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Writing to persuade communicatin skill
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Writing to persuade communicatin skill

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Writing to persuade communicatin skill

Writing to persuade communicatin skill

Published in: Education, Business

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Transcript

  • 1. Writing To Persuade
  • 2. THE BASIS OF PERSUASIVE SALES MESSAGES - IDENTIFYING OBJECTIVES
    • 1. What product or service is being promoted? (the subject)
        • What will the product do for the people concerned?
        • From what materials is it made?
        • By what process is it manufactured?
        • What are its superior design features?
        • What is its price?
        • What kind of servicing, if any, will it require?
  • 3. THE BASIS OF PERSUASIVE SALES MESSAGES - IDENTIFYING OBJECTIVES
    • 2. To whom is the message being directed? (the audience)
    • Who would buy this product?
    • Why would they buy it?
    • How frequently would the product be purchased?
    • How would the product be used?
    • Is this product a necessity or a luxury?
    • What do people like about it?
    • What do people dislike about it?
    • 3. What are the desired results? (the purpose)
  • 4. The basis of persuasive sales messages - organizing the message
    • Solicited sales letters Vs Unsolicited letters
    • Getting the readers’ Attention.(A)
    • Introducing the product and arousing Interest in it.  (I)
    • Generating Desire for the product through convincing evidence. (D)
    • Encouraging Action. (A)
  • 5. First Paragraph: An Attention-Getter (A)
    • Do’s
    • A solution to a problem
    • A startling announcement
    • A what-if opening
    • An outstanding feature of the product
    • A gift
    • Don’t
    • Avoid asking foolish questions
  • 6. Introducing the product and arousing Interest in it.  (I)
    • Start with the product.
        • Focus on a central selling feature.
        • Address the reader’s needs .
        • Keep paragraphs short .
    • Introducing the Product
        • Be natural and cohesive
        • Be action oriented .
        • Stress the central selling point
  • 7. Generating Desire for the product through convincing evidence. (D)
    • Convince the Readers with Evidence
        • Use concrete language .
        • Be objective
        • Interpret the evidence.
        • Be careful when you talk about price .
          • Introduce price later
          • Don’t mention it first & last para
          • Use figures to illustrate how enough money can be saved
          • State price in terms of small units. 
          • If practical, invite comparison
          • Use sentence that mentions the price to remind about the benefits
  • 8. Last Paragraph: Motivating the Reader to Action
    • State the specific action wanted;
    • Refer to the reward for taking action in the same sentence in which action is encouraged;
    • Present the action as being easy to take;
    • Provide some stimulus for quick action; and
    • Ask confidently for action.
  • 9. Claim letters and requests for favors
    • Making a Claim
    • Claim letters are often routine because the basis for the claim is a guarantee or some other assurance that an adjustment will be made without requiring persuasion.
    • writing inductively (to reduce the chance of a negative reaction), and
    • stressing an appeal throughout the letter (to emphasize an incentive for taking favorable action).
  • 10. Claim letters and requests for favors
    • Asking a Favor
    • Occasionally, everyone has to ask someone for a favor - action for which there is not much reward, time, or inclination.
    • Begins on a point that is related and of interest to the receiver.
    • presents benefits that help to increase the reader’s enthusiasm for the proposal.
    • Seeks specific action.
  • 11. The collection series
    • Remember
      • Customers know what they owe (detailed information is not necessary)
      • They expect to be asked for payment (no need for an attention-getter and no need for an apology)
      • Letter should be short, its main point (pay is expected) stands out vividly
  • 12. Characteristics of effective collection letters
    • Timeliness
    • Regularity
    • Understanding
    • Increasing stringency
  • 13. Stages in the Collection-Letter Series
    • 1) Reminder,
    • 2) Inquiry,
    • 3) Appeal,
        • Fair play
        • Closure
        • Pride
        • Fear
    • 4) Strong appeal or urgency
    • To develop the strong appeal from the mild appeal
    • 5) Ultimatum