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Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
Crowd sourcing and tablet applications
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Crowd sourcing and tablet applications

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  • Advantages of crowd sourcingSharing information and ideasIncreasing collective knowledgeEncouraging collective creativity and innovationSupporting collective lending efforts Facilitating civic engagement
  • The purpose of the platform is to gather distributed data from the public via several media and communication channels (i.e., SMS, email, and web) and to visualize it on a map or timeline
  • Ground surveys are performed by a mapper, on foot, bicycle, or in a car or boat. Map data are usually collected using a GPS unit, although this is not strictly necessary if an area has already been traced from satellite imagery.Once the data have been collected, they are entered into the database by uploading them on the project's website. At that point, no information about the kind of uploaded track is available – it could be e.g., a motorway, a footpath, or a river. Thus, in a second step, editing takes place using one of several purpose-built map editors (e.g., JOSM). This is usually done by the same mapper, sometimes by other contributors registered at OpenStreetMap.As collecting and uploading data is separated from editing objects, contribution to the project is possible also without using a GPS unit. In particular, placing and editing objects such as schools, hospitals, taxi ranks, bus stops, pubs, etc. is done based on editors' local knowledge.
  • On Kiva.org, internationally based lenders create and personalize individual profiles. Lenderscan act individually, or can join “Lending Teams” to attribute their loans to a collectivecampaign or to compare their joint impact with other like-interest, regional or demographicgroups. Lenders capitalize their Kiva.org accounts with personal money, browse the profilesof entrepreneurs located around the world, and choose those to whom they would like tolend money. The platform is additionally built with systemic checks and balances, such asthe feature that lenders cannot view or post to message boards until their account iscapitalized with at least $25, the minimum lending amount. Lenders are advised on potentialcountry, Microfinance Institute, and personal loan default potential, described respectively as“Country Risk,” “Field Partner Risk,” and “Entrepreneur Risk.” Loans are providedglobally to Kiva “Field Partners,” or MFIs, located in 48 countries that then distributemoney to individual entrepreneurs. Capital is provided in minimum $25 loans at zeropercent-interest, though repayment to the lender comes incrementally, with small cashinstallments that recapitalize individual accounts.
  • The CitiVox platform hub for receiving, categorizing assigning the police officer responsible for solving the issue. CitiVox enables real-time information sharing via SMS, e-mail, and smartphone applications between citizens and their government as a means of rebuilding confidence, increasing public security, and improving accountability. Oscar calls it “We-Government.” The platform has four major features: 1) report: citizens say what’s really happening using mobile technology; 2) manage: governments follows-up and assigns resources; 3) measure: users generate maps, graphs, and statistics; and 4) communicate: data is made public. CitiVox creates significant value for the public - See more at:
  • Also embedded in each tablet is a wireless connection to what the OTPC team calls the "sneakernet". This connection allows the scientific team out in the field to study how the children use the devices and how they develop.
  • Aims to assist rural health care workers patient information, diagnostic tools and new treatment procedures in rural areas across India.Easy to use: The tablet is expected to run on an Intel Atom processor with several external interfaces like a microphone, audio-output and USB connection.
  • Transcript

    • 1. CROWD SOURCING TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS FOR TABLETS SIL: : ICT4D Summer Series11-07-2013 1
    • 2. Crowd Sourcing 2 Definition: ‘crowdsourcing represents the act of a company or institution taking a function once performed by employees and outsourcing it to an undefined (and generally large) network of people in the form of an open call’ (Howe, 2006)
    • 3. Crowd Sourcing Tech. 3  Case study 1: Ushahidi, Kenya  Technology: Ushahidi Platform  The purpose of the platform is to gather distributed data from the public and visualize it on a map or timeline  Advantages  Free App  Allows for real time monitoring  Low technology requirements for users  Distinguishes between verified and unverified information  Limitations  Basic literacy skills required to access and send information
    • 4. Porgramme Applications 4  Application: Real time monitoring and mapping of dispersed events and structures  Programmes (External):  Election monitoring: India  Monitoring unrest: Congo  Mapping Sexual Harassment: Egypt  Brac Programmes: HRLN, Relief works, Gender, Road safety  ‘The world we want’ (SIL, Brac) Crowd map of the ‘World We Want’
    • 5. Crowd Sourcing Tech. 5  Case study 2: Mapkathmandu, Nepal  Technology: Open street maps (OSM)  Collaborative project to create a free editable map  Advantages:  Freely available  Creates and uses open data  Robust: maps can be edited and verified  Limitations:  Verification problems: any user can edit the map  Imaging is not as advanced as Google
    • 6. Programme Applications  Application: Mapping of locally relevant areas and structures  Programmes (External):  Mapping slums: Kenya  Disaster response: Haiti and India  Disaster readiness: Indonesia and Bangladesh  BRAC Programmes: Disaster Relief, WASH, mapping beneficiary HHs 6 OSM of Kibera, Education Institutions
    • 7. Applications for Crowd Sourcing 7  Case study 3: Crowd sourced funding, Kiva  Facilitating individuals from across the world to lend money online to low-income individuals  Advantages  Provides initial capital  100% of the loan amount is transferred to MF institutions  Limitations  Irregular supply depending on the number of borrowers  No financial return for lenders  Application: Initial capital for microfinance is needed  Programmes: Microfinance  BRAC programmes: Programmes offering microfinance services, e.g. AFSP
    • 8. Tablets Devices 9  Tablets are a form of mobile computing devices  Advantages for developing countries:  Intuitive and accessible  Suited to infrastructure challenges  Portable and Mobile  Application oriented
    • 9. Growth in Tablet Tech. 10 Tablet shipment forecast for 2013 expected to reach 229.3 million units. PCs shipments face a 7.8% slump
    • 10. Applications for Tablet devices 11  Case study 1: One tablet per child, Ethiopia  Technology: Tablet designed by OLPC  The tablets are pre-installed with an array of educational applications and learning tools to facilitate self learning.  Advantages  The tablets are equipped with solar panels  Tracking children's learning patterns  New apps and content can be delivered to the tablets seamlessly  Limitations:  concerns related to scaling programmes  Impact not established
    • 11. Porgramme Applications  Applications: Student cantered learning, i.e. teaching is tailored to student’s learning style  Porgramme (External):  E- learning: Thailand  Aakash: India  BRAC programmes: Education programmes 12 One tablet per child experiment in Ethiopia
    • 12. Applications for Tablet devices 13  Case study 2: Health Care, India  Technology: ‘Kalam-Raju’ Tablet  Aims to assist rural health care workers.  Advantages  Stores patient history  User friendly  Access to diagnostic tools  Affordable  Limitations  Pilot phase  Applications: Streamlining medical assistance and overcoming logistical challenges  Programmes (External): Health e-villages: Haiti and Kenya  BRAC programmes: Health programmes such as MNCH
    • 13. ICT4D Lessons Learned 14  Considerations  Technology is a ‘tool’  It suits particular needs and contexts  Spaces for innovation  Broadening scope and application  Combining technologies  Programme Application  Finding a technology that fits needs of beneficiaries and matches their capacities
    • 14. Map of Korail 15

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