Retention of employees @ pharmaceutical industry project report mba markting
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Retention of employees @ pharmaceutical industry project report mba markting

Retention of employees @ pharmaceutical industry project report mba markting

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Retention of employees @ pharmaceutical industry project report mba markting Retention of employees @ pharmaceutical industry project report mba markting Document Transcript

  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Executive Summary The pharmaceutical industry spends billions of dollars annually on gifts tophysicians often these gifts consist of items that are designed to enhance patient care (e.g.,anatomical oodles) or learning (e.g., textbooks), but gifts may also be of a more personalnature (e.g., vent tickets). Serious ethical concerns have been raised that gifts from thepharmaceutical industry to individual health care professionals risk compromising healthcare providers’ professional objectivity and integrity, and/or undermining theirfundamental ethical commitment to putting the interests of patients first. This reportdiscusses the special nature of gift relationships, examines why gifts to health careprofessionals from the pharmaceutical industry may be ethically problematic, and reviewsprofessional ethical guidelines and legal standards regarding acceptance of gifts.Project report on :- “Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry”Objectives: 1. To study on Employee satisfactions level in lake chemical industry pvt ltd in Bangalore 2. To know job satisfaction level existing employee in industry. 3. To Know the authority and responsibility of the industry. 4. To know the relationship between company and employee BABASAB PATIL 1
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryResearch Methodology:Data Source : Primary Data (Field Survey) Secondary data-InternetArea of Research : BangaloreResearch approach : Survey methodResearch Instrument : QuestionnaireSample Plan : Personal Interview.Sampling method : SPSS student version softwareSample size : 100 Respondents BABASAB PATIL 2
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Findings:  In company the coordination is very good between the employees and management.  In the company the employee satisfaction with there job.  The mutual coordination between the members in company.  The rewards systems are in the company is very piece rate system  The company has giving equal wages to the employee.  The company recognition of sincere efforts to motivate the employee in organization.  The present working condition is very good in lake chemical industry.  The employees have facing problem with decision making process to progress there company.Suggestions:  The company has focus on giving extra security to employee in inside the organization  The company having aware of exact goals of there industry.  To motivate employee the company having giving extra benefit to improve Working condition in company.CONCLUSION: Assessment of overall performance of the pharmaceutical firms, asperceived by research sample, was relatively high;, only learning/ growth/ innovationdimension got an assessment below high level. Performance measures which were assesseda little below high level were:¨ Resources acquisition and utilization¨ Employees’ satisfaction¨ attracting new customers BABASAB PATIL 3
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry¨ introducing new policies, strategies, etcOnly one performance indicator was below the mean of the scale (3); that was“development of new production methods”.Research findings indicated rather strong positive relationship between Employee andorganization performance at Lake chemical firms.Introduction: Lake Chemicals was established in 1992 in association with Micro lab Group (thefastest growing company among the top 20 companies in India as per the ORG rating).Lake primarily intends to capture the specialized quality Bulk Drugs market and envisagesan enormous growth prospect in India and across the world. Lake Chemicals Pvt Ltd, aBangalore based company situated in the southern part of India, popularly known asSilicon Valley of Asia. Lake is a leading manufacturer of psychotic API’s & itsintermediates. Lake is highlighted on the market as one of the major producers ofBenzodiazepine series. Lake has grown a long way to have a good presence in regulatedmarkets. Lake intents to achieve a stronghold in the US & other regulated markets likeEurope, Australia etc. Lake is gearing up for a US FDA approval for its range ofBenzodiazepine series and has filed CTD to various health authorities of Europe and is in afinal process of submission to EDQM. Lake has Global presence in Singapore, HongKong,Brazil,andalsoIsrael.Lake has considerable strengths and a growing presence in the worlds key pharmaceuticalmarkets, equipped for product development with complex chemistry, a talented anddedicated workforce and a leading portfolio of products with many more in the pipeline.Lake continues to ensure that we have the right resources to produce the right quality of theniche products and projects that we have underway or will be bringing on board. Over thenext few years, we intend to build on our strengths and launch successful products byconstant researching to develop new products that deliver significant value to mankind.Lake’s accomplishments over the past few years speak a great volume about its talentedteam of employees, who have firmly embraced the Companys vision. Growth is due to themanagement guidance & team contributionswith an ongoing support from both ends. BABASAB PATIL 4
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryLake Chemicals Pvt Ltd, a Bangalore based company situated in the southern part of India,popularly known as Silicon Valley of Asia. Lake is a leading manufacturer of psychoticAPI’s & its intermediates. Lake is highlighted on the market as one of the major producersof Benzodiazepine series.Our vision  To become a more globally focused and integrated company with a number of successful API to meet the needs of regulated markets like US, Europe & AustraliaSilent feature:  Lake is a WHO GMP certified facility.  Having a finished goods handling area with a class 1,00,000 air handling.  We have been awarded the export house status based on our export performance by the Govt. of India.  Possesses a sophisticated manufacturing facility as we are gearing-up to enter the US Market in the near future  Registered at international recognized DUN & Bradstreet D&B D-U-N- S#65-047-6559.  Exporting to about 30 countries including regulated and non-regulated markets  Lake Intends to file CTD of 5 products to EQQM for grant of COS in the near future  An approved source of a couple of products [Lorazepam - Wyeth , Haloperidol- Searle & Clonazepam- (Roche- through Nicholas Primal )] by the originators for local & unregulated market supply  Facility is built as per ICH guidelines with a focus to get into the US market with the Benzodiazepine range of products BABASAB PATIL 5
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry  Equipped with an in-house jet-mill and can offer micro ionized grade with the finest particle size of 100% less than 10 microns OGANISATIOZATION PROFILE: Health care professionals who prescribe pharmaceutical products base theirprescription decisions on many factors including effectiveness, safety, and cost. In an effortto influence practitioners’ prescribing practices, the pharmaceutical industry employs diversemarketing and promotional strategies, among them offers of free drug samples, educationalmaterials, meals, and other forms of gifts. These efforts are both intensive and expensive. In2001 the drug industry spent more than $16 billion on visits to physicians’ offices. In the lastfive years the number of pharmaceutical company sales representatives in the U.S. hasincreased from 42,000 to 88,000.1 Some 80% of physicians report having been offered cashor gifts from pharmaceutical industry representatives.2 Many physicians meet withpharmaceutical industry representatives four or more times per month.3 Serious ethicalconcerns have been raised about these contacts between the pharmaceutical industry andindividual health care professionals, especially when gifts are involved.4-9 The practice ofaccepting gifts from pharmaceutical industry representatives risks compromising health careproviders’ professional objectivity and integrity, and undermining their fundamental ethicalcommitment to putting the interests of patients first. Gift incentives to participate incontinuing professional education programs are the wrong incentives for health careprofessionals and trainees, who should be independently motivated to participate in lifelonglearning.7 And there are economic consequences when the costs of gifts are passed along topatients, health care institutions, and third-party payers in the form of higher prices for drugs.Escalating drug costs may ultimately result in limitations on access to care. Federalregulations (at 5 CFR, Part 2635) establish standards for conduct in relation to gifts for allfederal employees. But anecdotal reports from the field indicate that beyond these mandatedthresholds, local facilities’ policies about accepting gifts from the pharmaceutical industryvary widely within VHA. To address this state of affairs, new national policy limits theaccess representatives of the pharmaceutical industry may have to facilities and staff.* Thisnational guidance provides a foundation for the development of more uniform local policies BABASAB PATIL 6
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrythroughout the system. This report by the VHA National Ethics Committee examines thevalues at stake in relationships between practitioners and the pharmaceutical industry fromthe perspective of health care ethics. Its goal is to clarify the philosophical and professionalconcerns that underlie regulations and policy in this area. The report addresses gifts providedto individual health care professionals by representatives of the pharmaceutical industry.Often these gifts consist of items that are designed to enhance patient care (e.g., reflexhammers, anatomical models) or learning (e.g., meals at educational events, textbooks), butgifts may also be of a more personal nature (e.g., organizers, event tickets). The promotionalnature of gifts may be subtle or obvious, depending on, for example, whether a sponsor orproduct name is prominently displayed. For this report gifts are distinguished from purelypromotional items that have no intrinsic value to the recipient (e.g., product brochures) andfrom compensation for professional work (e.g., honoraria). The report discusses thedefinition of gifts, examines why gifts to health care professionals from the pharmaceuticalindustry may be ethically problematic in the health care setting, and reviews professionalethical guidelines and legal standards regarding acceptance of gifts. It offers practicalrecommendations to guide ethical policy within VHA. Although the analysis andrecommendations offered here were developed specifically in reference to gifts frompharmaceutical representatives, they apply equally to gifts from representatives of medicalmanufacturers Gifts provided to institutions are beyond the scope of this report.* What Is aGift? Webster defines a gift as: “something bestowed voluntarily and withoutcompensation.”12 Although this definition captures our casual understanding of a gift assomething given with no expectation that the recipient will reciprocate, it misses much of thesocial aspect of gifts that make gifts from pharmaceutical representatives to health careprofessionals ethically challenging. Gifts “have deep and sometimes contradictory culturalmeanings.”13 Unlike contracts, in which parties set out clear, explicit expectations, giftsplace people in binding personal relationships that generate vague, open-ended moralobligations. The importance of a gift lies in the personal relationship it generates, sustains,and signifies.14 Why Are Gifts Ethically Problematic? Because gifts create relationships,health care professionals’ acceptance of gifts from the pharmaceutical industry can beethically problematic in several ways. Accepting gifts risks undermining trust. It may biasclinicians’ judgments about the relative merits of different medications. And it may affect BABASAB PATIL 7
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryprescribing patterns in ways that increase costs and adversely affect access to care.Undermining Patient & Public Trust. Health care professionals’ fiduciary, or trust-based,relationship with patients requires that practitioners explain the reasons for treatmentdecisions and disclose any potential conflicts of interest, including the influence of gifts. Onestudy asked patients and physicians to rate how appropriate it would be for a physician toaccept gifts (ranging from pens to trips) from the pharmaceutical industry, and whether theythought accepting gifts would influence the physician’s behavior.15 With the exception ofdrug samples, the patients considered gifts to be more influential than did the physicians.Almost half of the patients who participated had not been aware that physicians received giftsfrom pharmaceutical companies—and of those, 24% said that this new knowledge changedtheir perception of the medical profession. Similarly, a telephone survey of patients foundthat although 82% of respondents were aware that physicians received “office-use gifts” fromthe pharmaceutical industry, only about one-third were aware that physicians receivedpersonal gifts.16 Forty-two percent believed that personal gifts adversely affect both the costand the quality of health care. On the basis of such data, the American College of Physicianshas concluded that “[a] significant number of patients believe that industry gifts bias theirphysician’s prescribing practices and ultimately drive up medical costs.”17 Public awarenessthat health care professionals accept gifts from pharmaceutical representatives mayundermine trust in the profession and lead to a perceived loss of professional integrity. VHAis a public agency and public service is considered a public trust. Consequently, the publicrightly hold VHA to a higher ethical standard than they do private companies. As federalemployees, health professionals appointed to VHA have an obligation to ensure that citizenscan have completeBrief history of lake chemicals:The Mill Brook sub watershed and the Blackstone River Headwaters have been identified bythe Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs as key priority areas to improvewater quality within the Blackstone River. The Blackstone River has been designated as aNational and American Heritage River by the National Park Service. The Blackstone RiverValley National Heritage Corridor was designated by an Act of Congress on November 10,1986 to preserve and interpret for present and future generations the unique and significant BABASAB PATIL 8
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryvalue of the Blackstone Valley. In August 1998, President Clinton declared the BlackstoneRiver an "American Heritage River". The National Park Service, two state governments,dozens of local municipalities, businesses, nonprofit historical and environmentalorganizations, educational institutions, many private citizens, and a unifying commission allwork together in partnerships to protect the Valleys special identity and prepare for its future.Indian Lake is the largest body of water located completely within the City of Worcester,Massachusetts (population of 170,000+). The 193-acre Lake with a mean depth ofapproximately 10 feet offers many family activities including two public swimming beaches,picnic and recreation areas, a public boat launch and a tennis court. Indian Lake originallyencompassed 40 acres and was surrounded by marshes and farmland. In the late 1820s duringthe industrial era, the Blackstone Canal was built to create a new transportation link betweenWorcester, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island. The Mill Brook was dammed atIndian Lake to form the headwaters of the Blackstone Canal and Blackstone River to controlthe flow of water through the canal. In the late 1840s the Lake was used to harvest ice forlocal businesses. The Upper Mill Brook Watershed area is approximately 15 square miles andextends northerly into Holden. The main outlet from Indian Lake flows through a gated valvein a southerly direction into Salisbury Pond and eventually into the Blackstone River. Thewatershed area is heavily urbanized and the major tributary entering into the Lake is AraratBrook entering at the northwest corner of the Lake.Over the past 50 years, development within the watershed has increased dramatically whichhas caused increased water quality problems at Indian Lake and its tributaries and inlets. Thisdevelopment has attributed to rapid sedimentation from both upstream development andurban runoff. High phosphorous loading has also led to eutrophication and has resulted insevere impairment of water quality, primarily in the form of low dissolved oxygen, nuisanceaquatic plants, turbidity and organic enrichment. This has been documented in numerousstudies and routine water quality monitoring conducted by the Indian Lake WatershedAssociation (ILWA) through the Blackstone Headwater Monitoring Team (BHMT) Programand by the City Department of Public Health (DPH). BABASAB PATIL 9
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryExisting conditions have substantially reduced the recreational potential of the Indian Lake. In1978 the Indian Lake Improvement Association was formed and in 1985, the ILWA wasincorporated as a non-profit 501(3c). The organization began as a group of concernedresidents who wanted to monitor and revive the water body and has grown to be one of thestrongest neighborhood groups in the City of Worcester, working in cooperation with bothcity officials and residents to combat the effects of development within the watershed. TheILWA now maintains a membership of 300+ members.The ILWA has completed many major tasks to protect and restore the quality of the Lake inthe recent years. These tasks include: sewered homes along Indian Lake, dredged a portion ofIndian Lake; lobbied against major land taking for construction of Rte 190, lobbied City torepair sewer pumping station on Holden Street, periodic treatment of Indian Lake withchemicals to control weeds; construction of Morgan Park; completion of diagnostic feasibilitystudies of both lakes; coordination of the stenciling of almost 1,500 storm drains, whichultimately discharge into the waterbodies; gained support from the City for an annualdrawdown of Indian Lake to combat weed growth; successfully lobbied City to pave a localroadway and long stretch of sidewalk that washed sediment into Indian Lake during rainevents; worked with the City to repair a failing septic system at Shore Park, located on IndianLake, coordinated funding weed control of 80% of Indian Lake to control weed and algaegrowth, and continuously identify and repair numerous illicit sanitary/storm sewerconnections entering Salisbury Pond. The ILWA meets several times per year to discuss on-going issues and projects. The ILWA also keeps its membership of 300+ informed ofimportant events through the distribution of a semi-annual newsletter and provides importantevent, project status and educational information. BABASAB PATIL 10
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryEQUIPMENT Equipment Moc no’s Capacity Reactor SS 316 1 600 L Reactor SS 316 2 1100 L Reactor GLR 1 630 L Reactor GLR 2 1000 L Reactor GLR 2 1600 L Reactor SS 316 1 1600 L Reactor SS 316 2 150 L Centrifuge SS 316 4 24" Centrifuge SS 316 1 36" Centrifuge Rubber lined 2 36" Fluid bed drier SS 316 1 60 Kgs Tray Drier Ms 3 48 Trays Tray Drier(GMP SS 316 2 48 Trays model) Multimillion(GM SS 316 1 0.5mm P model) Sparkler SS 316 2 11 plates Filter(GMP model) Micropulveriser SS 316 3 11 plates BABASAB PATIL 11
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryBABASAB PATIL 12
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry NAME Nos. MAKE HPLC 1 Waters UV Spectrophotometer 1 Shimadzu Gas chromatogram 2 Shimadzu FTIR 1 Shimadzu Electronic Balance 2 Shimadzu Humidity Chamber 1 C.M. Equipments HPLC 2 ShimadzuBABASAB PATIL 13
  • MAJOR UTILITY EQUIPMENTS (GMP EQUIPMENT) Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Equipment MOC Nos Capacity S.S.Reactor SS 316 3 1500 L GLR Reactor SS 316 2 1500 L Centrifuge SS 316 2 36 “ Multimill SS 316 2 Vacuum Tray Dryer SS 316 2 12 Trays Octagonal Blender SS 316 2 400 L Sifter SS 316 2 30“ Sparkler Filter(GMP model) SS 316 2BABASAB PATIL 11 plates 14
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryBABASAB PATIL 15
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Equipment Capacity Nos Make BOILER 400 KGS 1 Thermax BOILER 600 KGS 1 Thermax THERMOPACK 100 KGS 1 Thermax CHILLING PLANT 40 TONS 1 Voltas GENERATOR 125 KVA 1 Powerica GENERATOR 185 KVA 1 Powerica COOLING TOWER 60 TONS 1 Paharpur ACID SCRUBBER 3000 CFM 1 Neptune Apex AIR HANDLING UNIT 3 Engineering VACCUM PUMP 80M3/HR 5 Joyam AIR COMPRESSOR 100 CFM 1 Ingersoll AIR COMPRESSOR 30 CFM 2 Ingersoll D. M. WATER PLANT 70 M3 Ion ExchangeBABASAB PATIL 16
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryCHARTER OF THE EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT ANDRETENTION COMMITTEE OF MEDICIS PHARMACEUTICALCORPORATION:This Employee Development and Retention Committee Charter was adopted by the Boardof Directors (the “Board”) of Medicis Pharmaceutical Corporation (the “Company”) onJuly 9, 2006.I. PurposeThe purpose of the Employee Development and Retention Committee (the “Committee”)of the Board of the Company is to review and provide guidance concerning the recruiting,hiring, training, promotion and retention of employees and managers.In addition to the powers and responsibilities expressly delegated to the Committee in thisCharter, the Committee may exercise any other powers and carry out any other BABASAB PATIL 17
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryresponsibilities delegated to it by the Board from time to time consistent with theCompany’s bylaws. The powers and responsibilities delegated by the Board to theCommittee in this Charter or otherwise shall be exercised and carried out by theCommittee as it deems appropriate without requirement of Board approval, and anydecision made by the Committee (including any decision to exercise or refrain fromexercising any of the powers delegated to the Committee hereunder) shall be at theCommittee’s sole discretion. While acting within the scope of the powers andresponsibilities delegated to it, the Committee shall have and may exercise all the powersand authority of the Board. To the fullest extent permitted by law, the Committee shallhave the power to determine which matters are within the scope of the powers andresponsibilities delegated to it.II. MembershipThe Board will appoint the members of the Committee. There will be a minimum of twomembers of the Committee. Each member of the Committee will be a non-managementmember of the Board.III. Meetings and ProceduresThe Chairperson (or in his or her absence, a member designated by the Chairperson) shallpreside at each meeting of the Committee and set the agendas for Committee meetings.The Committee shall have the authority to establish its own rules and procedures for noticeand conduct of its meetings so long as they are not inconsistent with any provisions of theCompany’s bylaws that are applicable to the Committee. BABASAB PATIL 18
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryThe Committee shall meet at least one time per year and more frequently as the Committeedeems necessary or desirable.All non-management directors who are not members of the Committee may attend andobserve meetings of the Committee, but shall not participate in any discussion ordeliberation unless invited to do so by the Committee, and in any event shall not be entitledto vote. The Committee may, at its discretion, include in its meetings members of theCompany’s management, any personnel employed or retained by the Company or anyother persons whose presence the Committee believes to be necessary or appropriate.Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Committee may also exclude from its meetings anypersons it deems appropriate.The Committee shall have the sole authority, as it deems appropriate, to retain and/orreplace, as needed, any independent counsel, consultants and other outside experts oradvisors as the Committee believes to be necessary or appropriate. The Committee mayalso utilize the services of the Company’s regular legal counsel or other advisors to theCompany. The Company shall provide for appropriate funding, as determined by theCommittee in its sole discretion, for payment of compensation to any such persons retainedby the Committee.The Chair shall report to the Board following meetings of the Committee and as otherwiserequested by the Chairman of the Board.IV. Duties and Responsibilities1. The Committee shall, at least annually, review the employee recruitment, hiring,development, promotion and retention policies of the Company.2. Through an interactive process with the Company’s senior management and itsHuman Resources Department, provide oversight and guidance on issues including but notlimited to employee recruiting, hiring & promotions, training & development, employee BABASAB PATIL 19
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryrelations, work-life issues, diversity, inclusion issues, retention practices, and similarmatters with the goal of increasing employee retention and satisfaction.3. To address specific issues or problems relating to employee relations and retentionthat may arise with the objective of identifying which procedures or policies need beenhanced, changed or discarded and to ensure that senior management has a timely andreasonable action plan to address the issue or problem.4. The Committee shall evaluate its own performance on an annual basis, including itscompliance with this Charter, and provide any written material with respect to suchevaluation to the Board, including any recommendations for changes in procedures orpolicies governing the Committee. The Committee shall conduct such evaluation andreview in such manner as it deems appropriate. The Committee shall review and reassessthis Charter at least annually and submit any recommended changes to the Board for itsconsideration.V. Delegation of DutiesThe Committee may delegate its responsibilities under this Charter to a subcommitteecomprised of one or more members of the Committee. The creation of such asubcommittee, as well as its purpose, will be reported to the Board of Directors. TheCommittee will also carry out such duties that may be delegated to it by the Board.Retinas-Employee Retention News: BABASAB PATIL 20
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Retensa is proud to be the company keeping you current on employeeretentiontrends,turnovertools,andtalentmanagementtactics.Feb: Department of Small Business Services Invites Retinas to Speak at BusinessSurvival Conference of 175 attendees The NYC Department of Small Business ServicesFlatiron BID invites Chanson Hecht, employee specialist, to speak with conferenceattendees on workforce issues in an uncertain business environment. Real world scenariosand solutions will be addressed at the Feb 25th event, such as how to reduce employeecosts without reducing productivity and what are the viable alternatives to layoffs.Organizational Development Network Invites Retensa to Diversity PanelJan Retensaconsultant, Barbara Vigilante, was invited by the Organizational Development Network totake part in a panel on diversity and inclusion. Topics such as the role of diversity in talentmanagement and leading practices in designing, promoting and implementing diversityinitiatives will be discussed at the February 10th event.Retensa presents the Top 10 "Biggest Quits" list of 2008 Retensa presents the fourth annual review of the most the most impactresignations of the year. 2008 was a year remembered for change. For some, change iswelcome. For others, it casts uncertainty. Stability is the new currency, so this years list ofbiggestRetention Programs to Retain Pharmaceutical Employees:State of the Industry: In the highly regulated Pharmaceutical Industry, jobs have become more stressfuland complicated. Fierce competition has driven salaries higher and higher and benefitsmust be constantly improved. Although the Pharmaceutical Industry has lower turnoverrates compared to other industries, the cost of turnover is much greater. With strictregulations and rigid timelines, a research specialists resignation leaves your company BABASAB PATIL 21
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrywith a delay in product development and a loss of talent. Additionally, when apharmaceutical representative leaves, they take the client relationships with them. Thesestringent regulations leave employee actions vulnerable to repercussions from their boss,the government, and sometimes even the media making retaining talented employeesinvaluable.How Can Retinas Help? In order to retain your employees and reduce turnover, aproactive approach is critical. Retensa can help your Pharmacy organization achieve thesegoals by constructing an employee retention strategy according to your companysstrengths, weaknesses, budget, and goals. Recruiting, hiring, On Boarding, and training areespecially important in the Pharmaceutical Industry. An analysis using our EmergentEmployee Life Cycle can give you an accurate picture of what current processes aresuccessful and which ones are not as effective as they could be. Retensa creates an actionplan with clear recommendations for improvement based on these findings. We also useexit interviews and employee engagement surveys to learn why employees leave yourcompany and what you can do to better retain them.Costumer focus: • To Satisfy our customers needs and expectations • To Make commitments we fully understand and believe we can meet • To Meet all commitments to customers on timePerformance Driven:  To Verify that our products and services meet agreed requirements  To Monitor, benchmark and continuously improve our business, products, services, organization and employees performance  To Provide best service backup for our customers BABASAB PATIL 22
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryCommitment to Quality:Quality values are internalized at every level of the organization. Our approach tocommunicating and implementing these values is one of encouragement, education andtraining rather than making policies. Ongoing education and individual support provideemployees with the tools, confidence, and motivation they need to implement qualityphilosophy.Through a quality training program, employees will learn, both the importance of qualityand how to measure it and a commitment to continually improving the quality andreliability of Lake’s products and services. We work to offer a very low impurity profile inour products.About pharmaceutical promotion: General Practitioner in Willunga, a village 50 km south of Adelaide, South Australiapaid one day per week. Lecturer in the Discipline of General Practice, University ofAdelaide paid one day per week. My duties include developing a Treatment DecisionEducation Collaboration (TDEC)• National Institute of Clinical Studies (NICS) Fellow 2.5 days per week. My project is todevelop a website to assist GPs to evaluate the usefulness of drug promotion compared toTherapeutic Guidelines.• Director, Healthy Skepticism Inc unpaid. Healthy Skepticism is an international non-profit organization with the main aim of improving health by reducing harm frommisleading drug promotion. I am currently on a 23 city tour of Europe and the USA fromApril 20 – June 25, 2008 with stops in these cities:Helsinki, Manchester, Leeds, London, Oxford, Berlin, Verona, Glasgow, Belfast, Geneva,Lausanne, Madrid,Köln, Mainz, Washington, Boston / Pawtucket, Chicago, New York, BABASAB PATIL 23
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrySeattle, San Francisco / Davis, Hobart I am much obliged [old fashioned English for“thank you”] to my major sponsors:• IQWiG [German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care]• SSMI [Swiss Society of Internal Medicine]Why is drug promotion a difficult topic? Understanding drug promotion is not rocket science. It is a much more complicatedand difficult topic. Understanding drug promotion requires understanding insights frommany different fields of study. The more I learn from these anyfields the more I realize that I have much more to learn. The useful fields of study include:• Medicine and Pharmacy– Pharmacology, Epidemiology, Public Health, Evidence Based Medicine, DrugEvaluation,Pharmacovigilance• Social sciences– Psychology, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, Management, History, Politics,Communication Studies• Humanities– Logic, Ethics, Rhetoric, Epistemology, Linguistics, Semiotics, Literature, Art, Religion• Professions– Marketing, Public Relations, Education, Advocacy, Regulation Policing, Law,Accounting• StatisticsBecause drug promotion is so complex this paper can only be a quick introductioncovering only the tip of the iceberg. I will have to simplify many complex issues. Iapologize for any misunderstandings or distortion that may result. The understanding ofdrug promotion is also complex and difficult for the following reasons:• The greatest obstacle to discovering the truth is being convinced that you already know it.Many doctors believe that they all ready know everything they need to know about drugpromotion so they are not open to reconsidering their beliefs.Peter Mansfield: Healthy Skepticism about pharmaceutical promotion page 2 BABASAB PATIL 24
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry• Because we swim in a see of promotion we don’t notice it, just like fish may not noticethe water that they swim in.• The issues are not black and white.• The conclusions from psychological research about persuasion do not fit well with thecurrent belief systems of many health professionals. Many reject these conclusions becausethey feel wrong or difficult to believe without assessing the strength of the evidence. Thistendency of people to reject facts if they feel that they are implausible was known by theancients. Plato who attributed the following quote to Socrates discussing sophistry: “Incourts of justice no attention is paid whatever to the truth… all that matters is plausibility...both prosecution and defense positively suppress the facts in favour of probability, if thefacts are improbable. Never mind the truth -- pursue probability through thick and thin inevery kind of speech; the whole secret of the art of speaking lies in consistent adherence tothis principle.” (Plato, Phaedrus 272). Thucydides wrote that "When someone finds aconclusion agreeable, they accept it without argument, but when they finds it disagreeable,they will bring against it all the forces of logic and reason." Modern psychologists callthese tendencies“confirmation bias”.• Many health professionals perceive any discussion of drug promotion to be a threat totheir freedom to choosefor themselves what to do, including whether or not to accept gifts from drug companies.Psychologicalresearch has found that threats to freedom often elicit reactance. Reactance is an emotionalreaction againstthreats to freedom or pressure to change. Reactance can cause people to adopt orstrengthen views contrary towhat was intended.What is promotion? Promotion can be defined as persuasion with the aim or effect of increasing ordecreasing the use, sales or acceptance of a product, service or idea. Promotion is a subsetof marketing. The 3 other main components of marketing are: developing the product, BABASAB PATIL 25
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrypricing and distribution or placement. Thus the 4 Ps of marketing are: product, price,promotion and place. Promotion includes many methods: advertising, sales representatives,gifts, samples, sponsorship, public relations etc.Do we think we are influenced? Many studies around the world have found similar results to a study by Steinman etal (2001). When they asked young US physicians: “How much influence do salesrepresentatives have on your prescribing?” the answers were: 61% none;38% a little and1% a lot. It seems that the majority of us are confident that we are completely or nearlycompletely invulnerable to promotion. However we are not so confident about ourcolleagues. When asked “How much influence do sales representatives have on otherphysicians’ prescribing?” the answers were: 16% none; 33% a little and 51% a lot.1 have Itis very common for humans to believe that they are at lower risk of harm than otherpeople. Psychologists call this the illusion of unique invulnerability. Consequently if youthink you not vulnerable to being misled by drug promotion you are in the majority.However, there is also evidence that this illusion increases vulnerability. Overconfidenceincreases vulnerability because it reduces the motivation to think carefully aboutpersuasive messages so they are less likely to be rejected.2 One of the main reasons whydoctors are overconfident is that they believe that their high intelligence is an adequateprotection. Recently, an Australian national GP leader for denied that doctors were beadversely influenced by drug promotion. His main justification for this denial was that:“Doctors have the intelligence to evaluate information from a clearly biased source.”3However intelligence is a risk factor for overconfidence and overconfidence is the mainrisk factor for being vulnerable to misleading promotion. For example, a study of internetfraud has found that “clever people are easier to con… To do the bigger scams you needthe victims to trust their own capabilities and experience… A significant number of high-loss cases involved specialists such as psychiatrists, psychologists and neuro-surgeons.”4Are we influenced? Pharmaceutical industry staff believe that drug promotion is effective becausethey see sales change soon after promotional activities occur. In 1964 advertising companyexecutive Pierre Garai disclosed that: “As an advertising man, I can assure you that BABASAB PATIL 26
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryadvertising which does not work does not continue to run. If experience did not showbeyond Peter Mansfield: Healthy Skepticism about pharmaceutical promotion page 3doubt that the great majority of doctors are splendidly responsive to current [prescriptiondrug] advertising, new techniques would be devised in short order.”5Pharmaceutical companies have a legal obligation to invest money only where it is mostlikely to provide the highest return on investment. In many countries they have been themost profitable of all industries for most of the past 100 years. They only invest inpromotional activities where they have good reason to believe are likely to increase pricesand/or sales volumes. They would not invest in promotion if it did not work on average toprovide high returns on investment. Drug companies spend huge amounts on promotion inmost countries. They may spend more in the USA but that is the only country wherereliable expenditure data is available. “Pharmaceutical promotion in the United States in2004 is as high as $57.5 billion… Excluding direct-to-consumers advertising andpromotion towards pharmacists, the industry spent around $61,000 in promotion perpracticing physician… As a percent of U.S. domestic sales of $ 235.4 billion, promotionconsumes 24.4% of the sales dollar versus 13.4% for R&D.”6 The following graph showsthe volume of prescribing of drug A in a hospital in northern USA. The doctors in thathospital were asked if they were influenced by drug promotion. They denied it. Initially thelevel of prescribing was low. It increased when the doctors received an invitation to an allexpenses paid seminar about the drug in a resort in Florida. The level of prescribingdropped while the doctors were away at the seminar then increased even more after theygot back.7 Perhaps the initial level of prescribing was too low and the post promotion levelwas more appropriate. The main point here is that doctors who believed that they were notinfluenced were in fact influenced. Observational evidence such as this study is not asconclusive as randomized controlled trials. However the industry has millions of salesgraphs similar to this one.Are we vulnerable to being misled? I am a member of a team doing a systematic review of studies that havemeasured doctors’ exposure to promotion and measured the quality of prescribing andanalyzed the relationship between those two measures. So far we have found 7 BABASAB PATIL 27
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrystudies -1. Andersen M, Kragstrup J, Sondergaard J. How conducting a clinical trial affectsphysicians guideline adherence and drug preferences. JAMA. .2. Aubrey L., Hensgen F., Sermet C. La diffusion de l’innovation pharmaceutique enmedicine liverale: revue dela literature et premiers resultants francais. Bulletind’information en economies de la sante.3. Becker MH, Stolley PD, Lasagna L, McEvilla JD, Sloane LM. Differential educationconcerning therapeutics and resultant physician prescribing patterns. J Med Educ..Peter Mansfield: Healthy Skepticism about pharmaceutical promotion page 44. Berings D, Blondeel L, Habra ken H. The effect of industry-independent druginformation on the prescribing of benzodiazepines in general practice. Eur J ClinPharmacology.5. Haayer F. Rational prescribing and sources of information.6. Muijrers PE, Grol RP, Sijbrandij J, Janknegt R, Knottnerus JA. Differences inprescribing between GPs: impact of the cooperation with pharmacists and impact of visitsfrom pharmaceutical industry representatives.7. Spingarn RW, Berlin JA, Strom BL. When pharmaceutical manufacturers employeespresent grand rounds, what do residents remember? Acad Med. 1996 Jan;71(1):86-8.Of the7 studies 4 found that exposure to promotion correlated with lower quality prescribing.Two studies found no correlation. This could mean that promotion is not effective all thetime or perhaps there were effects that those 2 studies did not detect. One study foundmixed effects. Exposure to promotion was associated with higher levels of prescribing forless common severe cases where the drug was appropriate (improving quality) but alsohigher levels of prescribing for more common less severe cases where the drug wasinappropriate (decreasing quality). On the available evidence exposure to promotion can beassociated with increased or decreased quality of prescribing. It may sometimes have noeffect, in which case it is just a waste of money. It appears that overall exposure to drugpromotion may do more good than harm. There is not enough evidence of benefit to justifydoctors investing their limited time in allowing themselves to be exposed to drugpromotion. There is corruption in most professions including the medical profession.However that is not the main problem arising from drug promotion. The main problem is BABASAB PATIL 28
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryunintended bias. “Social science research shows that even when individuals try to beobjective their judgments are subject to an unconscious and unintentional self-servingbias.”8What percentage of promotion is potentially misleading? The answer to this question depends on definition used. My definition is:Promotion is potentially misleading when it omits relevant information that is needed forgood decisions or includes persuasion techniques that that have beenidentified as potentially misleading in studies of logic, critical appraisal, psychology orrhetoric. These techniques ay beused deliberately with intent to mislead or ay be used innocently by people who have beenmisled themselves. For 25 years I have been looking for an example of promotion that isnot potentially misleading. The reason I want such an example is that I want to influencedrug companies and praise is a more effective way to influence people than criticism.However I have not been able to find any examples in Australia or any of the many othercountries I have visited. Sometimes I have found advertisements that I initially think are okbut on loser examination I find that they had fooled me. I frequently ask audiences at thetalks I give to send an example of promotion that is not potentially misleading butnonehave been sent to me. If you see a good example please send it to me atpeter@healthyskepticism.org. It is still possible that some promotion is ok but I think theparentage must be very small. I conclude that the percentage of promotion is potentiallymisleading is likely to be near 100%.Overview of pharmaceutical:Clinical research and development in the drug industry must be understood in the currentpolitical and economic context of medical neoliberalism (Fisher 2007a; forthcoming). Inthe US, neoliberalism is the guiding ideology behind economic policies that emphasize areduction in social services provided by the state and an increase in the role of the private(for-profit) sector in the provision of social goods, such as health care, welfare, andeducation (Monahan 2006). Medical neoliberalism, in particular, is manifest in a consumermodel of health characterized by an inequitable distribution of services according to who BABASAB PATIL 29
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrycan pay for different kinds of care (Frank 2002). The pharmaceutical industry benefitsfrom neoliberal forms of health care because un(der)insured populations in the US can berecruited as human subjects into clinical trials in exchange for limited, medical attentionfor the duration of studies (Fisher 2007b).5 In addition, many health care providers arelooking for new ways to increase their revenue through a diversification of services (Gray1993). In this climate, physicians become targeted as potential investigators onpharmaceutical studies (Pham et al. 2004). The resulting organization of clinical trials hasimportant implications for relationships of trust in drug development. Pharmaceuticalclinical trials are characterized as ‘contract research.’ Unlike investigator-initiatedresearch, those conducting pharmaceutical studies rarely have any role in defining theresearch questions, designing the protocols, or analyzing the results. Instead, scientists andresearchers at pharmaceutical companies determine these elements of clinical trials, andclinicians are then hired to execute the protocols using their patients as subjects. Althoughphysicians at academic medical centers and university hospitals confer legitimacy andprestige on pharmaceutical studies, the bulk of contract research is conducted in the privatesector by physicians in private practices or for-profit, dedicated research centers.Conceptual framework:The concept of trust provides a useful lens for exploring relationships amongpharmaceutical companies, clinicians (i.e., physicians and research coordinators), andhuman subjects engaged in drug development. In the majority of scholarship on trust inmedicine, the focus is primarily trained on patients’ trust in their personal care providers,human subjects’ trust in the researchers or institutions conducting clinical trials, and BABASAB PATIL 30
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrycitizens’ trust in their health care delivery systems (e.g., Mill man 1977; Mechanic 1996;Kao et al. 1998; O’Neill 2002; Allsop 2006). Yet, for pharmaceutical clinical trials tooperate effectively, clinicians must trust the pharmaceutical companies with which they areworking and pharmaceutical companies must trust the clinicians and human subjects. Witheach of these relationships, trust is multifaceted and negotiated as individuals respond totheir own and others’ institutional opportunities and constraints. Several modes of trust arecritical for the success of clinical development. In the clinical trials industry as seenelsewhere, trust is necessary to ensure effective cooperation of all relevant actors andorganizations (see Luhmann 1979; La Porta et al. 1997). One way of understanding thisdynamic is to distinguish between how trust is constituted differently in individuals andinstitutions. This difference in types of trust is important because both levels—theindividual and institutional—can shape the other, but each have unique implications,particularly if trust is misplaced (O’Neill 2002). Specifically, trust in individuals mayoveremphasize those actors’ intentions and motives while obscuring the effects of howinstitutions structure (and limit) that trust (Shapiro 1987). For example, physiciansconducting drug trials may indeed have the best interest of human subjects in mind, butnonetheless they have only limited jurisdiction over decision-making regarding subjects’participation. Thus, subjects’ trust in those physicians may give them a false sense ofconfidence that their wellbeing is appropriately safeguarded. Examining trust at the levelof individuals can ignore the myriad constraints that are placed on the range of individualactions and choices.confidence in the integrity of the federal government (5 CFR2635.101; EO 12674). Whereas the public relies on legal enforcement mechanisms toassure that private health care organizations comply with relevant law and regulation, theyexpect public agencies and employees to adopt policies that not merely follow the rule oflaw but also promote its spirit by establishing goals of exemplary behavior as ethicalstandards. Acceptance of any type of gift from the pharmaceutical industry by VHAemployees risks eroding public trust in VHA, possibly to a greater degree than would bethe case for employees in private agencies. More importantly, the beneficiaries ofgovernment programs—veterans, in the case of VHA—are often more dependent ongovernment services than are those who rely on private programs. This greater dependencegives rise to the government’s obligation to adhere to a stricter ethical standard. Effects on BABASAB PATIL 31
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryProfessional Relationships. Given the ways in which gift giving differs from entering intoa contractual relationship, gifts from pharmaceutical representatives to health careprofessionals can blur the distinction between formal business exchanges and informal,interpersonal exchanges.13 The social experience of giving and receiving gifts affects therelationship between the two parties in complex and subtle ways. Anthropologicalliterature13 explains that the recipient of a gift often feels three types of obligation towardthe giver: grateful conduct (i.e., acceptance of the gift and expression of gratitude), gratefuluse (i.e., in accord with the giver’s intention), and reciprocation. Obligations to accept thegift and thank the giver and to use the gift as the giver intended stem from the purpose ofgift exchange—building personal, moral relationships. The felt obligation to reciprocate, togive or do something in exchange for the gift is most troubling in the health care context.As Murray notes, “Appropriate reciprocation depends on particular cultural norms and thespecifics of the relationship.”13 In the context of a gift to a health care professional from apharmaceutical industry representative, practitioners commonly understand that the hopedfor reciprocation involves the health care professional writing more prescriptions for thedrug(s) the representative is promoting. Bias & Conflicts of Interest. Health careprofessionals may be influenced by accepting gifts in two ways. As we have noted, theyunderstand that prescribing selected pharmaceutical products is the industry’s preferredform of reciprocation, and some may be influenced to do so in response to the giftreceived. One study, for example, found that physicians who met with or accepted moneyfrom representatives of pharmaceutical companies (e.g., for educational presentations)were more likely to request that the companies’ drugs be added to a hospital pharmacythan were colleagues who did not interact with pharmaceutical companies.18 A review ofphysicians’ prescribing patterns found that usage of two drugs increased significantlyamong physicians who attended “all-expense-paid” symposia at resorts sponsored by themanufacturer of the drugs compared to their practice before the symposia.19 The majorityof physicians responding did not believe that such incentives would alter their prescribingpractices. Similarly, a recent study reported that British general practitioners who hadweekly contact with drug company representatives were more willing to prescribe newdrugs and more likely “to express views that will lead to unnecessary prescribing” thangeneral practitioners with less frequent contact with pharmaceutical representatives.20 The BABASAB PATIL 32
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrysecond concern is that gifts may insidiously introduce undetected or under appreciated biasinto professionals’ assessment of the overall merit or value of promoted pharmaceuticalproducts. There is evidence to indicate that practitioners themselves are often poor judgesof whether or when external factors, such as gifts, influence their decision making.3, 15,21–23 For example, 86% of respondents to a nurse practitioner and physician assistantsurvey regarding pharmaceutical industry.Retention of employees training: Here training fits in. Many employers believe that training boosts morale,enhances motivation, and improves personnel retention. Marriott hotels found, forexample, that effective training of its entry-level workers had a profound effect on keepingthese employees.The Florida Power Corp. reduced its annual turnover rate from 48% to 9% using a uniquecombination of training and employment screening. After receiving instruction in 12essential skills, job applicants were expected to successfully demonstrate these skills. A1992 Southport Institute study of workplace education concluded that the longer anorganization had an educational program in place for its personnel, the more likely it wasto experience lower turnover, improved morale, and reduced hostility among its people.[2]* What else affects turnover? While there have been other reports of dramatic decreases inemployee turnover due to effective training, most of these studies lack validity since duringthe periods studied there were concomitant changes that could have influenced turnoverrates. For instance, Roma Lee Taunton attempted to measure the impact of managementtraining on turnover among nurses. Although her findings suggested a positive cause-effect, results may have been skewed: At the time of her study, considerable downsizing ofhospitals was taking place in her area.[2] It seems to follow that anything that increasesunemployment may also increase worker retention.Employee selection procedures can also distort turnover studies (better selection oftenresults in diminished turnover). Richard Wellins is quoted as saying, "If you have a BABASAB PATIL 33
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryturnover problem ... 8 of 10 times it may very well be due to selection of personnel ratherthan (lack of) training."Leadership styles and major management innovations have a significant impact onturnover, too. Wellins found, for instance, that the turnover rate in work-team--orientedfacilities was sometimes half that of similar institutions with traditional worker-management structures.Almost anything that influences morale can affect turnover (salary and benefits, newpolicies or practices, changes in leadership, union organizing activities, to name just afew). If you believe employee attitude surveys truly reflect morale, and you accept thetheory that morale is an important factor in personnel retention, then there is abundantevidence to support the fact that training positively affects holding onto employees. Astudy of chain-store employees showed a marked reduction in employee dissatisfactionafter an interpersonal skills training program was implemented. Jo Westfall claims thatsatisfaction surveys led to improved laboratory employee retention.Organization chart: MD HR MANEGER CLERK& JUNIR BABASAB PATIL MANEGER MANEGER SENIOR EXECETIVE MAINTENAN 34 STORES MANEGER OFFICE OFFICER LAB JUNIR TRINEE QUALITY OFFICE GENERAL EXCETIVE OFFICER MICROBIOL LAB HEAD CE ACCOUNT ASSISTSNT ACCOUNT ASSISTANT OFFICER CHEMIST ASSURANCE ASSISTANT WORKS OFFICER OGIST ASSISTANT BREWER ENGINEER
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryResearch Methodology:Data Source : Primary Data (Field Survey) Secondary data-InternetArea of Research : BangaloreResearch approach : Survey methodResearch Instrument : Questionnaire BABASAB PATIL 35 MICROBIOL OGIST
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industrySample Plan : Personal Interview.Sampling method : SPSS student version softwareSample size : 100 Respondents1.In which of he following rewards system would you like to work? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Validpiece rate 36 36.0 36.0 36.0 system fixed salary 32 32.0 32.0 68.0 BABASAB PATIL 36
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry fixed salary 20 20.0 20.0 88.0 commissio n any other 12 12.0 12.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0in which of he following rewards system would you like to work? any other piece rate system fixed salary+commiss fixed salary Interpretation: From above table show that 36% respondent are reward system kike would be piece rate system, 32% fixed salary ,20% fixed and commission,12% any other. 2.Are you getting equal wages for equal work? Frequency PercentValid Percent Cumulative Percent Valid yes 84 84.0 84.0 84.0 BABASAB PATIL 37
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry no 16 16.0 16.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 are you getting equal wages for equal work? no yesInterpretation: From above table show that out of 100 respondents are response 84%Are Getting equal wage for equal work. And remaining are 16% are no.3. If, not list the demand that are not so far met by the company? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent ValidHRA 3 3.0 3.0 3.0 Increase JA 4 4.0 4.0 7.0 Increase BABASAB PATIL 38
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Basic 4 4.0 4.0 11.0 DA 5 5.0 5.0 16.0 Not 84 84.0 84.0 100.0 responds Total 100 100.0 100.0 if, not list the demand that are not so far met by the company? 100 80 60 40 Frequency 20 0 HRA Increase basic not responds JA Increase DA if, not list the demand that are not so far met by the company?Interpretation From above table show that 84% are satisefy with equal salaryOnly 16% are not happy with salary they demand for 3% HRA increase, 4% JA increaseAnd basic, 5% DA increase.4.If the above need fulfilled, for how many extra hours you are ready to work? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid 2 hrs 45 45.0 45.0 45.0 4 hrs 44 44.0 44.0 89.0 8 hrs 5 5.0 5.0 94.0 BABASAB PATIL 39
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry i will not are 6 6.0 6.0 100.0 ready to work Total 100 100.0 100.0 if the above need fulfilled, for how many extra hours you are ready to w 50 40 30 20 Frequency 10 0 2 hrs 4 hrs 8 hrs i w ill not are ready if the above need fulfilled, for how many extra hours you are ready to wInterpretation: From above table has show that if the needs are to be fulfilled. Therespondent are response 45% are 2hrs,44% are 4hrs, 5% are 8hrs,and remaining 6% areI will not ready work are response5. Are you having job security in your company? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulativ Percent e Percent Validyes 76 76.0 76.0 76.0 BABASAB PATIL 40
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry no 24 24.0 24.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 are you having job security in your company? 80 60 40 20 Frequency 0 yes no are you having job security in your company?Interpretation: According to survey I have know that at 76% are respondents are havingjob security in company and 24% are not having any security in that company.6.Job security plays very important role to work more? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Validstrongly 18 18.0 18.0 18.0 agree agree 58 58.0 58.0 76.0 disagree 14 14.0 14.0 90.0 BABASAB PATIL 41
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry strongly 10 10.0 10.0 100.0 disagree Total 100 100.0 100.0 job security plays very important role to work more? 70 60 50 40 30 20 Frequency 10 0 strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree job security plays very important role to work more?Interpretation: According to survey I have know that out 100 respondentsare job is security plays very important role to work in company 18% are strongly agree58% are agree, 14% are dis agree, 10 % are strongly dis agree.7.Do you know the exact goals of your company? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent BABASAB PATIL 42
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Validyes 80 80.0 80.0 80.0 no 20 20.0 20.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 do you know the exact goals of your company? 100 80 60 40 Frequency 20 0 yes no do you know the exact goals of your company?Interpretation: According to survey i know that the responds 80% are know the exactgoals of company, and 20% are not exact goals of company.8.Do you feel are working in consonance with goals of the organization? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulativ Percent e Percent ValidYes 79 79.0 79.0 79.0 BABASAB PATIL 43
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry No 21 21.0 21.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 do you feel are working in consonance with goals of the organization? 100 80 60 40 Frequency 20 0 yes no do you feel are working in consonance with goals of the organization?Interpretation: According to survey out 100 respondent are feel working in consonancewith go with goals of the organization 79% are respondents’ yes, and remaining respondedare 21% no9. Recognition of sincere efforts motivates a person work well? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulativ Percent e Percent Validstrongly 29 29.0 29.0 29.0 gree agree 59 59.0 59.0 88.0 disagree 9 9.0 9.0 97.0 BABASAB PATIL 44
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry strongly 3 3.0 3.0 100.0 disagree Total 100 100.0 100.0 recognition of sincere efforts motivates a person work well? 70 60 50 40 30 20 Frequency 10 0 strongly gree agree disagree strongly disagree recognition of sincere efforts motivates a person work well?Interpretation: According to survey know that recognition of sincere efforts motivate aperson work well out 100 respondents’ are 29% are strongly agree, 59 % are agree 9% aredis agree and remaining strongly disagree.10.The recognition of good work ,if considered for promotion, it will motivate theworkers to work well Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid strongly 49 49.0 49.0 49.0 agree agree 41 41.0 41.0 90.0 BABASAB PATIL 45
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry disagree 5 5.0 5.0 95.0 strongly 5 5.0 5.0 100.0 disagree Total 100 100.0 100.0 the recognition of good work,if considered for promotion,it will motivat 60 50 40 30 20 Frequency 10 0 strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree the recognition of good work,if considered for promotion,it will motivatInterpretation: According to survey the strongly recognition of good work, if considered forpromotion, it will motivate workers to work well, 49% are strongly dis agree 41% areagree, 5% are disagree and strongly disagree.11. Authority and responsibility are well balanced in our organization? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulativ Percent e Percent Validstrongly 51 51.0 51.0 51.0 agree agree 41 41.0 41.0 92.0 disagree 5 5.0 5.0 97.0 strongly 3 3.0 3.0 100.0 BABASAB PATIL 46
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry disagree Total 100 100.0 100.0 authority and responsibility are well balanced in our organization? 60 50 40 30 20 Frequency 10 0 strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree authority and responsibility are well balanced in our organization?Interpretation: According to survey out 100 respondents are responds Authority andresponsibility are balanced in their organization 51 % are strongly agree, 41% are agree5% are disagree,3% are strongly disagree.12. Are you getting canteen, sanitary, quarters, medical fecility very well and thoseare motivating factors? Frequency Percent ValidCumulative Percent Percent Validstrongly 47 47.0 47.0 47.0 agree agree 35 35.0 35.0 82.0 BABASAB PATIL 47
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry disagree 11 11.0 11.0 93.0 strongly 7 7.0 7.0 100.0 disagree Total 100 100.0 100.0 are you getting canteen,sanitary,quarters, medical fecility very well an 50 40 30 20 Frequency 10 0 strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree are you getting canteen,sanitary,quarters, medical fecility very well anInterpretation: According to survey out respondents’ are responds getting canteen, sanitary,quarters medical facility. 47% are strongly agree, 35% are agree, 11% are disagree andremaining 7% are strongly disagree.13, Are happy with the position and the status of the job in which you are working? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulativ Percent e Percent Validyes 81 81.0 81.0 81.0 no 19 19.0 19.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 BABASAB PATIL 48
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry are happy with the position and the statusof the job in which you are w 100 80 60 40 Frequency 20 0 yes no are happy with the position and the statusof the job in which you are woInterpretation: According to survey I know that the respondents’ are happy with position andstatus of the job in which are working at 81% are yes, 19% are no.14. Work and working conditions are pleasant and interesting? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid yes 80 80.0 80.0 80.0 no 20 20.0 20.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 BABASAB PATIL 49
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry work and working conditions are pleasant and interesting? 100 80 60 40 Frequency 20 0 yes no work and working conditions are pleasant and interesting?Interpretation: According to survey the responds are working and working conditionare pleasant and interesting 80% are yes, 20% are no.15.If not why? Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Validplace of work is not 10 10.0 10.0 10.0 congenial BABASAB PATIL 50
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry strained superior 8 8.0 8.0 18.0 and subordinate relationship defective 8 8.0 8.0 26.0 combination system any other(specify) 13 13.0 13.0 39.0 not respond 61 61.0 61.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 if not why? place of w ork is not strraned superior an defective combinatio not respond any other(specify)Interpretation: According to survey 10% are place of work is not congenial 8% arestrained superior relationship and defective combination system 13% are any other and61% are not responds.16. The worker wishes belong to one or other informal group in organ? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulativ Percent e Percent Valid yes 90 90.0 90.0 90.0 BABASAB PATIL 51
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry no 10 10.0 10.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0the worker wishes belong to one or other informal group in organ? no yes Interpretation: According to survey I know that the respondents are worker wisher belongs to one and another informal group in the organization 90% are response yes, 10% are no. 17.If yes, do you feel the association with the informal group motivates the employee to work well in the organization? BABASAB PATIL 52
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid yes 90 90.0 90.0 90.0 no 10 10.0 10.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0if yes, do you feel the association with the informal group motivates th no yes Interpretation: According to survey know that the 90% are responds are yes for they feel the association with the informal group motivate the employee to work well in organization and remaining 10% are no. 18. Are you happy other members of the group with which you are working? BABASAB PATIL 53
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Validyes 81 81.0 81.0 81.0 no 19 19.0 19.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0are you happy other members of the group with which you are working? no yes Interpretation: According to survey I have know that 81% are responds are happy with the work with other member in the organization. And 19% are against. 19.If not, why? BABASAB PATIL 54
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Validlack of 16 16.0 16.0 16.0 cohesion among the members lack of 5 5.0 5.0 21.0 cooperation among the lack of 7 7.0 7.0 28.0 coordination any 18 18.0 18.0 46.0 other(specify ) not responds 54 54.0 54.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 if not,why? lack of cohesion amo lack of cooperation lack of coordination not responds any other(specify)Interpretation; According to survey know that 61% are lack of cohesion among the members,5% are lack of cooperation among members, 7% are lack of coordination ,18% are anyspecify and 54% are not responds. BABASAB PATIL 55
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry 20. Are you in position to work with head and heart (with devotion and happiness) in your co? Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid yes 76 76.0 76.0 76.0 no 24 24.0 24.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0are you in position to work with head and heart(with devotion and happin no yes Interpretation: According to survey knot that respondents’ are position with head and heart (with devotion and happiness) with company at 76% are yes, 24% are no 21. if not, why? BABASAB PATIL 56
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Validlack of efforts by 20 20.0 20.0 20.0 management to improve employee morale improper delegation 10 10.0 10.0 30.0 system imbalance between 4 4.0 4.0 34.0 authority and responsibility lack of proper 10 10.0 10.0 44.0 encourage ti sincere workr not responds 56 56.0 56.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 if not, why? lack of efforts by m improper delagation not responds imbalance betw een au lack of proper encouInterpretation: According to survey most respondents are 56% are not responds 20%are lank of efforts by management 10% are improper delegation 4% are imbalancebetween authority and responsibility, 10% are lack proper encourage increase work.22. Do you feel you are involved in decision making process? BABASAB PATIL 57
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid yes 80 80.0 80.0 80.0 no 20 20.0 20.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0do you feel you are involved in decision making process? no yesInterpretation; From above table show that out 100 respondents are responds they feelinvolved in decision making processes at 80% are yes. And 20% are no.23.if not, why? BABASAB PATIL 58
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Validnegligence 1 1.0 1.0 1.0 and unwillingne ss of managem ent procedural 6 6.0 6.0 7.0 problems lack of 7 7.0 7.0 14.0 faith any other 6 6.0 6.0 20.0 specify not 80 80.0 80.0 100.0 respond Total 100 100.0 100.0 if not, why? negligence and unw il procedural problems lack of faith any other specify not respondInterpretation: According to survey I know that 80% are not responds for this questionbut 1%,6%,7%,6%, negligence and unwillingness of management, procedural problems,lack of faith, any other specify.24.Are you having sufficient job advancement opportunites in your company? BABASAB PATIL 59
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative Percent Percent Valid yes 77 77.0 77.0 77.0 no 23 23.0 23.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0are you having sufficient job advancement opportunites in your company? no yes Interpretation: According to survey know that 77% are responds are yes, and 23% are no in having sufficient job advancement opportunities in your company 25.If not, do you feel it need for employees motivation? BABASAB PATIL 60
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry Frequen Percent Valid Cumulat cy Percent ive Percent Validyes 21 21.0 21.0 21.0 no 2 2.0 2.0 23.0 3 77 77.0 77.0 100.0 Total 100 100.0 100.0 if not, doy feel it neede for empoloyees motivation? yes no not respondInterpretation: According to survey know that 21% are responds are feel it need foremployees motivation, and 2% are no and remaining are not responds.Findings: BABASAB PATIL 61
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry  In company the coordination is very good between the employees and management.  In the company the employee satisfaction with there job.  The mutual coordination between the members in company.  The rewards systems are in the company is very piece rate system  The company has giving equal wages to the employee.  The company recognition of sincere efforts to motivate the employee in organization.  The present working condition is very good in lake chemical industry.  The employees have facing problem with decision making process to progress there company.Suggestions:  The company has focus on giving extra security to employee in inside the organization  The company having aware of exact goals of there industry.  To motivate employee the company having giving extra benefit to improve Working condition in company.CONCLUSION: Assessment of overall performance of the pharmaceutical firms, as perceivedby research sample, was relatively high, only learning/ growth/ innovation dimension got BABASAB PATIL 62
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryan assessment below high level. Performance measures which were assessed a little belowhigh level were:¨ Resources acquisition and utilization¨ Employees’ satisfaction¨ attracting new customers¨ introducing new policies, strategies, etcOnly one performance indicator was below the mean of the scale (3); that was“development of new production methods”.Research findings indicated rather strong positive relationship between Employee andorganization performance at Lake chemical firms. BIBLIOGRAPHY BABASAB PATIL 63
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry  LAKE Chemical Notes  WWW.lake chemical.com  WWW.google.com  Business magazines (business times)  News papers (Economic times, Times of India). Questionnaire1) Name: _________________________________________________ BABASAB PATIL 64
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry2) Age :3) Gender: Male Female4) Occupation: Professional Others5) Annual Income: Below 1, 00,000 1, 00,000 – 3, 00,000 3, 00,000 – 5, 00, 000 5, 00,000 & Above6) Address:_______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________7) Contact number: _______________________________ INTERVIEW SCHEDULE FOR EMPLOYEES:1. In which of the following reward system would you like to work? i. Piece rate system ii. Fixed salary iii. Fixed salary+ Commission iv. Any other2. Are you getting equal wages for equal work? i. Yes ii. No3. If not, list the demands that are not so far met by the company. i. HRA increase ii. JA increase iii. Basic iv. DA4. If the above need fulfilled, for how many extra hrs you are ready to work? i. 2Hrs ii.4Hrs iii.8Hrs iv. I will not are ready to work?5. Are you having job security in your company? BABASAB PATIL 65
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry i. Yes ii. No6. Job security plays very important role to work more i. Strongly agree ii. Agree iii. Disagree iv. Strongly disagree 7. Do you know the exact goals of your company? i. yes ii. No 8. Do you feel are working in consonance with the goals of the organization i. Yes ii. No9. Recognition of sincere efforts motivates a person work well i. Strongly agree ii. Agree iii. Disagree iv. Strongly disagree10. The recognition of good work, if considered for promotion, it will motivate the workers to work well i. Strongly agree ii. Agree iii. Disagree iv. Strongly disagree11. Authority and responsibility are well balanced in our organ. i. Strongly agree ii. Agree iii. Disagree iv. Strongly disagree12. Are you getting canteen, sanitary, Quarters, Medical facilities very well and those are motivating factors. i. Strongly agree ii. Agree iii. Disagree iv. Strongly disagree13. Are you happy with the position and the status of the job in which you are working i. Yes ii. No14. Work and working conditions are pleasant and interesting i. Yes ii. No 15. If not why?i. place of work is not congenial ii. Strained superior and subordinate relationshipiii. Defective combination system iv. Any other (specify)16. The worker wishes belong to one or other informal group in Orgn i. yes ii. No17. If yes, do you feel the association with the informal group motivates the employee to work well in the organization? i. Yes ii. No18. Are you happy other members of the group with which you are working? i. Yes ii. No19. If not why? BABASAB PATIL 66
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industry i. Lack of cohesion among the members ii. Lack of co-operation among the iii. Lack of co ordination iv. Any other specify20. Are you in a position to work with head and heart (with devotion and happiness) in your co., i. yes ii. No21. If not, why? i. Lack of efforts by management to improve employee morale ii. Improper delegation system iii. Imbalance between authority and responsibility iv. Lack of proper encourage to sincere worker22. Do you feel you are involved in decision making process? i. Yes ii. No23. .If not, why? i. Negligence and unwillingness of management ii. Procedural problems iii. Lack of faith iv. Any other specify24. Are you having sufficient job advancement opportunities in your company? i. Yes ii. No25. If not, do you feel it needed for employees motivation? i. Yes ii. No BABASAB PATIL 67
  • Retention of employees in pharmaceutical industryBABASAB PATIL 68