A NETWORK USEDOVER AN EXTREMELY LARGE GEOGRAPHICAL AREASUCH AS THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.Basics of Networking
  • 10. NETWORKS ARE BROKEN INTO 3 TOPOLOGIES.THEY ARE:•BUS TOPOLOGY•STAR TOPOLOGY•RING TOPOLOGYBasics of Networking
  • 11. BUS TOPOLOGY ALLOWS INFORMATION TO BEDIRECTED FROM ONE COMPUTER TO THE OTHER.LOTS OF BINARY COLLISION THOUGH.Basics of Networking
  • 12. STAR TOPOLOGY IS THE MOST COMMON TYPEUSED. ALL COMPUTERS ARE ATTACHED TO A HUB.LESS COLLISIONS AND MOST EFFICIENT.Basics of Networking
  • 13. RING TOPOLOGY- USES A TOKEN TO PASSINFORMATION FROM 1 COMPUTER TO THE OTHER.A TOKEN IS ATTACHED TO THE MESSAGE BY THESENDER TO IDENTIFY WHICH COMPUTER SHOULDRECEIVE THE MESSAGE. AS THE MESSAGE MOVESAROUND THE RING, EACH COMPUTER EXAMINESTHE TOKEN. IF THE COMPUTER IDENTIFIES THE TOKENAS ITS OWN, THEN IT WILL PROCESS THEINFORMATION.Basics of Networking
  • 14. A DISADVANTAGE OF A TOKEN RING IS IF ONECOMPUTER IS BROKEN OR DOWN, THE MESSAGECANNOT BE PASSED TO THE OTHER COMPUTERS.Basics of Networking
  • 15. The seven layers of the OSI Model are:Layer 1 PHYSICALLayer 2 DATA-LINKLayer 3 NETWORKLayer 4 TRANSPORTLayer 5 SESSIONLayer 6 PRESENTATIONLayer 7 APPLICATIONBasics of Networking
  • 16. THE PHYSICAL LAYERThe physical layeris concerned with transmittingraw bits overa communication channel thoughhubs, wires (cat5UTP), modems, networkcards…basically anything that is physical to the network.When looking at network cables, there are2 types that affect nodes. They are:In networking, computers are also known asHosts or Nodes.Basics of Networking
  • 17. •Straight through cables oralso known as patch cables•Cross-overcablesThe difference in the cables are the way the wiresare connected within the RJ45. I have attached asheet foryou in yourpackage.Basics of Networking
  • 18. Wiring:1-3 White/Orange2-6 Orange3-1 White/Green6-2 Green4-4 Blue5-5 White/Blue7-7 White/Brown8-8 BrownTypical CrossoverCableBasics of Networking
  • 19. TWISTED SHIELDED PAIR – USED IN PHONE LINES, NETWORKSUNSHIELDED TWISTED PAIR “ “ “ “COAXIAL CABLE – USED IN CABLEVISION GREAT FOR VIDEOFIBRE OPTIC CABLES - USES LIGHT TO CARRY SIGNAL BUTHARD TO WORK WITH AND LOOSES SIGNAL OVER LONGERDISTANCES( 2 TO 25 KM)COMMUNICATION CHANNELSBasics of Networking
  • 20. Crimping Tool HubBasics of Networking
  • 21. THE DATA-LINKLAYERThe data link layer takes raw transmission andtransform it into a line that appears free oftransmission errors in the network layer.The Data-LinkLayeralso is where you would findthe MAC Address. (Media Access Control). To find theMAC Address of yourcomputer, orany computer:Start/Programs/MS Prompt and type: ipconfig/allBasics of Networking"C:WINDOWS>" prompt, type "tracertwww.howstuffworks.com"
  • 22. THE DATA-LINKLAYERYou will also find smart devices such as switches inthe Data-LinkLayer.The digital information that needs to be sent such asand e-mail, attachments, etc needs to be broken intosmallerbits known as packets.These packets require some information similartosending a letterin the mail.Basics of Networking
  • 23. Hea der Tra iler (Footer)Conta ins : Conta ins :Ma c Address (if a va ila ble) Ma c Address (from your computer)IP Address (where its going) IP Address (where it ca me from)PACKETSBits ofinforma tionTHERE ARE A NUMBEROF PACKETS THAT WILLFOLLOWEACHOTHERTOTHE FINAL DESTINATION.Basics of Networking
  • 24. THE NETWORKLAYERThe network layer is concerned with controllingthe operation of the subnet. A ROUTER is used todetermining how packets are routed from sourceto destination.If one path is busy, then the routerwill select anotherpath forthe packets to travel. So really, the packetscan all have different paths and find theirway to thefinal destination.Basics of Networking
  • 25. THE NETWORKLAYERThe routerhas millions of IPaddressing built intothe software, and knows where to send the packets.IPstands forInternet Protocol and is basically anaddress that the packets will be sent to.An example would be 216.27.61.137Basics of Networking
  • 26. THE NETWORKLAYERIf you lookat the IPAddress, the numberare brokeninto different categories.216. 27.61.137Classification Hosts216. 27.61.137OctetsBasics of Networking
  • 27. Classifications can be broken into 3 classes. They are:Class A - Only the first octet is used foraddressing andthe balance used forhosts.Class B- The first two octet are used foraddressingand the balance used forhosts.Class C - The first three octet are used foraddressingand the balance used forhosts.Basics of Networking
  • 28. Every machine on the Internet has a uniqueidentifying number, called an IP Address.A typical IP address looks like this:216.27.61.137But computers communicate in binary form.Basics of Networking
  • 29. The same IP address in binary:11011000.00011011.00111101.10001001216.27.61.137Basics of Networking
  • 30. If you add all the positions together, you get 32,which is why IP addresses are considered32-bit numbersCombine the four octets and you get 232or a possible4,294,967,296 unique values.11011000.00011011.00111101.10001001Basics of Networking
  • 31. Class A - This class is for very large networks,such as a major international company might have.IP addresses with a first octet from 1 to 126 arepart of this class.Basics of NetworkingCLASS A (Private IP)FROM10.0.0.0 THROUGH10.255.255.255CLASS A (Public IP)FROM1.0.0.0 THROUGH126.0.0.0
  • 32. Class B- This class is used for medium-sized networks.A good example is a large college campus.IP addresses with a first octet from 128 to 191are part of this class. Class B addresses also includethe second octet as part of the Net identifier.Basics of NetworkingCLASS B(Private IP)FROM172.16.0.0 THROUGH172.31.255.255CLASS B(Public IP)FROM128.0.0.0 THROUGH191.0.0.0
  • 33. Class C - Class C addresses are commonly used forsmall to mid-size businesses. IP addresseswith a first octet from 192 to 223 are part of thisclass. Class C addresses also include the secondand third octets as part of the Net identifier.Basics of NetworkingCLASS C (Private IP)FROM192.168.0.0 THROUGH192.168.255.255CLASS C (Public IP)FROM192.0.0.0 THROUGH223.0.0.0
  • 34. Loopback- The IP address 127.0.0.1 is usedas the loopback address. This means that it isused by the host computer to send a messageback to itself.Basics of NetworkingLOOPBACKCLASS D(MULTICAST)FROM224.0.0.0 TO 239.0.0.0CLASS E (FORRESEARCH)FROM240.0.0.0 TO 255.0.0.0
  • 35. THE TRANSPORT LAYERThe transport layer “DIRECTS PACKETS”, splits it up intosmaller units if need be, pass these to the networkand ensure that the pieces are travelling in anorderly fashion.A series of protocols are also established in thislayerto ensure properflow of the packets.You can basically describe the Transport Layerasa “TRAFFIC COP”.Basics of Networking
  • 36. THE SESSION LAYERThe session layer allows different machines toestablish sessions between themselves.Once communications are established, encryptionthen begins both parties.Basics of Networking
  • 37. THE PRESENTATION LAYERThe Presentation Layer’s job is managing datastructures and converting from the representationused inside the computer to the network standardrepresentation an vice versa.In Otherterms, the Presentation layerbasicallytakes the packets and re-assembles them so you canopen the e-mail orthe attachment.If any packets got lost along the way, orweredamaged, then the Presentation layerwill send asign to the senderthat it requires the specific packet.Basics of Networking
  • 38. THE APPLICATION LAYERThe Application layer contains a variety of protocolsthat are commonly required.Another Application layer function is file transfer.Different file systems have different file namingconventions, different ways of representing text lines,and so on.Transferring a file between two different systemsrequires handling and other incompatibilities.Basics of Networking
  • 39. FTP - File Tra nsfer ProtocolFTP provides a sta ndard system for sendinga nd receiving files over IP networks.HTTP ProtocolWeb browsers a nd servers use the HypertextTra nsfer Protocol (HTTP) protocol tocommunica te.Electronic Ma il ProtocolsSevera l network protocols were developedspecifica lly to support electronic ma il over theInternet.THE APPLICATION LAYERBasics of Networking
  • 40. SO AP - Simple O bject AccessProtocolSO AP defines a sta nda rd wa y to encode objectswithin network pa ckets using XML.DHCPThe Dyna mic Host Configura tion Protocol(DHCP) supports a utoma tic a ddress a ssignmenta nd improved configura tion ma nagement of IPnetworks.THE APPLICATION LAYERBasics of Networking
  • 41. IPv6 - Internet Protocol version 6IPv6 promises to relieve the current IP a ddressshorta ge, a nd this new version of the protocolma y a lso increa se performa nce a nd improvea dministra tion ca pabilities.PPPoEThe Point to Point Protocol over Ethernet(PPPoE) sta ndard helps a ccess providersma na ge their broa dba nd service delivery, a ndit ca n a lso improve the ea se of use for DSL a ndca ble modem customers.THE APPLICATION LAYERBasics of Networking
  • 42. DCS NETWORKABB DCS PRESENT LAN CONFIGURATIONCON 5 CON 6 CON 2 CON 4CON 7SWITCH - 1 SWITCH - 2HNCC20_5HNCC20_4HNCCEWS
  • 43. DCS NETWORKABB DCS PREVIOUS LAN CONFIGURATIONCON 5 CON 6 CON 2 CON 4CON 7SWITCH - 1 SWITCH - 2HNCC20_4HNCCEWSHNCC20_5
  • 44. ABB DCS NETWORKPREVIOUS NETWORK DESIGNING WAS HAVINGDRAWBACK . THE HMI’S AVAILABILITY WAS COMPROMISEDIF THE PROBLEM OCCURS IN NETWORKDEVICE(SWITCHES).IN PRESENT NETWORK DESIGNING IT WAS RECTIFIED .THE HMI’S AVAILABILITY WAS ENHANCED IF THE PROBLEMOCCURS IN ANY NETWORK DEVICE(SWITCHES).WE HAVE ASSIGNED THE SERVER 20_4 & SERVER 20_5 TOSWITCHES 1 & 2. AND SWITCHES 1 & 2 AREINTERCONNECTED SO HMI’S AVAILABILITY IS MAXIMISED.
  • 45. DCS NetworkABBDCS NETWORKCONSIST OF 2 NETWORKS1.OPERATION NETWORK(O-NET)- RJ48 ETHERNET CAT-5E CABLESARE USED& SPEEDUPTO 10Mbps.2. COMMUNICATION NETWORK(C-NET)-IT IS UNIDIRECTIONAL,HIGHSPEEDSERIAL DATA NETWORKTHAT OPERATES AT10MHz COMMUNICATION RATE. IT SUPPORTS UPTO250DROPS ORNODES .3. HARMONY NETWORKCOMMUNICATION COUPLER(HNCC)-ITSERVES AS A GATEWAY BETWEEN O-NET & C-NET .
  • 46. ABBDCS NETWORKOPERATORSTATIONOPERATORSTATION/SERVERENGG.STATIONREDUNDANT DISTRIBUTEDCOMMUNICATION NETWORKCNetWHRB-2,3,4TG-2AFBC-1MARSHALLING RELAYFIELDPROCESS:ANALOG/DIGITALO-NetC-NetHNCC HNCCHNCC- HARMONY NETWORKCOMMUNICATION COUPLER
  • 47. DCS NetworkSIEMENS TELEPERMME DCSMMI132.147.160.124HUB132.147.160.1UNIXSERVER132.147.160.24PRINT SEVER132.147.160.224CGP DMPENGG. STATION132.147.160.50TX/RXCS275DATA HIGHWAYCGA01PROCESS:ANALOG/DIGITALSIGNALSREDUNDANT BUSOS220EAAS220EA
  • 48. SIEMENS DCS NetworkCS 275 BUS SYSTEM- It Permits Serial transmission ofdata between various participants (OS 220EA & AS 22OEA) connected toit. It works on token passing principle or the flying master function.Thisflying master principle means that the bus control is distrbuted amongst theparticipants instead of a central bus control.This result in higher availabilityof the bus system.NAT- It is interface module allows connection of Personal Computers to20m local bus of the CS275 bus subsystem.IRQ 10 is the default addressassign to NAT card on sco unix operating system.The cable from N-AT toTeleperm bus is 2.5m long.
  • 49. DCS NETWORKSTHANKS TO ALL OF YOU,KEEP SMILING UNTIL WEMEET HERE NEXT TIME &“ALWAYS BE IN GOODNETWORK”

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