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Water Wise Roadmap Document Transcript

  • 1. Final 6-21-12 A Roadmap to Water-wise Parkland in Balboa Park: Optimizing Water Use by 2020 - A Call to Action Friends of Balboa Park - May 2012 Photograph by Richard Seignious “With time and water, everything changes.” Leonardo da Vinci
  • 2. Final 6-21-12 TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface .................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Acknowledgments................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................................. 4 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................................ 5 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 References ............................................................................................................................................................................ 15 Timeline................................................................................................................................................................................. 16 Summary Project Descriptions .............................................................................................................................................. 17 Map Appendix ....................................................................................................................................................................... 35 1
  • 3. Final 6-21-12 PREFACE The mission of the Friends of Balboa Park (www.friendsofbalboapark.org) is to preserve Balboa Park’s legacy for future generations through park-wide projects. We are a charitable 501(c)3 organization that collaborates with City of San Diego Park and Recreation Department Staff (Park staff), Park stakeholders, and community members to accomplish this mission. One legacy we wish to impact is the environmental sustainability of the Park, and there is no more precious natural resource than water. Thanks to the generosity of time, expertise, and money, we coalesced a community of outstanding experts to develop a water-wise roadmap that can optimize water use in Balboa Park’s Parkland by 2020. This document is that roadmap. It is comprised of short-term, mid-term, and long-term project proposals. For each shortterm proposal a more detailed plan will be written, resources will be raised, and final approval will be solicited from the Park and Recreation Department. Because Park staff were involved in the development of the roadmap, we anticipate being able to proceed quickly with the majority of these short-term projects. Also, the roadmap is a living document, to be revised on a regular basis. In this way it can continue to respond to current needs for improved water use in the parkland. We began a parallel legacy with the approach taken. It involved establishing a Community of Practice in order to create a collaborative, mutually supportive environment that allowed the experts to share their knowledge and effectively apply it to meeting the Park’s water management needs. This approach had several benefits. It enabled the group to successfully build this roadmap in a very short time, have a very constructive dialogue with Park staff, and, most importantly, generate enthusiasm for implementing the roadmap. The effort fits within the broader vision to significantly advance environmental sustainability in Balboa Park by 2015. This vision has been promulgated by Balboa Park’s Sustainability Alliance--a key group of internal and external stakeholders that includes Friends of Balboa Park. By the end of 2015 and beyond, the intent is to leave a legacy to future generations in the form of a “Green Balboa Park.” The alliance is managed by the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership and has developed an Environmental Sustainability Strategic Plan (www.bpcp.org/program/bpsp). 2
  • 4. Final 6-21-12 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Friends of Balboa Park wishes to sincerely recognize everyone who contributed to the creation of this water-wise roadmap. Dorothea and Richard Laub for their steadfast investments in making the parkland water-wise and recognizing the need to involve experts from the community in achieving this goal. Betty Peabody, a founder of the Friends of Balboa Park, for her many invaluable contributions toward furthering a vision of a water-wise Balboa Park, and this step toward making it a reality. Laurie Broedling, LB Organizational Consulting, for successfully performing the role of project manager and organizer of this water-wise community. Stanley Maloy, Dean of the College of Sciences, San Diego State University, for facilitating all the meetings of the waterwise community, infusing it with scientific professionalism, and enhancing its membership with numerous experts in the field. Alan Sweedler, Assistant Vice President, International Programs, San Diego State University, for assisting in launching this project as well actively participating by contributing his scientific and practical knowledge. The other members of the Water-wise Community of Practice for Balboa Park’s Parkland: Alexandria Bennett, Point Loma Nazarene University; Ravi Bajaj, San Diego Green Building Council; Katie Carl, San Diego High School; Ken Gammage, Communications & Media Relations Professional; Robert Gilleskie, Marine Corp Installations West; Richard Graff, Richard Graff Designs Owner; Len Hering RADM, USN (ret), formerly Commander of Navy Region Southwest and Navy Region Northwest; Douglas Kot, San Diego Green Building Council; Rebecca Lewison, San Diego State University; Paulina Lis, Energy Eye, Inc.; David McGrew, Reuben H. Fleet Science Center; Kotaro Nakamura, San Diego State University; Nima Nekoui, Silver Citrus LLC Owner; Matthew Rahn, San Diego State University; Jessica Rinaman, Balboa Park Cultural Partnership ; Rory Ruppert, Balboa Park Cultural Partnership; Vinod Sasidharan, San Diego State University; Robert Thiele, Robert Thiele AIA Architect; Marlene Williams, Friends of Balboa Park; Ann Wilson, Friends of Balboa Park; Thomas Zink, San Diego State University. A list of the relevant professional credentials of each member is in this report’s Introduction. The Board of Directors of the Friends of Balboa Park for their support of such a comprehensive approach: Jim Hughes (Chair of the Board), Barbara Brown, Libby Carson, Caroline Chen, Dean Crowder, Susan Hoekenga, Todd Kinnear, Maureen Lamberti, Betty Peabody, Marvin Spira, Linda Spuck, Ken Tranbarger, Ann Wilson, Heather Xitco. The Administrative Director of the Friends of Balboa Park, Lorraine Schmalenberger, for her consistent support of many activities related to this project. Christine Kehoe, State Senator, California 39th District, Toni Atkins, Assemblymember, California 76th Assembly District, and Michael Kelly, President, The Committee of One Hundred, for helping lay the groundwork for this project. Special thanks go to the City staff of the Park and Recreation Department—Greg Armstead, Ranger Kim Duclo, Bruce Martinez, Mario Llanos, Mike Rasmusson, Ranger Ryan Robertson, Mike Tully, Bill Overstreet—and to Steve Hill of Councilman Gloria’s office for their active involvement. 3
  • 5. Final 6-21-12 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Water is a critical resource in general and for Balboa Park in particular. The Friends of Balboa Park (http://friendsofbalboapark.org/) has recognized the need for improved usage of water in Balboa Park’s parkland, meaning in areas outside the physical infrastructure/buildings. To address this need we sponsored the creation of a comprehensive plan in the form of a roadmap to achieve the goal of making the parkland “water-wise” by 2020. "Waterwise" means optimizing the use of water, thereby helping make the Park more environmentally sustainable. Decisions about the optimal use of water are based not only on reducing water usage but also on the systemic impacts of water use on other natural resources such as air, energy, soil, re-use/recycling of materials, etc. Achieving water-wise parkland will leave an important legacy for future generations. This roadmap has three additional goals: Make Balboa Park a national and international water-wise model. Provide visitors with knowledge they can apply to more wisely use water in their homes and communities. Apply a collaborative model from the field of knowledge management, a community of practice, to accomplish this project and all the ones that will follow. The approach involved assembling a group of people with expertise in water management, sustainability, and related skills into a Water-wise Community of Practice for Balboa Park’s Parkland. This model also required involving those key stakeholders who will have primary management responsibility to oversee the execution of the projects, the relevant staff from the City’s Park and Recreation Department. Working together this community generated this roadmap. The roadmap consists of a series of proposed projects that will ultimately optimize water usage. The projects are sequenced into a timeline by whether they are short-term (2012-2013), mid-term (2014-2015) or long-term (20162020). In addition five topic areas for projects were developed, recognizing the areas are inter-related:  Smartscaping: Based on intended use of each area, optimizing ecological features, e.g., flora, fauna, land terrain/drainage, sun/shade patterns, soil composition, and the provision of water.  Documentation: Mapping of existing water infrastructure along with measuring water use through audits and technology.  Water Delivery: Employing improved irrigation methods; Capturing/reclaiming water for re-use in irrigation.  Eco-tourism and Eco-education: Providing passive and active programs for visitors, students, and staff integrated under the umbrella of the “Balboa Park Center for H2O Experience”.  Program Management: Keeping the initiative integrated, updated, evaluated, and communicated. The roadmap is a living document requiring modification over time. It should be managed as a whole rather than as a set of disparate projects. One reason is that the projects are inter-related. The other is that the synergy generated by continued interaction among the community members is what provides this initiative with such positive prospects for long-term success. Needed resources include expertise, money, volunteer time, and enthusiasm. If you are interested in contributing to our call to action, please contact us at info@friendsofbalboapark.org. We serve as the conduit for these resources, including volunteers, on behalf of the Park and Recreation Department for this water-wise initiative in the parkland. 4
  • 6. Final 6-21-12 INTRODUCTION CALL TO ACTION Balboa Park is the crown jewel of San Diego. Visitors from near and far find enjoyment and inspiration within its bounds. Water is the building block of life and essential to sustaining life. As a living system, Balboa Park’s parkland depends upon natural resources, including water. Our Park faces several challenges. One is underfunding in difficult fiscal times. A recent report documented significant infrastructure deficiencies due to resource constraints including deferred maintenance costs. (Trust for Public Land, 2008b) Another is finite availability of natural resources as part of the world-wide challenge—namely how to use its natural resources in an environmentally sustainable way. Moreover, these fiscal and natural resource challenges are intertwined. Wasting natural resources wastes money and degrades the quality of life for future generations. Because mustering the resources to maintain and enhance the Park is a civic challenge, the City and concerned community groups are rallying to address this problem. One such group, the Friends of Balboa Park (FOBP), has the mission to preserve and enhance Balboa Park through a wide variety of projects (www.friendsofbalboapark.org). We support the vision of achieving environmental sustainability of the Park in order to preserve it for future generations. We determined that one specific legacy we can leave is to make more efficient and effective use of water. In partnership with Park and Recreation Department staff, we have already implemented smart controllers in the parkland’s irrigation system. Water has always been extremely valuable. Various recent trends are causing it to become even more valuable and correspondingly more expensive. Because Balboa Park exists within a desert area, its natural sources of water are very limited. Moreover, because it contains a wide variety of valuable plants, a conservative irrigation approach exists of using potable (fit for human consumption) water to protect plant health. Continuing to rely on the approach of using primarily imported and potable water to sustain the parkland is untenable, particularly since the whole region faces the same problem. With today’s state-of-the-art in water management, numerous immediate opportunities exist to reduce water waste in the Park, and thereby also hold down costs. Thankfully the state-of-the-art is rapidly advancing, so that even more improvement opportunities are anticipated over the next decade. In fact, the possibilities are extraordinary. GOALS o Produce a comprehensive plan in the form of a roadmap of proposed improvements to Balboa Park that will make its parkland water-wise by 2020. “Parkland” means the space outside the buildings/physical infrastructure. “Water-wise” means optimizing the use of water, thereby making the Park more environmentally sustainable while keeping it healthy and fit for appropriate human uses. Decisions about the optimal use of water are based not only on reducing water use but also on the systemic impacts of water use on other natural resources such as air, energy, soil, re-use/recycling of materials, etc. Understanding the Park as a living system of nature will inform water-wise projects by recognizing interdependencies and potential synergies among natural resources. 5
  • 7. o o o Final 6-21-12 Make Balboa Park a national and international water-wise model. Doing so will not only be a source of civic pride but will also attract more visitors from more places since interest in this subject is rapidly growing. By attracting more tourism, it will benefit the local business community. Provide visitors with knowledge they can apply to more wisely use water in their homes and communities. These water-wise improvements will serve as demonstrations to people coming to the Park— regular users, students, and occasional visitors—from which they can learn. Sharing knowledge will be through both passive and active (experiential) means via eco-tourism and educational programs. Apply a collaborative model, a Community of Practice, to accomplish this project and all the ones that will follow. A vast amount of knowledge exists on how to optimize water use in the form of regional, national, and international expertise. This project adopted an existing model, drawn from the field of knowledge management, as the way to facilitate the transfer of expertise into the Park in a way workable and beneficial for those officially responsible for maintaining the Park. BACKGROUND The Park history dates back to 1868 when the City of San Diego set aside 1400 acres of municipally owned lands, later reduced to 1200 acres. San Diego had a population of 2,300 people. Today the region has over 3 million people. The Park also attracts a large group of national and international visitors. The Friends of Balboa Park commissioned a study that showed how much value the City of San Diego receives from its Park and Recreation system. It concluded that “The Park system of San Diego thus provided the City with revenue of $12.5 million, city government savings of $7.3 million, resident savings of almost $1.28 billion, and a collective increase of resident wealth of almost $2.7 billion in 2007.” (Trust for Public Land, 2008a). Over much of the last 144 years, concern had ebbed and flowed regarding the San Diego region’s limited source of water, and actions to address the problem have been sporadic. The lifeblood of the Park, water, is in jeopardy, and insufficient attention or planning has been given to the Park’s sustainable future with respect to water, its use, reuse and distribution. However, in recent years public awareness has been raised about the value of water. This shift enabled FOBP to assemble a group of highly knowledgeable and enthusiastic volunteers who rapidly coalesced to create this roadmap. The Balboa Park Master Plan (BPMP) 1989 / 2004 recognized the need to be concerned with its physical resources. The planning principles are “to nurture and enhance the cultural, recreational and passive resources of the Park to meet the needs of the region and surrounding community while respecting its physical, cultural and historical environment.” Among other things the BPMP called for siting a water reclamation facility within the Park to service the Park. “Water reclamation shall be employed to protect the horticulture against the possibility of severe water shortages.” Links to the Master Plan and the Precise Plans that provide details can be found at: www.sandiego.gov/park-and-recreation/generalinfo/consultantguide.shtml. In October 2011, the San Diego City Council passed a Comprehensive Policy for a Sustainable Water Supply in San Diego, Policy No 400-15. Using this policy as a guide for proposed projects will assist in further developing the overall Water-wise Roadmap. Last but not least, the City is sponsoring a major 2015 centennial celebration of the Panama-California Exposition www.balboapark.org/2015/centennial-celebration. This offers a once-in-a-century opportunity to provide legacies for future generations so they can continue to benefit from the riches that Balboa Park offers. 6
  • 8. Final 6-21-12 APPROACH 1. Gathering information on opportunities to improve water use. 2. Assembling a knowledgeable group of experts. A formal Water-wise Community of Practice for Balboa Park’s Parkland was formed, based on a recognized model for creating collaboration from the field of knowledge management. (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002) This model also requires involving those key stakeholders who will have primary management responsibility to oversee the execution of the projects in the roadmap, namely the relevant staff from the City’s Park and Recreation Department. 3. Applying this expert knowledge about opportunities to address these needs by developing a wide variety of ideas for projects. 4. Culling, combining, and adding projects as needed so that the roadmap responds to the most pressing needs, and availability of resources. 5. Writing up projects in the form of short and long versions as appropriate for different audiences. 6. Establishing that the roadmap is a series of project proposals. After publication of this roadmap, each project will be developed into a more detailed project proposal, resources will be raised, and approval will be obtained from the Park and Recreation Department and other City entities as required. 7. Producing and publishing this roadmap in the form of a timeline of the projects in sequence of short, mid, and long-term accompanied by brief project descriptions. 8. Establishing that the roadmap is a living document. Since conditions change, it is expected that some of the specific projects in the roadmap will be changed through elimination, addition, and modification. 9. Establishing a mechanism to accomplish two functions on a semi-annual basis: (a) assess progress against the roadmap; (b) modify the roadmap to reflect current conditions. MAJOR FINDINGS REGARDING PARKLAND OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVED WATER USE o o o o o The Park has been used for many purposes by many constituencies over many years. The resulting changes have not always been made systematically. Examples include plantings in locations that do not fit with the surrounding ecology and hardscape (sidewalks, parking lots, structures) that have been placed directly over critical water pipes. Not all these changes to the Park have been fully documented as they were made. The result is incomplete and sometimes inaccurate information about what has been put into the Park. Examples include pipes, valves, hardscape, structures, and plants. Lack of knowledge about what is where, available to all those who need it, is a serious impediment to optimal water management. Alternative types of water besides potable quality are available for potential use in the Park but the feasibility of using these resources must be studied and then a number of changes in infrastructure will have to be made. Non-potable water resources include storm water, recycled/gray water, and black water. Some of the water infrastructure, such as pipes and valves, is old and some of that is deteriorating, resulting in leakage. The amount of water lost to leakage is unknown. When leaks are patched in conventional ways vs. using state-of-the-art methods and materials, it sometimes later creates downstream leakage. Because there are only a small number of official water meters that measure most of the water use in the entire Park, it is not possible to easily measure the water usage in any particular area. While installation of many more official meters is cost-prohibitive, there are methods available now as well as under development for measuring water use in specific areas. 7
  • 9. Final 6-21-12 ROADMAP STRUCTURE The roadmap consists of a series of projects sequenced as short-term (2012-2013), mid-term (2014-2015), and longterm (2016-2020). The sequence of implementing the projects in the roadmap will be both strategic and tactical. The projects are grouped into the following five subject areas based on the roadmap’s goals:  Smartscaping: Based on intended use of each area, optimizing ecological features, e.g., flora, fauna, land terrain/drainage, sun/shade patterns, soil composition, and the provision of water.  Documentation: Mapping of existing water infrastructure along with measuring water use through audits and technology.  Water Delivery: Employing improved irrigation methods; Capturing/reclaiming water for re-use in irrigation.  Eco-tourism and Eco-education: Providing passive and active programs for visitors, students, and staff integrated under the umbrella of the “Balboa Park Center for H2O Experience”.  Program Management: Keeping the initiative integrated, updated, evaluated, and communicated. The title of each project is shown in the color-coded timeline. The section immediately following the timeline contains a summary description of each project. ROADMAP STRATEGY - WATER-WISE SMARTSCAPE In order to achieve this challenging goal, a strategy is required so that projects will be done in a logical and efficient order. It recognizes the parkland as being a living system. This “water-wise smartscape strategy” avoids a patchwork approach which often is cheaper in the short-run but costly in the long-run. o o o o o o Grid the Park into geographic areas based on existing official plans and/or visitor usage patterns. Determine the dominant human usage patterns for each area and also if there is an existing designation. For example, Florida Canyon is officially designated as a “native” area. Assess and state what the purpose of each area is and/or should be. The opportunities and requirements for optimized water use will be factored into the purpose based on the intended ecology and landscape. For instance the purposes differ significantly between canyons; cultural experiences; dog parks; sports; and nature experiences. Even the Arizona Landfill area offers opportunities: in the short-term to educate people about the impact of waste and short-term planning, and in the long-term for the community to coalesce in restoring valuable parkland in the heart of our City. Document the ecological features and the water delivery systems that exist in the area. Examples of ecological features include flora, fauna, human use, land terrain/drainage, sun/shade patterns, and soil composition. Water delivery systems include both natural ones, such as rain and marine moisture, and manmade irrigation methods. Design the necessary changes to the ecological features to match the designated purpose of the area. For example, if a few water-hungry plants exist in the middle of an expanse of otherwise drought-resistant plants, they should be removed or moved to a compatible area. Design/re-design water-wise usage and delivery methods around the new ecological features. Two components to this exist. One is using the least costly type and source of water that satisfies all the requirements of the features and use of the area, e.g., rain water, gray water, or treated run-off water may be options. The other is more efficient infrastructure, e.g., pipes, sprinklers, valves, and water reclamation devices. The new water delivery infrastructure will incorporate the most cost-effective and state-of-the-art components. 8
  • 10. o o o Final 6-21-12 For example, when pipes are leaking, they should be replaced with long-lasting water-tight materials accompanied by sensors that monitor leakage. Implement the changes to ecological features and water delivery methods simultaneously. Assess and monitor the impacts of the changes. Collect the knowledge built from these projects and share it with Park visitors and staff. This knowledge is shared by offering programs to students and Park visitors that enable them to apply this knowledge in their own homes and communities. ROADMAP TACTICS – MEET IMMEDIATE NEEDS While we intend to introduce a systematic strategy to improve water use, we recognize that immediate needs in the Park also must be met. To help the City respond to these needs, certain projects will be undertaken right away and on an as-needed basis going forward. Examples include production of better maps of water-related infrastructure in Park areas; measurement of water delivery in selected Park areas; and rainwater collection for use in the Kate Sessions Nursery. COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE MEMBERS AND RELEVANT EXPERTISE The membership of our water-wise community is what ensures the success of this project. Collectively our members have extraordinary breadth and depth of expertise related to water management and related aspects of environmental sustainability. They care deeply about Balboa Park and enthusiastically volunteered to apply their knowledge and skills to this project. Moreover, their spirit of cooperation and collaboration is the extra ingredient that enabled the production of this roadmap in a very short period of time. Greg Armstead is Grounds Maintenance Supervisor with the City of San Diego in the Central Mesa of Balboa Park. He has 10 years of grounds maintenance experience, and previously worked for the California Conservation Corps, with horticultural classwork at Cuyamaca College. Before he became Supervisor with the City of San Diego, he worked as a Grounds Maintenance Worker II in the Desert Garden in Balboa Park, where he participated in the creation of a Geographic Information System (GIS) for the Desert Garden. He and his staff are eager and excited about making Balboa Park 100% sustainable and efficient. Ravi Bajaj is Project Coordinator for the San Diego Green Building Council. This organization has the vision that our buildings and communities will regenerate and sustain the health and vitality of all life within a generation. Alexandria Bennett, Sustainability Coordinator of Point Loma Nazarene University, is experienced in water, energy and waste conservation and management. She has an undergraduate degree in Business and Industrial Technology and is a LEED Green Associate. Laurie Broedling, President of LB Organizational Consulting, is a consultant and trainer in methods to improve organizational effectiveness through collaboration and process improvement. She has a Ph.D. in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from George Washington University and a B.A. from Brown University. She has been a Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Associate Administrator of NASA, and Senior Vice President of McDonnell Douglas. She served on the Board of Directors of the Friends of Balboa Park and has pursued Park environmental issues for several years. Katie Carl has a B.S. degree in Structural Engineering from UCSD, and is currently an Engineering Teacher at the School of Science and Technology (San Diego High). At San Diego High School, she is the Academy Coordinator for a new 9
  • 11. Final 6-21-12 Green Engineering Academy (GeoTech). In addition, she is the staff advisor for Solar Cup and ACE Mentor Programs at SDHS. She has prior work experience in construction management, where she received her LEED Accreditation. Kim Duclo received his B.A. degree in Communications/Visual Arts from the University of California, San Diego. He has been a Park Ranger for the City of San Diego since 1996, based out of Balboa Park. During his tenure in the Park, he has conducted over 500 tours highlighting the botanical heritage of this National Historic Landmark. Over the past two decades, Kim has amassed a Balboa Park archive comprised of some 10,000 items, including a wide array of horticultural documents. Kennedy Gammage has an AB degree in English from U.C. Berkeley. His work experience includes more than 20 years in advertising, marketing communications, public relations and corporate communications. Bob Gilleskie has more than 35 years’ experience in energy management, including 20 years at San Diego Gas & Electric, where he held various managerial positions in energy management and power quality. Most recently he was the Director of Engineering at the California Center for Sustainable Energy, and he is currently the Regional Energy Manager for Marine Corps Installations West. He has authored numerous articles and papers on both power quality and energy technologies, and has spoken at conferences and seminars in Europe and the United States on these subjects. He was instrumental in developing a Sustainability Certificate program at the University of California at San Diego Extension School, and he currently teaches several of the courses in the program. He is a registered Professional Engineer (Electrical) in the state of California, a Certified Energy Manager, and LEED Accredited Professional (AP). He is a graduate of the Naval Academy, and has Master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, and Business Administration from San Diego State University. Richard Graff, owner Richard Graff Designs, is a User Interface/User Experience Designer consultant. His background is in architecture which he practiced for several years prior to entering the world of the web. Richard spent many years working for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) in San Diego. As a consultant, he continues to work on an array of projects including Knowledge Management, Change Management and web application front-end design assignments. He has been a volunteer for the Friends of Balboa Park since 1999. Len Hering, retired Navy Rear Admiral, was formerly Commander of Navy Region Southwest and Navy Region Northwest, and recently the VP for Business Services and Administration at the University of San Diego. A staunch advocate for sustainability, he has been recognized at the federal, state and local levels for his efforts to make sure our resources are used wisely. He achieved savings of more than 30 million gallons of water to date throughout the region by instituting smart programs and conservation measures. Stephen Hill is District 3 Councilmember Todd Gloria’s Senior Policy Advisor and liaison to Balboa Park. He has over 20 years’ experience working for elected officials at the state and local levels. Doug Kot is the Executive Director of the San Diego Green Building Council. This organization has the vision that our buildings and communities will regenerate and sustain the health and vitality of all life within a generation. Rebecca Lewison is an Associate Professor in the Biology Department at San Diego State University and the Director of the Institute for Ecological Monitoring and Management. Dr. Lewison received her BA from Vassar College and her PhD in Ecology from University of California, Davis. As a conservation ecologist, Dr. Lewison's area of expertise focuses on the impact of resource and land use on vulnerable species and systems. Paulina Lis has a Bachelor’s Degree in Hospitality Management with Honors in Tourism Management from Napier University in Edinburgh, Scotland. After moving to the US, Paulina has been broadening her interests in Sustainable 10
  • 12. Final 6-21-12 Tourism development by accomplishing a Sustainable Business Practices Certificate at UCSD extension and receiving a LEED Green Associate accreditation. Currently she is working for a local manufacturer of Energy Management systems and volunteering with the San Diego Green Building Council to create a local Sustainable Destination Committee. As a North Park resident, she is passionate about Balboa Park and its value to the local community. Mario Llanos is currently the Balboa Park Horticulturist for the City of San Diego. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Horticultural Science from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo and an Associate of Science degree in Ornamental Horticulture from Cuyamaca College. Prior to his current position with the City, he served as a general manager for a wholesale nursery specializing in specimen palms and a high end Maintenance firm. He has more than 15 years’ experience in nursery management and landscape construction and maintenance. Stanley Maloy is Dean of the College of Sciences at San Diego State University (SDSU). He has a PhD in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry from the University of California at Irvine. Prior to joining SDSU he was a professor of Microbiology at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign for 18 years. He was elected President of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), a scientific society with over 43,000 members, and financial resources over $100M. He is currently chair of the ASM committee on communicating science to the public. He has consulted with large agricultural and pharmaceutical companies and small biotech companies, including as a member of Scientific Advisory Boards and as Chief Scientific Officer of Vaxiion Therapeutics Inc. He has served on federal review panels and advisory groups, and has testified before the United States House Appropriations Committee. He has worked extensively with the San Diego community, serving on Boards for the San Diego Science Festival, the San Diego Ethics Center, San Diego Science Alliance, and has volunteered for many other organizations. Bruce Martinez earned a BA in Recreation Administration from SDSU. He has worked with the City of San Diego Park and Recreation Dept. for 25 years. Currently he is the District Manager for Balboa Park Operations. He manages the Maintenance staff, Ranger staff and works closely with the philanthropic groups to facilitate projects for Balboa Park, Mission Hills Park and Presidio Park. David McGrew, Director of Engineering and Facilities at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, is a graduate of San Diego State University with a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics. David was the project manager for the Reuben H. Fleet’s LEED Silver certification, completed in 2010. Kotaro Nakamura is an American architect who was born and raised in Japan. He is an associate professor in the School of Art, Design, and Art History at San Diego State University and has run an architectural design office in downtown San Diego for 30 years. He has an extensive knowledge of energy efficiency and environmentally sensitive design methods from his environmental engineering and design background. His research work involves different types of architectural vernacular that had adapted to area specific climate conditions and available materials. He has traveled to Norway to study and document sod roofed 18th Century Norwegian Farmhouses, 10th century Native American Cliff Dwellings at Mesa Verde at Colorado, and Japanese traditional Teahouses in Osaka, Japan. Nima Nekoui received his BS in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego and is the owner and operator of SilverCitrus, LLC, a San Diego based technology solutions company offering services nationwide ranging from website design, programming, and product development to technology administration, education, and productivity. SilverCitrus is responsible for creating and running the online collaborative work space for this project. Nima also teaches mathematics and logic to foreign, non-native English-speaking students at the American Language Institute at San Diego State University. 11
  • 13. Final 6-21-12 Bill Overstreet is Grounds Maintenance Supervisor in Balboa Park. He has worked for the City of San Diego since 1996 and has been a Supervisor in Balboa Park since August 1999. He has more than 20 years of grounds maintenance experience in the private sector which includes irrigation installation and repair. Betty Peabody has a long career as civic-minded volunteer, including volunteering in Balboa Park for 43 years. A few of her notable activities include current service on the boards of Friends of Balboa Park, San Diego County Crime Stoppers, Friends of the Library (SDSU), and Rees-Steely Research Foundation; co-founder of the Friends of Balboa Park and the Balboa Park Alliance (BPAL); and past president of Museum of Man Auxiliary (Klee Wyk Society), House of Hospitality, and Balboa Park Millennium Society. She has received numerous awards, such as Woman of Dedication, Mortar Board Honoree, and Honorary Member of Rotary Club of San Diego. Dr. Matt Rahn is the Director for Research and Education with the SDSU Field Stations Program, and the Academic Advisor for the Environmental Sciences Program. He has nearly two decades of experience in applied sciences and policy, with an emphasis on research design, statistics, environmental science, public policy, and law. Much of his work has focused on the interface between science and policy, supporting state and federal programs in collaboration with environmental lawyers and scientists on the design, implementation, and evaluation of environmental impact reports, multi-species conservation plans, endangered species protection programs, watershed management plans, and land use planning. He has a BS and MS in Biology from the University of Nevada, a Ph.D. in Ecology from UC Davis, and will be completing his JD in environmental law this year. Michael Rasmusson is a City of San Diego employee who has been involved with the Park & Recreation Department for 23 years. He has worked at Mission Bay, the City-wide Landscape Crew, the Park Forestry Crew, the Botanical Building, the Kate Sessions Nursery, and the Central Crew in Balboa Park. He was also a judge for the 2012 Spring Home & Garden Show, which involves landscape design with drought tolerant plant material. Jessica Rinaman is the Program Coordinator, Environmental Sustainability of the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership. She works closely with Partnership members, the City of San Diego, San Diego Gas & Electric and other Park stakeholders to advance solutions that will help protect Park resources and strengthen economic viability, while enhancing staff and visitor experience. Jessica graduated with a degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing from the University of San Diego and is currently enrolled in University of California, San Diego’s, Sustainable Business Practices extension program. Since joining the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership, she has been involved in facilitating over $3 million in energy efficiency upgrades to historic Balboa Park buildings and developing professional education opportunities for Park staff and the public. Ryan Robertson has an Associate’s Degree from Grossmont College in Physical Geography, and a B.S. degree from SDSU in Recreation Administration with emphasis on outdoor recreation. He has been a Ranger for the City of San Diego for the past five years, and during that time has overseen multiple small and large scale non-native vegetation removal projects and associated re-vegetation processes utilizing native plants. He worked to oversee and implement a watering and monitoring schedule to ensure the establishment and long term survival of the native plants, which are primarily planted in areas of the Park that have no irrigation. Rory Ruppert is the Director of Environmental Sustainability for the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership. She advances strategic planning initiatives related to Balboa Park’s environmental and economic sustainability to protect Park resources and strengthen economic viability, while enhancing staff and visitor experience. She works closely with the Partnership's member institutions, Park stakeholders, the City of San Diego and sustainability experts to coordinate and implement these initiatives. She has more than 25 years of experience in nonprofit and civic organization management and holds an MA in Nonprofit Management and Leadership from University of San Diego. 12
  • 14. Final 6-21-12 Vinod Sasidharan, Ph.D., is Past President of the Great Western Travel and Tourism Research Association and the California Society of Park and Recreation Educators. He currently serves on the Education Resource Council for Hostelling International and has served on the Destination Marketing Association International Student and Educator Advisory Council. Dr. Sasidharan’s research includes the evaluation and implementation of grass-roots tourism initiatives, involving local community participation in planning and decision making for sustainable tourism development, sustainability assessment and Corporate Social Responsibility evaluation in tourism. He holds a Master’s Degree in Tourism Policy and Management from the University of Birmingham, UK and a Doctorate in Recreation and Tourism Management from The Pennsylvania State University, USA. His studies have been funded/supported by federal agencies including the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, United States Department of Interior (USDI), National Park Service, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Peace Corps, and nationally-renowned philanthropic agencies such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Alan Sweedler is Assistant Vice President for International Programs at San Diego State University, where he is also Professor of Physics and Director of the Environmental Sciences Program. He is a specialist on energy systems analysis and the relationship between energy and water use. Professor Sweedler serves on the Board of Directors of Clean Tech San Diego and is a former Congressional Science Fellow, serving in the U.S. Senate. Robert Thiele is a native San Diego architect, who graduated from Arizona State University in 1971 with a degree in Environmental Design. He is a LEED Accredited Professional, and has a passion for sustainable practices in the built and natural environment. Robert currently serves on the Board of the San Diego Green Building Council and is the Facilitator for the San Diego Living Building Challenge Collaborative. Michael Tully is Grounds Maintenance Manager, and began his career with the City of San Diego in 1995 as a Grounds Maintenance Worker in Balboa Park. His work experience includes programming, trouble shooting and ensuring functionality of Toro Sentinel smart controllers in Balboa Park, with 17 years of work experience in irrigation installation and repair. Marlene Williams, Volunteer Coordinator for Friends of Balboa Park, has been a historian for more than 20 years, and textile artist of more than 25 years. As the Council Liaison for Girl Scouts San Diego, she has played a major role in transitioning the property of Girl Scouts in San Diego to sustainable practices, including water conservation and reclamation, and addressing 3M dollars in deferred maintenance. A training specialist and volunteer serving on many committees with the Red Cross and Girl Scouts, she has received several awards for her volunteer and community service. Marlene is a former board member for Friends of Balboa Park. Ann Wilson is Treasurer and Board Member of Friends of Balboa Park. She has been part of the Friends since 2008. A CPA and CFE (Certified Fraud Examiner), Ann has maintained a CPA practice, specializing in forensic accounting, fraud investigation and expert witness assignments in accounting, finance, fraud and economic damages for over 25 years. She holds a BA in Psychology from UC Berkeley and an MBA in accounting from UCLA. Ann has been a Balboa Park user and lover since the age of 3. Tom Zink is Program Manager for the Soil Ecology and Restoration Group, a research organization at San Diego State University (SDSU) that specializes in native habitat restoration. He is an Ecology professor in the Biology Department and Applied Hydraulics instructor in the Civil Engineering Department at SDSU. He has served as an expert witness in habitat restoration for the United Nations, Geneva and the State of California, and as restoration ecologist for both the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. He has also served as a panel member for Kew Royal Botanical Gardens at the World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies in 2010 concerning the restoration of damaged desert soils. 13
  • 15. Final 6-21-12 CONCLUSION This roadmap embodies the goal of a comprehensive plan of proposed improvements to Balboa Park that will make its parkland water-wise by 2020. The use of the community of practice model was shown to be very effective. A disparate group of community experts successfully coalesced with each other and City staff to produce this plan in two months. The roadmap is a living document requiring modification over time. It must be managed as an integrated whole rather than as a collection of individual projects for two reasons. One is that the projects are inter-related. The other is that the synergy generated by continued interaction among the community members is what provides this initiative with such positive prospects for long-term success. The people who created this roadmap represent only a small percentage of those in our region with resources to contribute to making Balboa Park’s parkland water-wise. Needed resources include expertise, money, volunteer time, and enthusiasm. If you are interested in contributing to our call to action, please contact us at info@friendsofbalboapark.org. We serve as the conduit for these resources, including volunteers, on behalf of the Park and Recreation Department for the water-wise initiative. 14
  • 16. Final 6-21-12 REFERENCES The Trust for Public Land. (2008a). How Much Value Does the City of San Diego Receive from its Park and Recreation System? The Trust for Public Land. (2008b). The Soul of San Diego: Keeping Balboa Park Magnificent In its Second Century. http://friendsofbalboapark.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/thesoulofsandiego.pdf Wenger, E., R. McDermott, & Wm. Snyder. (2002). Cultivating Communities of Practice. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. 15
  • 17. S= S martscaping D = Documentation W = Water Delivery E = Eco-tourism and Eco-education P = Program Management TIMELINE Shor t T er m (2012 - 2013) S martscape Land Use Zones Project: Perform the first several steps in the S martscape S trategy, starting with marking the park into grids. S S martscape the Lily Pond Area: Apply all the steps in the strategy. Plant Material Fund: Establish a plant material fund to buy drought-tolerant plants for the park, including the nursery bank. Water Mapping Project: Map the city water mains and other related D infrastructure in selected park zones as a key first step in understanding water use in the park. M id T er m (2014 - 2015) Landscape Design Project: Create the most realistic horticultural/landscape elements and appropriate sustainable irrigation for selected zones in the grid—ones that match the area’s purpose and intended ecology. S martscape (continued): Apply strategy to more parkland areas, e.g., Marston Addition. S martscape Grape S Park: Create a small water-wise native garden t attractive to neighbors and visitors. Oak Grove Project: Create an oak grove in the Volunteer Garden: Create a water-wise garden in area between the Trees for Health Garden and Golden Hill Fountain Grotto Project: Restore the S martscape (continued): Apply smartscape strategy to more parkland areas, e.g., Florida Canyon conjunction with potential living house the Campfire Campus that will be an attractive self- 102 year-old Golden Hill Fountain Grotto. and/or area at 20th and B S t. demonstration project(s) in the park. sustainable landscape with stable soil. Demonstration Garden at Kate S essions Nursery: Create a sustainable demonstration garden to highlight water-wise practices. Bird Park Project: Complete this playful artistic outdoor experience begun several years ago, and in the process incorporate water-wise elements. Efficient Wide S pray Irrigation: Install more efficient wide spray systems in appropriate areas. Deep Root Irrigation: Improve the irrigation of Below Ground Irrigation: Install below ground selected plants and trees in appropriate areas with S Irrigation: Introduce use of spot irrigation pot irrigation systems in appropriate areas of the park. systems designed to deliver water directly to systems in appropriate areas. where it is absorbed. S Use of Fertigation: S ystematically investigate the The “Root Ball”: Hold a major charity event to feasibility of using fertigation methods in selected raise funds for water-wise plants and activities in areas of the park and apply those methods if the park. appropriate. Non-intrusive Water Measuring Devices: Use state-of-the-art technology to measure amount of Mapping and Auditing (continued) water usage based on differing signatures of the water flow. Irrigation Mapping and Auditing Project Zone 2: Determine expected water Water and Irrigation Mapping and Auditing (continued) use by the irrigation system. Investigation of Irrigation S ystem Alternatives: S tudy more efficient options for existing irrigation Drip Irrigation: Introduce use of drip systems in and possible future irrigation to save water and appropriate areas. improve plant health. W Long T er m (2016 - 2020) Marston Addition S martscape: Restore an area of 6th Avenue S lope Garden: Create a garden to the park to a composition of native species which demonstrate sustainable gardening practices on can be sustained by natural water supply and steep slopes. supplemented by efficient irrigation if needed. Irrigation Alternatives (continued) Irrigation Alternatives (continued) Water Collection (continued): Collect rainwater and air conditioning condensate for irrigation. D Water Collection (continued): Collect rainwater and air conditioning condensate for irrigation. W S low Release Irrigation: Introduce use of slow release irrigation systems in appropriate areas. Improved Use of S mart Controllers: Develop a comprehensive approach to the water needs of Water Delivery to Key Gardens: Implement more the park using data mining and application efficient irrigation methods in selected key Park Infrastructure Water-wise Pilot Program: Perform initial implementation of living system via water reclamation. gathered from smart irrigation controllers already gardens. in the park. Final Implementation of Park Water Treatment Infrastructure: Maximize reclamation of all types of water. Water Reclamation Vision Plan: Create a water reclamation plan that would bring true water sustainability to the park. Water Collection: Collect rainwater and air conditioning condensate for irrigation, starting with collection and usage of rain water in the greenhouses at the Kate S essions Nursery. Water Delivery Infrastructure Upgrades (continued) Water Delivery Infrastructure Upgrades: Repair or replace aging infrastructure (e.g., pipes, valves) that delivers water to key areas in the park’s Central Mesa. Water Delivery Infrastructure Upgrades (continued) Center for “H2O Experience” – Phase 1: Create an (initially) virtual sustainability center where staff, visitors, educators, students, and volunteers Drinking Water in Balboa Park: S ignificantly improve the sustainability of the Center for “H2O Experience” – Phase 2. Continue programs from Phase 1 and add the programs described in the following four projects. can learn water-wise practices and also participate in hands-on water-wise way people access drinking water in the park, e.g. with hydration stations. activities and improvements in the park. Water-wise S cavenger Hunt: Educate elementary school-age children about the water-wise activities taking place in the park in a fun and entertaining manner. Green Movie Nights: Increase use of the park at night and promote it to young adult audiences with sustainability-focused movies, food trucks, etc. Water-Wise Programs via Institutions’ Educational Initiatives: Create E water-wise curricula in partnership with Balboa Park Institutions and other institutions in S Diego with an interest in water use. an Brand for Water-wise in Balboa Park: Create a logo, message, “hub” to streamline activities and communication Public Database of Water-wise Activities under H2O Experience: Include webpage, Facebook, Twitter P Water-wise S cavenger Hunt: Add a program geared to teens. Educate school-age children about the water-wise activities taking place in the park in a fun and entertaining manner. Water Mascot for Balboa Park: Create a mascot such as S mokey the Bear, 2015 Educational Event S eries: Engage world recognized experts and celebrities to speak about water sustainability, thereby attracting national and children’s competition for artwork, local artist art submission, possible international visitors. gala, logo, figures, and merchandise Marston House 2015 Exhibit: Create an exhibit of the history of water sustainability at the Marston Property. S ocial Networking Opportunities for Engagement: Integrate GIS mapping with social networking opportunities for engagement to entice visitation (forestry software linkage) Ongoing Communications: Communicate roadmap milestones and accomplishments while expanding the water-wise community. Lecture S eries: Educate visitors and the local community about sustainable, water-wise practices. Needs Assessment: Create a database of waterwise educational activities in Balboa Park (tours, gardens, institution exhibits, educational programs…) Ongoing Program Oversight: Integrate, update, and evaluate roadmap progress. Center for “H2O Experience” – Phase 3 E Ongoing Communications: Communicate roadmap Ongoing Program Oversight: Integrate, update, milestones and accomplishments while expanding and evaluate roadmap progress. the water-wise community. P Water-wise 2015 Tour: S how visitors the water-wise accomplishments to date, as well as the challenges to make the park water-wise by 2020. Marston Addition S martscape Tours: Organize water-wise tours at this location. Ongoing Communications: Communicate roadmap milestones and accomplishments while expanding the water-wise community. Shor t T er m (2012 - 2013) Ongoing Program Oversight: Integrate, update, and evaluate roadmap progress. M id T er m (2014 - 2015) 16 Long T er m (2016 - 2020)
  • 18. Final 6-21-12 SUMMARY PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS SMARTSCAPE LAND USE ZONES  SMARTSCAPE Perform the first several steps in the Smartscape Strategy and then pick a few selected areas to undertake the full smartscaping strategy. o o o Grid the Park into geographic areas based on existing zones, official plans, and/or visitor usage patterns. (See Figure A, following page, for the zones on the Balboa Park Master Plan.) Determine the dominant human usage patterns for each area and also if there is an existing designation. For example, Florida Canyon is officially designated as a “native” area. Assess and state what the purpose of each area is and/or should be. The opportunities and requirements for optimized water use will be factored into the purpose based on the intended ecology and landscape. For instance the purposes differ significantly between canyons; cultural experiences; dog parks; sports; and nature experiences. Even the Arizona Landfill area offers an opportunity: in the short-term to educate people about the impact of waste and short-term planning, and in the long-term for the community to coalesce in restoring valuable parkland in the heart of our City. LANDSCAPE DESIGN  SMARTSCAPE This project is an extension of the project to smartscape the Park by implementing the strategy in selected places in the Park. It will start by using the grid map created in that project. The purpose of the project is to create the most realistic planting system for Balboa Park while incorporating water sustainable practices. The gardens of Balboa Park have been planted over the decades, well before water sustainable practices were considered. Planting in other areas of the Park in addition to the gardens has occurred as well. As a result, many plant species are not suitable for the climate and require more water than current limitations mandate. However, with the present-day technology, it is possible to transition the Park to a planting and irrigation system that would use the limited water in a more resourceful manner. Also using the land use zones in the grid map will provide a time saving method for Park staff to systematically track each section on the grid, allowing supervisors to more easily budget staff labor, expenses for landscape, irrigation systems, etc. LILY POND SMARTSCAPE  SMARTSCAPE This project is a very specific application of the project to smartscape the Park by implementing the strategy in a selected place in the Park. The Lily Pond Garden is a beloved, highly visible and heavily trafficked area. The current landscape requires large amounts of water. We intend to transition it to a Smartscape, creating a self-sustainable garden in the Lily Pond area by gradually transitioning plantings to the desired low water varieties. Many of the plants are already available in the Kate Sessions Nursery. 17
  • 19. Final 6-21-12 FIGURE A 18
  • 20. Final 6-21-12 SMARTSCAPE GRAPE STREET PARK  SMARTSCAPE We intend to create a California Native Garden at the Grape St Park. The area of the Grape Street Park was previously a congregation site for illegal activities. The increased positive activity resulting from its use as a Dog Park has improved the area, and a smartscape would be attractive for residents and visitors to the Dog Park area. We will perform a general clean up, and removal of dead trees, replacing them with oak trees, weed and mulch, and plant a water-wise native garden. PLANT MATERIAL FUND  SMARTSCAPE We intend to establish a fund to buy water-wise plants for the Park through the City’s Kate Sessions Nursery. One of the drivers of this fund will be the “Root Ball.” We will also fundraise through the Center for “H2O Experience,” via the Friends of Balboa Park and other charitable organizations, and using “Donate Now” buttons on the various Park websites. As instant fundraising through Apps and QR Codes becomes more prevalent, we will also utilize these channels for this key “water-wise” fund during the 2015 centennial. DEMONSTRATION GARDEN AT KATE SESSIONS NURSERY  SMARTSCAPE We plan to transition a section of land in the Kate Sessions City nursery to a display garden that will demonstrate sustainable practices, including efficient water use. There is a slope along the east fence line in the Nursery area, several feet wide that would be suitable for planting a display garden. A self-sustainable display garden in the nursery area can be used to train/evaluate new employees and potential volunteers. A plant identification class will be held as part of the training process as well as training on the sign-engraving machine. We will clear the intended area, prepare the soil, install irrigation and plant a variety of native and low water plants. As the plants mature, they could provide clippings that are rooted for new plants. The budget for this project would be in the range of $4-8K, and completely dependent on the design of the gardens and plant selected. WATER MAPPING  DOCUMENTATION We intend to map the City water mains and other related infrastructure in selected Park zones as a key first step in understanding water use in the Park. The Water Mapping Project is a short term, no cost, high value project that will bring immediate benefit to Park and Recreation Staff and provide educational opportunities for colleges and universities and eco-tourism to explore Balboa Park as a living laboratory. The Mapping Project is the foundation of an interactive map that can be used for multiple purposes, from informing the public on kiosks to operation dashboards for institutions and Park management staff. IRRIGATION MAPPING AND AUDITING PROJECT ZONE 2  DOCUMENTATION The purpose of this project is to establish a procedure for recording the location of all sprinkler heads on the landscaping of Balboa Park. By using sprinkler head characteristics and irrigation schedules, it will enable the 19
  • 21. Final 6-21-12 determination of expected water use by the irrigation system. It involves the use hard audits to measure how much water is being used before and after irrigation improvements. The irrigation system of Balboa Park has been built up over the decades piecemeal, as conditions warranted, resulting in a system consisting of an uncertain number and location of sprinkler heads. As a result, it is difficult, if not impossible, to determine the amount of water being used for irrigation given the characteristics of the system. This, in turn, makes it difficult to know if the irrigation system is using too much water, or to establish conservation programs to save water. The first part of this project will focus on mapping Zone 2 – that irrigation zone bordered by 6th Avenue on the west, Laurel Street on the south, Upas Street on the north, and extending east to the vicinity of Balboa Park Drive. The product of the effort will be a spreadsheet consisting of sprinkler head designations, and columns designating GPS coordinates, sprinkler head type and characteristics, and flow rates. The Balboa Park Grounds Maintenance Department will conduct a 2-3 hour training session for 2-5 people on the different types of sprinkler heads that are used on Park grounds. The emphasis should be recognition as opposed to technical, i.e., the people should be able to recognize by inspection which of the commonly used sprinkler heads is used at a given location. Grounds Maintenance will also assist in developing an Excel spread sheet that will be used to capture the characteristics of each sprinkler head observed. Also, a representative from Grounds Maintenance will describe the operation of a GPS handheld device which will be used to record the location of each sprinkler head. INVESTIGATION OF IRRIGATION SYSTEM ALTERNATIVES  WATER DELIVERY As a general rule, spray irrigation is less efficient than other available methods. At a minimum, it is worth investigating whether to replace existing spray irrigation methods that exist in various areas in the Park. It is also worth investigating using alternative irrigation methods wherever the smartscaping efforts have determined that irrigation needs to be added. The following is a list of alternatives to spray irrigation. Several of them have their own project descriptions in this roadmap. o o o o o o o o o Drip irrigation Below ground irrigation Deep root irrigation Improved use of smart controllers Spot irrigation using individual nozzles that provide a specific amount of water at a specific time, normally on a timer controlled system. Efficient wide spray irrigation Improved timing of irrigation during the day/night to minimize evaporation. Use of slow release irrigation from buried clay pot containers or the use of “dry water”. Water delivery infrastructure upgrades to reduce waste through leakage DRIP IRRIGATION  WATER DELIVERY The purpose of this project is to improve the irrigation of selected plants in the Park with systems designed to deliver water more directly through drip systems, thereby reducing wasted water and improving plant health. Among other things drip irrigation systems, compared to spray systems, reduce the amount of water lost to 20
  • 22. Final 6-21-12 evaporation. Drip irrigation is one of the alternative water delivery systems that will be considered as part of the smartscaping strategy. EFFICIENT WIDE SPRAY IRRIGATION METHOD PROJECT  WATER DELIVERY We plan to improve the efficiency of water delivery through existing wide spray systems (which spray water in a sweeping motion around a wide space). These improved systems can save water and improve plant health, particularly in large green spaces, by delivering a series of water streams rather than a steady one, thereby reducing the time for watering, producing smarter delivery patterns tailored to the terrain being watered, avoiding over-watering, surface erosion and ‘puddling’ while maintaining the amount of water needed for plant health. An advisory group of experts will be formed to help City staff select the targeted area and to provide them the information necessary to write good specifications for the system. Areas that might be amenable are ones with existing sweeping systems in and around sporting areas or dog parks on the East Mesa. The change would be monitored as part of a study to assess the effects of changing over to this type of irrigation system. Improvements in water usage in that particular area will be measured, requiring the installation of a temporary water measurement device. If the expected benefits accrue, additional improved wide spray irrigation systems will be installed where needed between 2016-2020. BELOW GROUND IRRIGATION SYSTEM  WATER DELIVERY We plan to install below ground irrigation systems in appropriate areas of the parkland to save water and improve plant health. Below ground irrigation systems are designed to improve water efficiency and plant health in certain types of areas such as large green spaces and large shrub species such as lemonadeberry, laurel sumac and toyon. They are not appropriate for flower beds. Since evaporation can use up to 40% of water delivered through conventional irrigation methods, such systems offer big savings. Additional benefits derive from reducing weed growth (exotic and invasive species) by reducing the amount of water to be found in the top layer of the soil where such species absorb their water and nutrients. By using below ground irrigation, the exotic and invasive species will be robbed of their water source and be unable to survive. An advisory group of experts will be formed to help City staff select the targeted green area and to provide the information necessary to write good specifications for the system. Areas that might be amenable to below ground irrigation are ones in and around sporting areas on the East Mesa. The change would be monitored as part of a study to assess the effects of changing over to this type of irrigation system. If the expected benefits accrue, additional below ground irrigation systems will be installed where needed during 2014-2020. DEEP ROOT IRRIGATION  WATER DELIVERY The purpose of this project is to improve the irrigation of selected plants in the Park with systems designed to deliver water directly to where it is absorbed by the plants, reducing wasted water and improving plant health. Deep root irrigation systems target water delivery to the tap roots of plants. The tap root is the root that absorbs almost all the water for the plant. These systems are particularly useful for certain types of trees, e.g., palm trees, and certain types of large shrub species. We are targeting installation of a deep root irrigation system in 2013 for a group of 21
  • 23. Final 6-21-12 trees and/or shrubs that would benefit from receiving water from this type of system, for example potentially in Palm Canyon. SPOT IRRIGATION  WATER DELIVERY Spot irrigation is where shrubs and trees are irrigated with individual nozzles that provide a specific amount of water at a specific time, normally on a timer controlled system. SLOW RELEASE IRRIGATION  WATER DELIVERY Slow release irrigation from buried clay pot containers can be an efficient means of watering under certain circumstances. IMPROVED USE OF SMART CONTROLLERS PROJECT  WATER DELIVERY This project will improve the efficiency of the new intelligent irrigation system, by mining the data that the system now collects to develop a comprehensive approach to the water needs of the Park. The Friends of Balboa Park provided the resources for purchase of smart controllers, linked to a central computer, for the Park’s existing irrigation system. Almost all of them have been installed by City staff and are operational. This new system has already reduced water use, saved labor, and improved plant health through better accuracy in watering. To make even better use of this intelligent irrigation system, it is important to collect as much information as possible from sensors on-site and to develop a comprehensive data management system to properly analyze the very large amounts of data that will be obtained. We propose to do this using a specially designed data management system to be developed specifically for this project using wireless remote sensors, integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS), so that staff can easily visualize how the system is operating in real time. In addition to the actual data collection and management, a website should be developed to allow staff access to the data from remote sites in the Park. There will also be linkage to the Center for H2O Experience, to educate the public how water is being used in the Park. WATER DELIVERY TO KEY GARDENS  WATER DELIVERY We plan to renew outdated sprinkler heads with a more efficient delivery method. When many of the gardens were planted, the sprinklers were set up for a wide spray over new plants. Now that the plantings are matured, the sprinklers are not working efficiently, the plants do not get the required watering, and water is wasted. We plan to inspect irrigation systems in the gardens to determine at what state of efficiency they are functioning, determine the most practical system for each area and install the selected system. A more efficient method of water delivery allows for healthier plants and a net gain of saving water. 22
  • 24. Final 6-21-12 WATER RECLAMATION VISION PLAN  WATER DELIVERY The Water Reclamation Vision Plan is a two-step integrative process, beginning with the Water Reclamation Information Package of the Parkland, a short term, no cost, high value deliverable that will bring the known information of a living park based on natural systems and state of the art technologies together. The second step is a no cost, high value, community conversation around living infrastructure and natural systems that will inform a Water Reclamation Vision Plan. The vision plan for water use and reuse will come from several community educational charrettes on what a living park constructed wetland infrastructure could look like, and where and how it would be located based on natural systems and opportunities in the parkland. A charrette consists of one or more meetings to organize ideas from experts, users, and stakeholders, that allows the participants to collaboratively design the solution and the plan to implement it, thereby creating a sense of joint ownership. WATER COLLECTION  WATER DELIVERY We will collect air conditioning condensate and rain water for use in irrigation. The Girl Scouts of San Diego has already developed a system of condensate water collection from seven air conditioning units at their headquarters building in Balboa Park. The system comprises three twenty gallon catchment basins located under the roof drains for the flat roof portions of the building which hold the A/C units. These drains carry condensate water made during the refrigerant evaporative cycle at a rate of between 30 and 50 gallons per day, depending on air temperature and humidity. Water collected is pumped from the catchment basins at the end of each day to a holding tank, where it can be used for landscape irrigation, either in flower beds or vegetable gardens. In an average year this simple system can catch between 10,000 and 15,000 gallons of rain and condensate water. This volume reduces irrigation water consumption from the municipal system by approximately 10% on an annual basis. We will replicate this project in several areas of the Park, first on a prototype basis under controlled conditions with a final evaluation of feasibility in 2013. Based on positive results, we will expand implementation across the Park from 2014 – 2017. WATER DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES PROJECT  WATER DELIVERY We intend to replace aging infrastructure that delivers water to key areas in the Central Mesa. This will reduce wasted water from leaks, lessen the likelihood that all water will be shut off in the Central Mesa and beyond if a major leak needs repair, and save long-term maintenance costs. The parkland water delivery infrastructure consists of cast iron and steel pipes and valves, most of which are underground. This infrastructure is old and outdated. As a result, there are pipes that leak and valves that don’t work properly. Some pipe leakage is simply a result of deteriorating pipe material. Additional leakage results from poor pressure control from malfunctioning valves; these pressure problems contribute to more deterioration of the pipe material. Some of the leaks are relatively small and many of them are unknown, so we can’t tell how much seepage is occurring in the Park. Some leaks are large and noticeable, warranting repair. Leak repairs require significant expense and time in labor and materials; they also have collateral impacts on other natural resources. Some leaks are so large that they require shutting off the entire water supply to a major section of the Park—creating significant disruption for visitors and employees in the Park. The leaks are currently repaired by installing galvanized patches. While this is the quickest and cheapest short-term approach, it is more expensive over the long-term. These patches create deterioration downstream in the pipe, causing more problems, so it is an ongoing situation that can only be remedied by use of contemporary materials and sensors. As the 2015 Centennial approaches, it is critical that certain 23
  • 25. Final 6-21-12 Central Mesa areas have reliable, state-of-the art infrastructure to supply water. Since selected Central Mesa areas may undergo other construction, this represents a particularly good opportunity to upgrade pipes and valves. We will determine whether the pipe needs to be upgraded, the valves need to be upgraded, or both. If it includes the pipe, we will decide whether it is more cost-effective to replace the cast iron pipe with PVC pipe, or to line the inside of the cast iron pipe with a PVC coating. The latter is a less expensive and invasive means of reducing pipe deterioration because no excavation is required. The coating is simply injected into the pipe. At the same time we will determine which state-of-the-art sensors for detecting leakage on an ongoing basis can be selected for installation: ones which detect pressure drops, or sensors which detect failed valves. We will install the new pipe material, valves and sensors simultaneously. Based on the success and lessons learned from this project, as part of the smartscaping strategy we plan to restore or replace the remaining out-of-date water delivery infrastructure as needed in the rest of the Park during 2016 – 2020. BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION The purpose is to develop a Center for “H2O Experience” at Balboa Park. The goal of the center will be to enhance the water-based experiences of visitors (local, national, and international), students, and staff through formalized educational and experiential programs that emphasize the significance of water sustainability. This center will have numerous benefits. How Balboa Park approaches water sustainability issues will impact the environmental quality of both the immediate region and more far-reaching places by teaching people how to implement water-wise practices in their own homes and communities. Subjects will include Irrigation methods, water quality management systems, water conservation activities, waste reduction practices, energy efficiency measures associated with water reduction, in-house environmental education and community environmental outreach programs, and ecological protection projects will be implemented through ecotourism projects. As the projects in this roadmap proceed, Balboa Park can evolve into an internationally renowned Water-wise benchmark. Through educational and experiential programs and activities, the Center intends to – 1. Engage tourists and local community members in voluntourism activities relating to the significance of water conservation: e.g., urban horticulture, farming, aquaponics, environmental design/architecture, and arts 2. Involve the Balboa Park “community,” including tourists, entrepreneurs and community residents in “giving back” campaigns and fund-raising initiatives focusing on water-sustainability 3. Offer certificate programs, internships and/or CEUs for tourists and community participants, including university students and working professionals, who can demonstrate the ability to make contributions towards water conservation and waste reduction 4. Provide opportunities for collaborative research projects and scholastic activities that complement the objectives of the Center 5. Evaluate, both quantitatively and qualitatively, whether or not ecotourism projects meet the goals and objective of the water-wise initiative In order to ensure environmental sustainability, it is necessary to integrate the principles of sustainable development into Balboa Park’s water-wise policies and programs. A major requirement for the achievement of water-wise focused environmental sustainability in Balboa Park is a demonstrated evidence of activities and policies aimed at water sustainability and the resultant reversal of loss of environmental resources as well as the provision of equal sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Existing research on ecotourism indicates that a tourism institution’s 24
  • 26. Final 6-21-12 commitment towards improving sustainability can be established through ecotourism projects that emphasize existing efforts relating to water consumption and sanitation, waste management, energy efficiency and power consumption, environmental education, and wildlife conservation. The Center will focus on: 1. Establishing long-term collaborative programs with tourism organizations, community entities, and educational institutions, in the area of water-conservation and eco-efficiency 2. Developing ecotourism linkages, based on water-conversation and sustainability, between Balboa Park, tourism and hospitality organizations, and local educational institutions of higher learning 3. Supporting the enhancement of the Park’s commitment to water conservation and sustainable human development through innovative initiatives that promote economic development and engagement in civil society 4. Developing water-wise cooperative programs that prioritize the representation of biodiversity and culture, and provide service to local communities. The concept of a center related to sustainability is not a new idea; in fact, such centers have currently been established in several countries and their respective ecological attractions. The proposal to establish a Center for “H2O Experience” is certainly unique considering the water-sustainability issues plaguing the planet. Considering San Diego’s border bio-region, critical issues concerning water sustainability, as it relates to environmental, social, and governance issues have the potential to negatively impact the future of tourism in the region. Affiliation with the Center will be of significant interest to major tourism players in the region (including major tourism attractions and marketing agencies), particularly since much of the tourism inflow and resultant economic activity in San Diego is based on visitors’ interest and participation in water-/marine-based activities. Partnerships with local tourism entities, community organizations and educational institutions will be instrumental in the accomplishment of the Center’s goals. Phase 1 (2012-2013) A physical and/or virtual Center for H2O Experience at Balboa Park will be established for fostering both passive and active eco-tourism, educational and experiential programs and activities, in addition to serving as a repository of water-wise knowledge, which can be shared with Balboa Park staff, visitors, and community members. During Phase 1 (2012-2013), the Center will attempt to accomplish the following initiatives: 1). Implement voluntourism programs to engage tourists and local community members, 2). Create volunteer events for special groups (e.g., military, veterans, spouses), families, organizations, 3). Reinforce linkages with Universities, schools, institutions of higher learning, and youth organizations by providing internships/field study programs, 4). Collaborate with universities to create waterwise Certificate Programs, Training Programs and Credit Extension Unit (CEU) courses for Balboa Park staff, 5). Initiate Water-Wise Lecture Series, 6). Offer Green Movie Nights to showcase sustainability-themed movies, 7). Build the IT infrastructure necessary to house the Center for H2O Experience, 8). Design visitor and community education programs and identify best practices associated with drinking water in Balboa Park, 9). Start a Water-Wise Scavenger Hunt for young people, 10). Capture the history of Marston family’s use of their house and property in wise use of water and use it as a basis of an educational program, 11). Study the possibility of the Marston House and adjacent property as an exhibit and staging Center for H2O Experience at Balboa Park, 12). Facilitate the overlay of maps/grids with attractions/trails, and, 13). Implement a mechanism to evaluate, both quantitatively and qualitatively, whether or not ecotourism projects meet the goals and objectives of the water-wise initiative. 25
  • 27. Final 6-21-12 DRINKING WATER IN BALBOA PARK  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION The purpose is to significantly improve the sustainability of the way in which our visitors access drinking water in Balboa Park. Currently drinking water is not always consumed by Park visitors and staff in a sustainable way, e.g., use of disposable plastic bottles. To reach the objective that sustainable drinking water will be the norm in the Park by 2020, two major measures will take place: 1. A shared non-binding agreement among major entities in the Park to adopt practices for their employees and vendors that encourages them to use more sustainable drinking water methods. 2. Introduction, starting in 2012, by a few Park entities, of means to supply high quality drinking water to their staffs and visitors. Best practices from other parks will also be gathered and considered for adoption. These measures will reduce the cost of drinkable water for visitors and staff, reduce the amounts of pollutants such as CO2 into our environment by the production, transportation and disposal of plastic bottles, and reduce trash in Balboa Park. An added benefit is that this education will improve the way visitors access drinking water in their communities and homes. WATER-WISE SCAVENGER HUNT (ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION The Phase 1 Scavenger Hunt will be directed to elementary school age children. It will be modeled on the Balboa Park Scavenger Hunt already available through the Park Visitors’ Center. This Scavenger Hunt was developed by FOBP and the Balboa Park Educators’ Council (BPEC). Children receive a printed brochure directing them to specific locations. A question is then posed. The answer to the question is obtainable at the specific location. Completed questionnaires are then turned in to the Visitors’ Center. Successful completion is rewarded with a Jr. Friends of Balboa Park patch. The Water-Wise Scavenger Hunt will be modeled along similar lines. Working with BPEC and others, water-wise questions will be developed and the participants directed to specific locations within the Park where the answers can be found. Perhaps there will be “hands-on” types of experiences and/or experiments. We want to make this activity fun, as well as educational. We want children to be excited about water conservation and understand why it is important. An additional benefit of the Scavenger Hunt will be “stealth” education of parents at the same time as the children. This activity will increase awareness and knowledge of water-wise issues for the whole family. Currently, the Scavenger Hunt is a paper document. We will explore the possibility of delivering the water-wise Scavenger Hunt in a “greener” way. Perhaps a smart phone “app,” or some other method. We will also explore prizes, other than patches, and other ways to reward our “hunters” for participation in the program. GREEN MOVIE NIGHTS  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION To further develop eco-tourism as part of the H2O Experience Center, we propose a series of outdoor movie screenings in one of the many open areas of the Park. The goal is to create events that promote sustainability for both San Diego residents and visitors. An organization, e.g., Earth Cinema, will show movies focused on environmental, social and economic issues while relating in subject to the 26
  • 28. Final 6-21-12 other events promoted by The Center for H2O Experience. A speaker, with expertise in the discipline related to the movie subject, would introduce the movie to the audience. The Event could be ticketed or free, depending on the scale and experience we would like to achieve. The event could be hosted by the Spreckels Organ Pavilion, which already provides seating and a stage, or be located in one of the open areas with BYO blanket seating. Local food trucks or restaurants could have their presence at the event. A separate beer garden area with local brews and local wines could contribute in creating a relaxed atmosphere and provide additional financial resources. LECTURE SERIES  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION Under the umbrella of the educational programs offered by the Balboa Park Center for H2O Experience, the Lecture Series is a proposal for a series of monthly lectures leading up to the Signature Water-Wise Educational Events during the 2015 Centennial. The goal is to build up the brand and educate our audience in anticipation of the 2015 Centennial events. Subjects of lectures would start at an entry level and gradually progress towards more advanced discussions about sustainability. Targeted audiences would include both private residents and businesses sector. Events would take place once a month, last about 90 minutes and be followed by a short networking event. Materials used during the presentations would be available online through Center for H2O Experience to support and enhance our external communication process and visibility. From the marketing standpoint this series would offer a regular opportunity to promote 2015 Centennial and related initiatives. WATER-WISE PROGRAMS (SUB-PROJECT OF BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION BALBOA PARK WATER MASCOT  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION To attract the interest of children to water-wise concepts and the importance of the issues involved, we propose the development of a water-wise mascot for Balboa Park. This would be along the lines of "Smokey the Bear," and the owl that says: "Give a hoot - don't pollute." We propose developing a mascot and a signature slogan that speaks to awareness of the importance of being water-wise. A contest could be held for school children to come up with the mascot and the slogan. This could be on an individual basis, or by classroom or school. A competition could also be held for adult artists to design posters, banners, etc. A mascot could be used to sell various merchandise, such as stuffed toys, hats, reusable tote bags, and reusable water bottles. BRAND FOR WATER-WISE (SUB-PROJECT OF BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION MARSTON HOUSE 2015 EXHIBIT  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION The Marston House, at the edge of Balboa Park, at 3525 Seventh Avenue, was built for George and Anna Marston in 1905. The architects were William Sterling Hebbard & Irving J. Gill. George Marston is well-known for being a civic leader of great vision. He was concerned with many things, including historic preservation, urban planning and conservation. Mr. Marston engaged George Cook to be the landscape architect of his new home. Mr. Cook, in 27
  • 29. Final 6-21-12 consultation with the Marstons, took an English garden concept and adapted it to the San Diego climate and growing conditions. The garden evolved over the years. The Marstons engaged a number of prominent landscape designers to work on the grounds from time to time. The Marston family also used sustainable practices for their personal water use. In the 1990's the Marston House was given to the City of San Diego by the Marston family to be maintained and opened to the public. It is an excellent example of visionaries in San Diego who were 100 years ahead of their time. The property is now managed and operated as a museum by Save Our Heritage Organization. It is open to the public at designated times. The grounds may also be rented out for private functions. We propose an exhibit near or at the house for 2015 to showcase the history of water sustainability and other sound forward-looking "green" practices at the Marston House for over 100 years. Docent tours are already offered at the home and gardens. We propose either adding a water-wise component to the tours, or adding tours especially geared to water-wise and other conservation subjects. The Marston House will be 110 years old in 2015. Highlighting the forward-thinking design of this property will be an excellent way to celebrate the 2015 Centennial and the 110th anniversary of the building of the home. This project can be coordinated with the project to smartscape Marston Addition which is open property behind the Marston House. PUBLIC DATABASE (SUB-PROJECT OF BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION SOCIAL NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES (SUB-PROJECT OF BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION NEEDS ASSESSMENT (SUB-PROJECT OF BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS (SEE ONGOING PROGRAM OVERSIGHT)  PROGRAM MANAGEMENT ONGOING PROGRAM OVERSIGHT  PROGRAM MANAGEMENT The implementation of the roadmap will require management oversight to keep it integrated, to assess progress, and to continuously revise it. It is recognized that the roadmap must be adjusted as conditions and requirements in the Park change and also as technology develops. This effort will provide that overall program management. It will also provide the point of contact, on behalf of the Friends of Balboa Park, with the City staff, including the Park and Recreation Department. SMARTSCAPE (CONTINUED)  SMARTSCAPE 28
  • 30. Final 6-21-12 MARSTON ADDITION SMARTSCAPE  SMARTSCAPE We propose to restore an area of the Park to a composition of native species which can be sustained by natural water supply. A landscape is defined by the fauna and flora that exist within natural geographic features. Most areas of the Park’s native landscape have been actively modified in various ways over many years to accommodate human usage and human interests. Some areas have also been passively modified, e.g., through unintentional introduction of non-native and/or invasive species. Several areas of the Park are designated to be native. Marston Addition/Canyon is an area that has been both actively and passively modified. It is also little visited, yet it is adjacent to a visitor attraction—the Marston House. Marston Addition/Canyon will become a “smartscape”, meaning a natural, environmentally sustainable area of the Park that reflects the native ecology of its location. One necessary but not sufficient element is that the water supply will be sustainable based on natural water patterns. It will be a showcase for the native fauna as well as the flora of the location. If Marston Addition is not a viable area, then another area will be selected. Transitioning the area to becoming a smartscape will be in three phases. The short-term (2012-2013) involves (1) researching what was there before human modifications: (2) documenting what is now there (e.g., infrastructure, soil, water patterns, flora, and fauna); and (3) deciding what changes can be made to restore it as a native eco-system. The mid-term (2014-2015) involves making the first set of these changes (e.g., removing non-native/invasive species, building shelters and introducing plants that will encourage native wildlife to repopulate the area). While some of these changes will be made by those directly committed to the project, community groups and visitors will also be engaged in “voluntourism” activities to help make these changes. 6TH AVENUE SLOPE GARDEN  SMARTSCAPE We will create the most realistic planting system for a steep slope area of Balboa Park while incorporating water sustainable practices. The canyons and slopes of Balboa Park have not always been a focus of a planting plan. As a result, many plant species are present that are not the best choice. We plan to research and install the most appropriate irrigation system and plants for steep slopes and make interpretive signage for visitors. The Slope Garden will be a selfsustainable landscape that controls erosion and educates visitors. VOLUNTEER GARDEN  SMARTSCAPE Some potential already exists for one or more buildings in the Park constructed for purpose of demonstrating and teaching sustainable living practices. The purpose of this project is to create a water-wise garden in conjunction with one or more of these living house/building demonstrations. This project also relates to the Center for H2O Experience because the garden would offer both passive and active opportunities for staff, visitors, and students. Not only could people learn water-wise gardening practices, but some of them could also become active participants in maintaining and improving the garden from an irrigation perspective. 29
  • 31. Final 6-21-12 OAK GROVE  SMARTSCAPE Create an oak grove in the area between the Trees for Health Garden and the Campfire campus. This area is currently a meadow that has a problem with soil retention. Planting a grove of oak trees will add a visually pleasant landscape, the roots will help with soil retention, and it will be a beneficial addition to the eco-system. The plan is to plant several trees every year over a number of years so they are not all the same age; as a result, they reach maturity at different times. The benefits would be an attractive self-sustainable landscape and stable soil. Many plants are available in the Kate Sessions Nursery. GOLDEN HILL FOUNTAIN GROTTO  SMARTSCAPE Our purpose is to restore the 102-year-old Golden Hill Fountain Grotto. In 1907 architect Henry Lord Gray designed an inglenook with benches, walls, radiating trails, rock double stairways and a fountain in a rustic Arts & Crafts style. Once complete, the Golden Hill Fountain Grotto will become a neighborhood treasure once again. It will draw more visitors to this generally under-visited area of the Park. It will encourage residents and visitors to adopt sustainable practices to appreciate and take pride in their own neighborhoods. It will reduce the problems associated with vagrants in this and adjacent areas because this population shuns places with frequent visitors and community oversight. Restoring the Grotto will be a complex task. It will begin with research of what was in the Grotto originally and what is now in the canyon. Next, we will create a plan for repairs and restoration, based on a smartscaping strategy for the area. We will carry out those tasks with specialists, staff and volunteers. Expertise and other assistance will come from regional universities, partner institutions in the Park, advocacy organizations, community groups, and visitors. BIRD PARK  SMARTSCAPE Our goal is to complete the playful artistic outdoor experience begun several years ago at Bird Park. This playground was developed as a site where generations of families can enjoy nature and games built into the structure of the Park. Since it is only a matter of finishing the existing design and incorporating water sustainable varieties of plants, progress could be rapid. The surrounding neighborhood would benefit with the visually interesting design. It will encourage residents to adopt practices to appreciate and take pride in their own neighborhoods. This will draw 2015 visitors and beyond to an area outside the Central Mesa, reducing congestion; it will also draw visitors to the North Park neighborhood businesses. THE ‘ROOT BALL’  SMARTSCAPE The “Root Ball” will be a major black-tie/blue jean event, to raise funds for water-wise new plants and plantings in the Park. The event will start in the early evening, and be held outside. There will be food, drink, music and activities consistent with the theme. Suggested attire would be a combination of black tie and blue jeans. Since 2000, Friends of Balboa Park has held an annual luncheon as a major fund-raiser. It is time to “kick this up a notch,” and graduate to an evening gala fund-raiser for which premium ticket prices can be commanded. A gala committee will be established which will guide how the event will unfold. Co-chairs, committee members, sponsors, etc. will be put in place. The Friends has 30
  • 32. Final 6-21-12 more than a decade of experience putting on events. The gala will bring in substantial funds that will go toward the water-wise re-planting of the Park in the coming years. The publicity and the prestige of the event will enhance the efforts and reputation of the Friends and highlight their contributions to the Park. We plan to develop significant corporate and individual sponsorships, as well as other types of contributions and donations to make this event a huge success. USE OF FERTIGATION  SMARTSCAPE The purpose of this project is to systematically investigate the feasibility of using fertigation methods in selected areas of the Park. Fertigation involves the delivery of fertilizer through irrigation systems. Benefits of fertigation over traditional fertilization methods can include: increased nutrient absorption; reduced need for fertilizer and water; reduced leaching to the water table; and increased plant health. The first project we propose on fertigation will be a scientific study to assess its feasibility for use in one selected area of the Park. If those results are successful, it will be considered for application in other areas of the Park as part of smartscaping. MAPPING AND AUDITING (CONTINUED)  DOCUMENTATION IRRIGATION ALTERNATIVES (CONTINUED)  WATER DELIVERY WATER COLLECTION (CONTINUED)  WATER DELIVERY PARK INFRASTRUCTURE WATER-WISE PILOT PROGRAM  WATER DELIVERY The Park Infrastructure Water Wise Pilot Program builds on the Water Reclamation Vision Plan and provides for a real demonstration project for a sustainable parkland infrastructure. The pilot program may involve constructed wetlands as water treatment gardens, strategically located to collect, clean, store and reuse water and demonstrate the beauty in living systems. This would be a mid-term education project designed around the centennial celebration in the Park. Opening the conversation is a no cost, no risk, and high value effort. Collaboration among the Friends of Balboa Park, Balboa Park Cultural Partnership, and the Committee of One Hundred will bring comprehensive water stewardship and demonstration for living buildings and infrastructure for 2015 eco-tourism opportunities and long term sustainability. WATER DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES (CONTINUED)  WATER DELIVERY 31
  • 33. Final 6-21-12 CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE” PHASE 2  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION During Phase 2 (2014-2015), the Center will continue to implement the activities identified in Phase 1. The priority of the Center during Phase 2 will be to accomplish the following initiatives: 1). Based on assessment of implemented programs, provide “evidence” of water-wise progress in Balboa Park and build-upon successful initiatives, 2). Involve the Balboa Park ‘community,’ including tourists, entrepreneurs and community residents in “giving back” campaigns and fund-raising initiatives, 3). Continue University linkages in the area of fieldwork/internships, Professional Development Degree/Certificate/Training programs, 4). Establish linkages with San Diego’s Hospitality and Tourism industry, 5). Implement the Water-Wise 2015 Ecotour, 6). Install signage for self-guided tours, 7). Identify tour-based revenue streams, 8). Offer Water-Wise Scavenger Hunt; design and implement additional versions, 9). Plan and arrange the 2015 Signature Educational Event Series, 10). Plan and design the Marston Addition (canyon) Smartscape for both active and passive ecotourism, educational and experiential activities, 11). Develop a physical location for the Center for H2O Experience in the Marston House location, in addition to maintaining it as a virtual center, 12). Implement the Living House Exhibit concept (see reference to this in the Water Reclamation project), and, 13). Evaluate, both quantitatively and qualitatively, whether or not ecotourism projects meet the goals and objectives of the water-wise initiative. SCAVENGER HUNT (TEENS)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION For Phase 2, we anticipate building on the success of the Scavenger Hunt developed in Phase 1 for younger children by developing an additional Scavenger Hunt for teenagers. We would likely enlist the help of high school and college students to help with this project. Tapping into the creativity of our young people will be an added benefit of this program. We could challenge them to come up with innovative and fun ways to deliver the Scavenger Hunt that would appeal to young people and engage their interest. This could be a model for a learning tool for other subject areas within the Park, and elsewhere, as well. The intent is to develop something that is truly innovative. 2015 EDUCATIONAL EVENT SERIES  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION Under the Center for H2O Experience, the 2015 Educational Event Series offers full day educational events hosted by world-recognized experts and celebrities, sharing applicable, state-of-the-art water sustainability knowledge with both visitors and local residents. This will be a series of approximately four 1-day events to be interspersed throughout the year. Events can consist of one major speaker and some smaller group workshops, all world-class in terms of speakers and content. They should achieve the “Wow” factor. Half of the speakers will be world-renowned technical experts on the subject, while the other half will be major celebrities with a track record of achievements on this topic. The project will attract not only more tourists to San Diego, but it will attract a special class of national and international visitors, generating more revenue and awareness for the City. By virtue of having these experts in our midst, we can also take the opportunity to tap their expertise about our future challenges to becoming water-wise by 2020. It will also generate enthusiasm for the vision, which in turn can generate more resources needed to reach the vision. 32
  • 34. Final 6-21-12 WATER-WISE 2015 TOUR  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION This will be a tour offered to Park visitors during the 2015 Centennial that will show (1) all the water-wise accomplishments in the Park to date, and (2) address the remaining challenges to make the Park water-wise by 2020. It has two purposes: (1) Educate visitors in how they can apply some of these water-saving techniques in their own communities and homes; and (2) Gain community support for addressing the remaining water-wise challenges in the Park. This structured tour could cover both parkland and buildings. It will be offered on a periodic basis throughout 2015. The parkland tour can be in both guided form and self-guided form. The latter would require signage and/or use of Quick Response (QR) code applications. This tour will be designed and supported in partnership with the Center for H2O Experience and one or more of the cultural institutions in the Park or elsewhere in San Diego whose missions relate to water as a resource. It will build on smaller scale tours and educational programs developed and run during 2013-2014. A specific tour could be to the smartscape of the Marston Addition. Benefits include: (1) Attracting out-of-town tourists who are interested in environmental sustainability issues; (2) Educating both tourists and locals in how to save water in their homes and communities; (3) Generating support (funding, volunteer labor, etc.) to finish the work of making the parkland water-wise by 2020. MARSTON ADDITION SMARTSCAPE TOURS (SUB-PROJECT OF BALBOA PARK CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE”)  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS (CONTINUED)  PROGRAM MANAGEMENT ONGOING PROGRAM OVERSIGHT (CONTINUED)  PROGRAM MANAGEMENT SMARTSCAPE (CONTINUED)  SMARTSCAPE NON-INTRUSIVE WATER MEASURING DEVICES  DOCUMENTATION Currently there are only a handful of water meters in Balboa Park, so it is not possible to measure the use of water in many areas of the parkland. Consequently it is not straightforward to be able to measure the before and after changes in water savings from implementing water saving methods and technologies. One method is to use hard water audits, and this method will be employed in one or more short-term projects in this Roadmap. Other methods are available however, and more are being developed. One of these additional methods is a flow meter. This device can be temporarily installed to assess the amount of water being used. While they are expensive, they can be moved from place to place to do assessments in different areas where changes in irrigation systems are being made or water delivery infrastructure is being upgraded to reduce leakage. Even newer methods are in research and development. They rely on the demand signal from the flow. 33
  • 35. Final 6-21-12 MAPPING AND AUDITING (CONTINUED)  DOCUMENTATION IRRIGATION ALTERNATIVES (CONTINUED)  WATER DELIVERY WATER COLLECTION (CONTINUED)  WATER DELIVERY FINAL IMPLEMENTATION OF PARK WATER TREATMENT INFRASTRUCTURE: MAXIMIZE RECLAMATION OF ALL TYPES OF WATER (SUB-PROJECT OF PARK INFRASTRUCTURE WATER-WISE PILOT PROGRAM)  WATER DELIVERY WATER DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES (CONTINUED)  WATER DELIVERY CENTER FOR “H2O EXPERIENCE” PHASE 3  ECO-TOURISM AND ECO-EDUCATION During Phase 3 (2016-2020), the Center will continue to implement the activities identified in Phase 2. The priority of the Center during Phase 3 will be to accomplish the following initiatives: 1). Provide opportunities for collaborative research projects and scholastic activities with Universities, schools, and other institutions, that complement the objectives of the Center, 2). Prepare final assessment report and examine program assessment results – continue, modify, and re-introduce “successful” Phase 1 and Phase 2 programs, 3). Implement fund-raising campaigns in collaboration with San Diego’s Hospitality and Tourism industry, including tourism marketing and development agencies and partners who are relevant to Balboa Park’s Center for H2O Experience initiative, and, 4). Evaluate, both quantitatively and qualitatively, whether or not ecotourism projects meet the goals and objectives of Balboa Park’s water-wise initiative. ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS (CONTINUED)  PROGRAM MANAGEMENT ONGOING PROGRAM OVERSIGHT (CONTINUED)  PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 34
  • 36. Final 6-21-12 MAP APPENDIX The following three pages are different maps of Balboa Park. The maps respectively are: 1. A topographical map of Balboa Park 2. A watershed map of Balboa Park 3. An aerial map of Balboa Park These maps have a high level of detail and the digital version gives the ability to zoom in and magnify the details on these maps. Please download the PDF version of this report from the Friends of Balboa Park’s public water-wise page http://waterwise.friendsofbalboapark.org. 35
  • 37. RAY 344 342 340 338 338 30TH 31ST 336 338 334 330 330 326 328 320 300 320 310 300 300 310 270 290 280 250 230 228 23 2 22 4 26 2 2 22 42 6 240 2 38 300 22 0 272 274 258 256 270 246 230 300 300 260 300 CAPITAN 300 300 DULZURA 290 270 290 8 298 286 290 30TH 28 0 288 250 280 260 298 292 270 26 0 23 0 190 204 2 02 244 240 242 246 240 31ST 240 244 240 240 240 230 224 22 2 210 220 230 24 0 240 GROVE 234 230 230 230 232 29TH 200 230 22 0 210 210 ALLEY 23 0 202 204 230 230 232 230 230 230 222 222 230 240 210 214 200 190 180 218 226 226 228 232 260 226 270 232 GROVE 254 240 240 250 228 23 0 238 228 226 224 194 270 250 260 PRIVATE FERN 27 0 250 220 220 270 FERN 270 276 260 250 250 232 DALE 222 GRANADA 220 202 230 200 200 196 210 200 ALLEY 180 180 19 0 182 190 196 204 176 206 194 186 212 21 0 2 200 08 22 0 218 22 0 30TH 202 186 214 224 210 212 200 18 0 184 17 0 190 180 29TH 190 204 206 200 17 8 250 300 30TH 272 264 268 290 296 29 290 288 268 260 240 234 222 230 210 200 176 178 184 31ST 30 8 310 320 270 250 240 236 230 270 270 252 294 300 300 294 260 260 240 230 200 194 200 190 180 172 194 200 SAN MARCOS 290 272 272 250 240 250 240 250 242 230 21 0 190 200 200 220 220 210 18 0 196 206 186 190 200 21 2 300 ALLEY 320 318 306 29 0 300 29 0 230 252 22 0 250 190 200 210 220 220 210 200 198 192 188 214 320 310 DALE 320 320 314 31 0 280 266 26 2 220 210 23 0 226 188 194 212 206 210 210 204 ALLEY 332 ALLEY 324 32 0 29TH 280 240 250 22 0 27 0 240 250 224 190 210 200 23 25 0 0 220 24 0 210 19 0 170 190 200 180 230 230 196 200 192 218 27TH 202 200 196 190 180 ALLEY 316 300 18 0 20 190 0 180 180 172 18 0 17 0 22 0 200 226 21 0 210 210 218 210 19 8 182 190 188 178 330 320 300 290 284 190 200 190 200 19 0 200 20 0 210 228 220 22 0 22 0 216 214 212 200 192 29TH 33 0 320 ALLEY 260 260 230 240 220 22 0 210 210 190 16 0 20 0 15 0 190 228 230 214 202 200 208 330 330 300 GRANADA 280 25 24 0 0 220 19 2 0 0 0 25 0 21 0 194 180 190 17 0 17 0 23 4 236 236 23 4 232 230 220 GOLF COURSE ALLEY 330 328 326 320 322 28TH 290 27 0 260 270 230 230 24 8 25 6 230 220 20 0 15 0 15 6 160 ALLEY 330 296 268 25 6 250 240 236 236 22 6 230 19 0 21 0 194 200 194 GRIM 334 338 338 ALLEY 29TH 338 340 340 340 GRANADA UTAH ALLEY ALLEY 340 340 342 340 340 324 31 6 320 330 306 310 308 310 VILLA 310 24 0 250 230 210 180 2 20 10 0 18 190 0 17 0 21 0 23 0 21 0 20 0 22 0 21 0 200 26TH 210 200 200 20 0 198 200 216 218 ALLEY 212 212 210 220 218 210 25TH 210 200 196 170 260 25 2 250 220 210 22 0 190 180 20 0 19 0 19 0 19 0 20 0 190 210 180 180 24TH 180 170 300 ALLEY 26 6 260 260 230 24 22 0 0 228 226 240 24 0 246 21 0 200 220 210 200 23 0 20 0 220 13 0 19 0 18 0 210 216 12 0 150 19 0 170 178 17 0 23RD 170 170 260 258 260 250 250 248 250 242 230 240 23 0 190 220 210 14 0 13 0 12 2 12 0 150 14 1 0 50 13 0 17 0 12 0 110 11 0 12 13 0 0 150 170 160 200 19 0 110 10 0 150 18 0 190 200 15 0 110 10 0 16 0 140 13 9 0 6 130 10 0 160 150 150 248 260 260 260 260 25 0 26 0 250 250 25 0 240 240 242 20 0 180 0 15 170 0 16 0 12 2 230 2 30 230 200 190 20 8 20 16 0 12 13 1 0 0 40 13 0 100 10 0 96 110 10 0 NT RO CE M TO 22ND 25 0 260 262 260 270 260 256 250 244 246 256 20 0 190 200 260 260 250 252 270 262 26 25 0 0 27 0 274 27 0 268 0 270 270 2 7 272 270 26 0 24 4 22 0 222 220 220 190 170 160 150 150 94 100 90 90 100 G 90 80 80 CA 90 ALLEY 140 130 ARNOLD 270 28 28 2 0 278 276 270 27 0 260 25 0 25 0 240 250 230 226 228 180 140 130 120 130 120 100 100 130 12 0 11 0 IN SH 80 90 90 82 80 R PE 90 86 90 100 13 0 90 21ST 120 110 260 270 276 28 0 28 0 270 24 0 26 0 25 0 26 2 25 26 6 2 26 0 26 0 24 2 6 50 234 200 116 130 110 104 110 200 140 120 120 140 120 150 15 0 14 0 286 280 25 0 27 0 24 0 260 240 23 0 244 240 25 25 0 6 2 60 26 0 250 25 4 248 132 170 170 160 160 170 170 180 16 0 130 120 106 130 140 140 150 180 200 170 180 170 150 1 50 190 160 180 200 N 17 0 160 276 27 2 262 25 0 25 0 21 0 200 200 220 230 200 122 200 208 208 190 210 204 210 WIL SO 16 0 15 0 12 0 13 0 11 0 92 78 80 80 8 0 110 120 90 88 80 80 120 120 110 120 120 126 110 100 80 20TH 90 320 PARK VILLA 280 290 ALLEY 290 ARIZONA 298 270 280 268 276 26 0 270 264 250 24 0 230 210 24 0 140 138 136 132 22 22 4 2 230 14 0 140 240 246 150 200 210 214 220 220 210 210 BOB 140 16 0 14 0 17 0 15 0 74 72 72 80 330 296 TEXAS 288 290 288 LOUISIANA 290 282 280 280 MISSISSIPPI 250 278 270 230 200 190 230 180 190 190 150 150 160 160 170 180 170 190 22 2 17 0 190 170 180 76 80 84 80 80 70 70 70 280 ALLEY 260 270 250 ALABAMA 270 266 200 21 0 180 158 160 160 170 180 200 200 200 19 0 178 182 17 0 200 190 200 180 20 0 208 208 20 0 204 80 80 90 90 10 0 80 80 68 70 286 250 24 0 260 260 200 190 180 170 170 164 170 190 180 180 190 230 176 200 21 0 186 190 20 0 90 70 250 220 190 170 174 170 200 210 200 200 220 22 0 20 8 216 212 22 0 200 210 H WE LC 17 0 90 90 I-5 NB OFF 19TH 86 80 70 88 240 21 0 192 188 180 190 210 180 200 190 220 21 0 220 230 260 24 0 230 240 240 210 210 218 204 220 210 220 220 200 216 210 224 220 220 230 240 19 0 100 90 250 240 210 194 200 19 0 240 230 220 250 230 240 250 254 250 240 240 270 280 27 0 250 21 8 22 0 214 224 220 210 212 204 220 226 230 PRIVATE 250 242 11 0 11 0 10 6 90 230 220 ALLEY 210 202 200 20 2 19 4 210 196 230 21 0 200 240 240 230 270 270 284 240 230 250 260 272 262 280 284 210 230 240 220 230 240 250 250 240 220 260 28 0 270 280 280 270 270 270 280 286 288 288 288 282 28 0 250 282 286 230 240 220 230 250 WILSHIRE 260 270 290 24 0 28 6 26 27 28 0 0 0 25 0 290 290 290 290 282 290 26 0 23 2 0 50 220 24 2 0 6 0 2 210 230 70 220 240 250 258 250 210 208 220 2 240 10 230 240 2 248 30 238 WEBER 240 252 250 90 90 90 80 60 64 270 290 290 280 288 300 GEORGIA 280 290 298 280 260 260 250 250 250 250 PRIVATE 200 80 80 17TH 70 70 80 80 23 0 294 300 INDIANA 298 290 292 298 298 296 294 296 270 O 250 OR DE 250 PRESIDENTS 17TH 90 96 80 16TH 90 80 100 80 90 90 15TH 90 74 80 256 VILLAGE 270 272 270 PA S 24 0 23 0 226 160 140 150 130 130 100 100 76 290 300 300 300 290 200 200 200 20 6 238 23 0 140 140 138 132 150 14 0 148 120 14TH 30 4 300 302 302 300 280 278 278 270 198 192 18 2 188 180 200 19 0 230 17 4 21 0 22 0 21 0 16 0 1 160 60 150 150 136 140 132 162 140 146 142 150 136 304 302 30 0 306 306 282 290 25 0 270 25 8 230 22 0 21 20 0 2 19 4 230 208 2 180 184 00 190 178 190 204 21 0 220 200 18 6 18 8 180 180 146 140 150 144 26 0 262 24 0 240 230 200 186 190 210 214 180 16 184 2 182 0 1 66 17 1 6 7 18 0 160 90 13TH 302 300 308 300 304 ALLEY 304 302 300 270 280 270 240 PLAZA DE PANAMA 260 0 23 25 02 0 4 260 ST IC A ER AM 210 160 16 4 17 0 160 150 150 118 306 300 300 300 300 ZOO 290 29 0 27 0 23 0 25 2 0 4 0 26 28 0 24 0 27 4 0 26 0 260 27 0 270 270 250 26 0 N EA 250 PA N N 17 8 16 0 148 90 EO 27 0 260 250 21 0 23 0 IC A 18 0 16 0 150 160 15 8 150 158 14 0 140 90 24 0 300 300 300 290 294 294 290 28 0 24 0 24 8 25 0 250 25 0 236 200 190 28 0 290 270 260 280 260 248 250 270 28 0 286 25 0 240 25 8 260 25 0 22 0 ER AM 160 86 CRESTWOOD 310 304 300 PARK 304 290 ALLEY HERBERT 292 0 28 0 27 200 22 0 18 6 210 190 20 0 172 240 266 268 210 230 190 22 6 PA N 22 0 20 0 18 4 196 21 2 14 6 120 130 110 120 120 110 100 90 10TH 78 302 300 292 27 6 25 0 250 230 210 230 220 20 0 250 220 230 21 0 20 0 21 0 26 0 28 2 230 250 276 270 270 170 180 220 20 0 190 210 200 180 130 120 120 110 110 110 80 11TH 100 82 78 200 204 188 200 6 17 198 4 21 180 8 17 200 202 Copyright SanGIS 2009 - All Rights Reserved. Full text of this legal notice can be found at: http://www.sangis.org/Legal_Notice.htm 190 216 190 THIS MAP/DATA IS PROVIDED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Note: This product may contain information from the SANDAG Regional Information System which cannot be reproduced without the written permission of SANDAG. This product may contain information reproduced with permission granted by RAND MCNALLY & COMPANY® to SanGIS. This map is copyrighted by RAND MCNALLY & COMPANY®. It is unlawful to copy or reproduce all or any part thereof, whether for personal use or resale, without the prior, written permission of RAND MCNALLY & COMPANY®. 190 180 210 200 200 188 21 0 216 210 190 16 6 194 200 196 198 204 ALLEY 182 200 202 76 For reprints, mapping or additional information please contact SanGIS. 202 200 178 72 284 260 280 290 PRIVATE 28 0 286 282 260 270 280 18 0 16 0 180 170 150 230 22 0 FF 100 100 98 100 90 28 0 260 28 0 28 4 282 280 282 280 240 260 26 0 230 27 0 27 0 23 2 25 0 270 23 0 280 27 0 24 6 24 4 23 8 21 0 220 26 0 14 17 8 0 144 146 140 160 198 100 SR-163 NB ON 98 SR-163 NB O 100 80 80 90 86 90 82 9 90 84 0 100 I-5 SB OFF 130 120 110 110 100 100 260 27 0 27 0 26 0 22 0 136 140 136 170 190 200 210 220 21 0 13 0 120 ALBERT 290 29 2 290 28 6 28 0 280 23 2 0 5 0 20 0 21 0 24 0 21 0 210 150 180 160 170 190 150 140 160 180 120 120 90 92 90 110 90 72 220 210 0 21 200 180 200 192 200 202 180 66 290 286 280 29 0 VERMONT 280 27 0 FF O 20 0 230 22 0 210 190 160 170 180 160 13 0 130 150 SR-163 N 124 120 152 130 140 140 10TH 148 130 90 10 0 11 0 94 100 09TH 120 130 08TH 140 80 80 200 170 160 190 200 15 0 14 0 SR- SR-163 163 SB 140 NB 150 B ON 144 130 140 140 130 150 140 13 0 120 130 134 14 0 130 146 150 80 90 90 80 06TH 296 288 26 0 28 0 248 21 8 270 276 NB 63 -1 170 160 170 158 160 OFF SB 163 130 140 150 160 160 160 160 142140 150 150 166 150 160 170 190 18 0 SR 180 184 180 170 200 176 170 168 SR- 160 150 156 14 2 150 1 17 92 0 190 160 164 170 168 150 144 106 118 108 07TH 120 90 70 180 170 190 210 180 180 08TH AVENUE 170 160 190 20 0 172 172 170 160 160 160 162 150 140 130 136 138 140 110 90 82 80 78 62 San Diego Geographic Information Source 5201 Ruffin Road, Suite E San Diego, CA 92123 (858) 874-7000 www.sangis.org 230 230 0 22 60 230 230 0 230 23 234 190 180 174 60 200 188 182 180 56 6 23 220 204 190 190 58 234 234 210 60 236 Map made exclusively for our client by the 0 17 2 19 4 17 170 180 54 19 0 170 190 19 0 200 22 0 222 210 20 0 212 156 130 110 100 05TH 23 0 240 230 220 220 200 210 160 150 150 122 116 96 80 80 250 18 0 180 250 220 24 0 200 254 250 25 4 246 250 242 230 200 190 150 140 110 210 24 0 250 260 230 200 200 210 210 220 230 228 200 190 118 70 22 6 220 210 200 208 186 190 42 50 ± 24 0 2 23 04TH 0 24 70 242 240 2 23 220 70 70 240 246 240 220 210 210 200 198 03RD 230 240 210 190 200 190 200 210 18 0 190 180 210 220 230 240 250 200 190 19 0 18 0 190 150 116 86 84 Vicinity Map 184 196 8 20 24 2 0 8 3 21 2 80 80 80 14 0 210 218 200 172 186 180 176 156 21 6 23 0 20 0 192 210 236 220 210 230 230 260 228 232 220 240 250 27 0 270 260 270 260 256 250 250 250 250 240 242 210 210 212 210 216 220 228 218 170 160 152 172 90 1 inch = 300 feet 88 184 1 194 80 206 190 600 Feet 200 240 240 150 300 242 0 23 204 200 198 180 212 200 206 0 24 242 0 186 18 2 214 240 238 240 222 232 0 22 70 188 180 192 220 220 240 198 184 19 6 216 14 220 210 2 220 2 22 214 216 70 2 19 20 0 234 232 4 19 212 42 0 21 200 2 23 CEDAR 0 22 0 22 48 208 4 20 23 0 224 200 234 230 220 230 240 230 226 226 46 208 230 240 2 226 22 220 0 23 240 240 226 220 20 0 246 22 8 218 0 20 0 184 210 02ND 260 220 0 21 232 240 230 2 34 210 230 240 230 220 240 250 250 240 224 0 22 0 25 264 260 224 220 210 0 21 80 190 190 240 230 250 27 0 28 0 28 0 BALBOA 280 280 250 250 220 210 148 220 214 204 210 210 21 0 200 210 200 240 20 0 260 23 240 0 280 286 280 280 27 0 240 230 224 210 190 230 26 250 0 270 286 290 290 284 284 260 270 272 260 272 262 260 250 240 250 27 0 25 0 290 290 292 290 288 286 290 250 250 22 0 27 0 220 250 280 27 4 278 270 250 240 220 20 0 190 200 210 25 0 23 200 0 26 210 4 206 190 1 1 192 80 60 20 17 0 0 240 270 21 0 230 25 0 230 268 250 272 21 0 260 254 280 280 280 290 296 294 28 0 280 2 80 270 270 270 250 248 236 01ST 228 220 280 280 280 290 290 290 274 270 260 250 256 260 258 260 250 240 244 240 240 200 230 292 292 290 02ND 29 2 264 240 240 210 230 176 198 170 230 296 296 280 256 252 252 250 23 21 0 8 218 21 2 222 23 0 230 292 PRIVATE 280 29 8 280 07TH 280 286 ALLEY 04TH ALLEY 296 296 290 03RD 29 0 ALLEY 280 292 280 01ST ALLEY 270 26 2 238 236 150 250 230 130 270 274 260 216 220 230 240 250 240 260 262 260 DATE 0 20 54 2 26 250 260 280 276 0 28 240 216 220 262 220 56 8 25 260 ALLEY 254 26 0 260 210 19 178 210 40 270 HAWTHORN 280 140 0 28 182 ALLEY 280 278 270 250 130 0 30 28 0 280 270 0 22 210 220 120 2 30 220 300 290 290 288 280 268 220 120 4 4 28 280 270 260 230 0 23 234 224 0 22 70 0 30 Y 2658 2 4 30 LE 286 290 27 0 230 0 21 204 176 8 24 260 290 AL 4 29 270 ALLEY 26 0 ELM 210 200 190 16 8 306 0 0 22 240 0 27 0 26 240 210 222 210 204 250 7 266 2 300 312 250 180 292 290 ASH 210 196 304 0 26 310 316 260 250 0 27 250 270 0 260 26 218 306 0 30 280 260 0 29 60 2 0 27 280 0 19 JUNIPER 27 0 210 220 208 218 22 0 212 B 300 8 29 320 320 320 310 320 LILAC 300 290 200 170 234 110 324 298 0 31 298 0 25 210 300 296 BEECH 208 210 214 208 30 6 240 200 202 204 330 330 FRONT 330 330 330 310 296 280 270 260 0 24 240 230 188 200 204 200 174 192 184 172 176 168 198 180 186 200 190 210 0 20 190 206 196 212 8 30 300 298 296 282 280 22 0 18 2 190 212 200 186 190 ALLEY 210 200 186 120 202 210 0 15 140 130 200 214 212 214 6 20 204 202 200 0 31 0 32 0 31 294 280 270 250 0 22 0 23 210 210 212 LE ALLEY 260 210 186 2 21 210 200 202 208 208 190 210 210 0 32 04 3 2 32 320 310 300 280 0 26 0 23 0 22 10 2 210 230 0 22 220 178 L RE 30 0 230 RUSS 214 210 P MA 230 190 200 0 6 20 210 160 208 212 6 20 210 320 310 290 280 0 22 210 220 21 200 200 0 21 220 208 ALLEY 216 218 296 8 30 300 260 GRAPE 190 190 210 318 310 0 94 30 2 290 240 224 210 ILL 222 220 218 200 192 A 298 290 200 210 200 170 0 16 140 214 2 31 300 0 28 234 232 220 0 22 180 200 0 22 0 21 26TH ST 190 H GOLDEN 222 212 210 200 170 22 0 29 8 274 228 19 0 EL 30 0 298 0 29 80 270 2 300 U 296 ALLEY 298 0 268 26 290 300 29 0 244 280 UR KALMIA 230 250 LA 294 24 2 0 23 NUTMEG AME I NG RL BU 240 30 236 2 8 24 0 23 0 26 0 25 0 230 24 LA 29 8 ALLEY 210 220 296 FIR 220 206 252 234 0 22 6 216 21 MAPLE 290 21 0 220 220 332 310 290 270 230 0 210 22 224 6 22 26 2 27 0 290 26 0 25 4 IVY 230 240 60 2 220 230 4 22 30 0 290 220 250 260 280 240 0 29 260 262 25 0 240 216 22 8 220 222 228 0 19 334 330 320 310 302 0 2 29 29 230 2 23 0 20 180 0 17 200 0 21 222 220 0 17 220 0 19 190 220 230 170 180 232 230 240 260 230 200 27 0 310 0 27 230 27 0 224 220 MAPLE 296 23 0 0 20 180 210 210 230 21 0 22 0 210 196 190 170 190 220 ALLEY 236 180 190 230 220 190 170 0 16 220 0 20 140 0 16 0 17 0 17 0 21 330 2 33 320 0 31 240 0 16 0 16 220 190 0 16 150 0 170 15 0 17 0 90 18 1 0 20 0 21 210 200 0 18 180 22 0 200 240 0 25 270 250 0 0 0 25 26 80 28 290 2 270 0 21 230 240 260 0 250 27 200 22 0 20 0 210 200 190 26 27 0 0 292 0 21 22 0 0 22 180 29 31 0 28 0 0 310 30 28 0 0 240 190 20 0 24 0 230 296 28 0 2 220 30 200 19 0 180 230 180 0 16 188 200 23 0 316 310 290 30 0 28 0 310 260 0 21 LAUREL 0 0 25 0 24 23 60 270 2 0 0 27 28 25 0 180 238 0 23 310 312 0 220 23 200 0 0 21 22 296 ALLEY 310 0 21 200 0 22 250 0 22 20 0 224 0 20 310 306 31 0 320 0 20 210 23 2 200 198 320 1999 2 Foot Topo QUINCE 0 270 28 0 50 26 2 0 22 0 20 Roads 318 316 OLIVE 230 22 0 210 186 0 17 0 0 17 16 18 6 190 0 15 0 14 130 14 0 180 220 0 13 0 18 0 16 150 0 11 200 19 0 0 19 0 20 0 23 234 170 0 20 0 22 0 22 0 18 200 0 20 220 17 0 320 320 280 210 190 0 19 0 20 0 0 21 120 108 190 00 2 320 248 190 18 108 106 140 150 0 19 120 180 0 23 160 200 0 12 0 17 110 0 19 0 22 0 21 200 0 0 20 19 210 180 170 0 14 0 18 0 16 0 20 322 0 24 210 230 210 150 0 15 0 0 17 19 0 18 0 17 0 14 0 13 140 0 0 14 13 0 16 220 120 8 20 208 190 170 120 90 160 18 0 160 280 130 130 0 13 0 15 110 96 90 15 0 0 29 0 16 0 15 0 14 130 0 12 180 160 170 160 150 150 148 170 90 1 160 180 210 0 90 00 0 15 0 1 2 17 180 19 0 20 21 2 210 140 150 0 24 0 14 210 200 180 160 0 16 220 21 0 180 190 20 0 210 0 22 0 23 0 18 170 160 130 110 92 110 90 13 0 230 200 0 17 0 18 70 1 0 19 200 190 180 170 0 16 0 14 300 268 220 21 0 0 15 40 0 70 1 16 1 0 15 0 14 0 15 0 16 0 14 160 320 0 30 200 210 200 190 188 180 120 130 0 13 0 22 200 210 0 190 180 14 160 0 170 16 0 0 15 15 140 0 180 170 17 190 160 180 160 168 170 90 190 1 200 210 210 210 220 190 130 230 150 320 30 0 290 220 0 16 4 15 PALM 240 230 200 0 17 210 180 200 180 230 0 18 0 16 200 SPRUCE 230 200 0 17 158 226 210 204 200 130 240 170 260 250 240 0 21 0 17 4 16 220 190 220 0 22 23 0 0 20 0 18 170 190 240 16 0 270 Parcels 324 330 330 320 260 20 0 252 2 50 240 210 2 24 200 184 0 24 0 23 0 21 214 210 190 180 220 24 0 170 19 0 30 0 Legend 328 REDWOOD NUTMEG 33 0 City Buildings THORN 310 254 0 24 330 318 280 248 2 25 0 24 252 240 220 210 170 130 190 140 160 140 150 160 120 150 286 270 180 120 4 130 118 124 116 11 120 130 150 24 2 15 0 2 24 17 0 190 200 21 0 23 0 0 12 250 250 170 150 130 20 120 1 248 240 0 19 0 18 304 238 0 33 ALLEY 0 27 0 24 25 8 240 0 24 190 252 14 0 180 280 8 25 210 160 150 148 130 24 4 180 290 0 22 142 140 170 190 200 140 150 170 150 92 200 250 25 0 0 20 4 25 25 0 210 98 0 10 104 0 10 19 0 23 0 258 180 0 23 320 290 250 0 25 0 23 236 230 190 178 160 0 24 24 2 23 8 220 13 0 0 24 250 250 234 200 180 220 170 150 252 4 6 25 25 110 120 140 278 210 332 4 33 33 4 33 2 330 6 26 230 230 252 250 90 258 FRONT 340 2 33 ALLEY 28 0 ATE PRIV 250 248 0 24 90 NDA ARA260 250 230 216 200 210 33 4 336 6 33 320 0 28 JAC 25 0 258 260 260 250 250 0 15 248 2 26 220 170 160 FLORIDA 134 142 210 334 330 330 Balboa Park Water Wise Shed MYRTLE 33 6 33 0 330 338 338 330 290 280 254 250 210 190 150 140 0 13 170 90 84 80 82 80 36 338 340 340 334 330 320 310 300 342 MYRTLE 6 33 UPAS 8 28 254 25 2 264 2 25 150 250 260 2 25 250 16 0 260 0 25 220 200 170 154 140 140 150 150 0 18 150 338 320 27 0 0 27 264 240 0 24 180 252 0 21 160 190 180 180 150 150 240 212 6 25 256 260 240 13 8 96 13 0 15 0 0 29 0 27 260 264 26 6 242 2 40 120 260 270 160 0 26 250 244 180 170 140 340 324 262 260 148 240 90 0 12 340 340 290 256 0 26 4 27 278 0 20 220 26 6 254 260 6 26 6 20 258 278 200 180 170 166 160 210 27 0 270 8 23 230 300 26 4 64 268 2 270 250 240 220 92 144 130 282 278 250 160 136 8 26 280 4 27 274 140 12 14 0 0 80 70 2 26 0 28 250 260 290 270 260 0 27 200 160 150 0 16 180 190 0 22 82 0 10 288 0 28 280 280 260 0 27 250 240 230 220 230 240 240 220 210 200 190 170 150 190 200 90 74 280 260 270 264 0 266 27 21 0 0 84 28 2 280 0 27 270 260 250 250 0 230 24 22 0 0 28 280 260 0 24 170 160 160 190 170 220 210 0 19 88 340 330 TE PRIVA 27 0 0 27 200 0 11 340 342 336 260 280 250 220 174 20 0 102 92 340 340 UPAS 286 0 28 270 22 2 0 30 0 210 20 0 22 NG HI S 90 DR 290 290 292 300 294 8 28 8 27 240 0 24 190 210 240 0 250 25 0 10 340 288 270 260 240 0 26 220 230 220 27 0 0 11 120 90 68 78 72 70 76 66 84 0 13 340 340 34 0 260 286 230 240 230 0 20 0 19 170 170 160 210 230 O ZO 270 80 27 0 260 250 230 220 210 0 18 180 180 200 180 190 200 210 220 228 230 250 260 6 21 R PE 70 80 90 260 0 20 190 210 190 260 280 2 22 11 0 12 0 0 0 1 0 10 70 OFF 60 80 60 62 27 4 270 200 210 0 23 260 250 260 270 280 286 190 180 8 11 SR-94 WB 80 70 274 240 230 210 200 180 210 222 230 250 280 210 200 200 160 0 13 90 70 92 80 80 88 250 230 220 190 0 22 260 278 80 280 2 210 220 0 11 80 84 80 98 100 104 108 90 270 250 242 240 230 232 230 220 210 0 19 0 22 250 240 0 25 0 28 286 220 0 14 0 10 110 6 28 210 200 192 0 25 270 0 27 0 28 0 29 0 29 290 270 240 0 15 100 104 0 102 108 10 06 114 0 1 11 116 100 90 90 90 84 90 90 94 170 16 0 12 0 13 0 280 210 210 200 4 240 23 0 25 0 0 30 0 29 204 11 8 122 112 10 2 270 25 0 270 120 78 86 92 70 64 0 21 280 260 2 30 0 254 27 8 10 96 90 82 70 250 304 280 27 8 0 23 26 270 250 250 280 260 270 290 280 0 28 300 298 298 234 6 15 17 0 280 264 170 18 17 0 0 11 0 0 10 0 18 170 6 17 206 190 0 11 0 10 80 80 0 70 7 ALLEY 90 120 120 100 92 80 90 80 90 94 90 90 84 70 72 90 114 10 8 0 10 90 80 100 100 C N BO 90 90 80 120 N I-5 110 12 0 10 6 18 0 342 8 33 JACARANDA 280 240 0 130 14 210 140 130 120 132 140 130 136 142 130 160 80 70 40 38 38 78 0 30 300 140 0 100 90 0 15 140 3 130 1 0 10 90 86 80 70 88 134 102 106 100 110 108104 114 120 100 118 116 112 100 102 150 110 16 8 100 120 98 100 100 140 160 110 98 100 110 120 112 120 108 108 122 120 110 120 104 100 102 120 110 100 108 110 120 124 132126 130 14 0 280 278 280 280 240 140 180 200 206 210 294 270 0 17 198 186 110 0 11 110 150 150 4 28 28 0 220 17 0 16 0 20 0 220 190 13 2 146 130 110 138 13 0 140 4 13 130 13 6 160 4 13 80 0 11 142 120 130 90 11 120 8 160 64 170 162 1 150 90 4 150 15 170 20 0 220 210 15 0 14 0 120 14 0 13 0 150 172 180 200 210 0 16 15 0 13 0 132 130 120 17 0 16 0 150 170 6 15 148 130 100 14 6 150 16 0 160 0 14 8 20 28 0 29 4 28 2 280 280 PRIVATE 180 190 0 19 180 18 0 170 24 246 6 252 27 0 MYRTLE 340 340 330 0 20 214 202 21 0 200 150 0 18 140 160 210 226 26 0 244 0 22 19 0 230 230 21 0 220 22 0 WEBB 0 18 F 160 OF SB 184 186 2 18 160 154 200 I-5 130 160 160 150 140 0 16 170 160 160 15 0 220 206 20 2 230 21 0 180 170 160 180 160 12 0 160 182 170 240 AR 6 17 BRAISTED 24 0 216 210 SPE 16 4 180 140 15 0 250 170 180 174 178 16 0 20 0 0 20 0 0 0 18 17 17 0 I-5 23 0 210 0 18 140 130 192 168 170 100 106 110 112 110 100 148 17 0 260 260 228 210 160 170 140 130 110 F 0 15 16 0 148 194 19 6 190 2 172 17 SR-163 SB OF 98 148 270 EL C 170 160 148 264 274 170 ATE 204 P HA 240 160 100 100 160 I-5 SB ON ET HE R 0 19 19 0 20 0 19 180 180 180 0 26 0 27 56 2 210 220 140 0 12 110 210 180 180 170 0 25 24 8 230 200 190 190 190 I-5 NB I-5 SB 23 0 250 180 260 240 240 190 SP AC 250 0 18 0 0 20 18 210 0 22 230 256 218 210 192 190 298 300 300 292 6 17 2 28 29 2 4 28 254 240 120 170 190 170 306 300 298 180 230 180 180 140 150 160 170 100 80 4 30 0 19 0 19 2 6 21 19 0 2 0 2 21 40 2 22 0 200 260 280 280 250 190 226 150 108 80 210 220 170 0 21 120 200 190 180 170 160 304 22 0 200 210 200 282 278 284 280 210 220 260 0 23 2 17 2 19 200 0 15 218 210 268 260 220 17 19 0 0 86 86 220 0 23 176 90 1 188 06 00 2 2 210 19 4 290 21 4 198 200 202 82 186 1 168 17 0 220 218 0 19 210 0 21 20 4 0 22 0 19 180 150 140 130 116 120 210 190 200 180 160 150 22 0 0 23 0 22 130 20 8 22 6 230 232 300 21 0 220 IVA TE 4 21 10 2 260 240 0 25 0 24 170 140 23 0 210 24 0 236 250 236 0 23 23 0 0 21 24 0 240 200 0 25 236 24 0 0 23 22 0 230 PA 300 300 E M NA 288 0 21 220 210 270 250 0 23 210 290 280 280 274 270 260 240 190 A RIC E NW 0 23 290 272 ST 190 200 280 276 264 264 262 0 26 22 0 274 0 25 220 272 270 210 IEL D 280 0 29 284 0 27 0 22 0 29 MYRTLE 290 196 280 0 27 260 240 200 230 240 270 170 200 0 27 0 26 0 21 220 28 0 0 260 242 25 268 0 24 250 230 30 2 298 OLD GLOBE 220 240 230 250 260 25 6 0 24 230 19 0 280 230 260 23 0 230 24 2 0 30 260 290 300 240 260 270 0 26 0 17 180 6 29 0 27 25 0 25 0 25 0 24 4 YF 28 6 280 0 0 25 24 0 26 240 230 0 220 21 270 160 138 134 21 2 0 20 256 280 278 2 27 238 240 240 140 180 190 0 30 0 21 200 0 23 210 200 190 160 230 220 180 250 272 262 270 260 180 150 180 200 140 240 0 30 300 RLE 30 0 0 27 0 26 220 260 27 0 MO 30 2 270 250 0 20 0 22 230 220 200 260 280 2 200 190 210 0 25 280 282 0 27 264 22 0 17 1 0 60 28 30 306 0 300 280 270 290 260 270 210 190 240 260 0 192 21 0 0 23 20 220 240 0 21 30 2 250 272 270 EL PRADO 150 0 28 220 214 210 220 230 30 250 2 240 270 260 150 0 30 22 2 0 21 0 26 0 27 0 21 00 2 160 0 19 0 00 19 2 142 0 28 270 260 240 250 230 6 19 184 0 19 250 240 230 0 18 160 160 17 180 0 280 180 0 21 20 0 19 180 0 0 17 284 282 260 230 210 210 270 200 0 19 170 270 220 220 0 28 270 180 0 19 28 0 292 8 28 282 270 300 300 300 290 300 302 4 29 0 28 210 200 160 2 29 0 24 240 250 260 276 220 150 0 29 4 28 0 22 220 4 18 0 19 240 14 8 130 230 240 240 260 250 270 240 0 24 0 28 280 0 24 220 0 26 240 260 240 23 50 0 2 22 0 0 23 22 190 200 172 6 0 16 20 210 184 0 18 2 0 18 17 0 190 0 21 200 0 20 22 0 220 240 0 25 270 270 0 17 290 0 27 290 0 31 286 290 310 300 300 302 304 30 6 300 292 290 300 308 306 302 310 296 306 30 0 300 2 30 290 E AT IV E AT IV PR 280 282 270 250 0 25 224 SR-163 NB OFF 154 6 14 170 120 110 130 68 0 22 230 280 0 26 230 278 260 0 27 0 25 4 27 170 160 13 0 80 70 70 60 48 0 19 190 80 1 140 0 20 190 4 14 60 240 200 PR 80 80 300 300 110 66 50 50 0 0 21 20 200 80 70 278 250 21 0 0 140 15 138 0 148 8 15 14 40 150 2 1 150 50 14 1 160 230 140 80 100 70 50 260 28 2 270 250 280 260 260 288 288 170 180 150 0 15 180 130 90 230 0 24 250 290 284 RUSS 70 50 40 50 210 220 216 200 190 N 0 17 200 120 40 42 42 25 0 230 240 90 82 60 0 25 0 20 0 18 180 O 160 210 230 140 100 0 30 302 0 0 26 25 0 28 264 16 0 60 58 200 190 SB 140 110 90 80 84 76 70 6 23 210 200 63 180 110 270 250 260 240 230 220 218 210 180 SB ON 220 100 0 27 0 240 25 220 200 190 SR-163 190 0 20 120 110 290 300 296 298 292 276 0 22 250 240 230 230 220 21 0 PR 0 26 220 170 -1 120 110 70 50 40 140 110 120 B 130 80 70 58 52 50 50 140 A 70 60 50 54 70 70 50 64 66 156 150 90 60 13 6 120 0 14 90 70 128 130 14 0 160 150 150 140 110 80 60 DATE 158 15 2 0 25 0 24 150 0 17 160 150 130 110 90 70 60 72 70 60 100 80 68 160 17 0 110 120 76 60 0 15 120 130 140 80 80 70 190 0 21 0 19 180 170 220 0 190 20 220 240 90 84 80 130 150 156 170 0 21 D ON C RI 240 TE VA RI 0 22 150 170 4 15 70 ASH 130 150 CEDAR 10 0 90 82 0 150 15 HM 0 23 0 20 SR 90 66 70 72 176 200 0 19 80 90 146 70 110 100 140 4 28 300 0 26 240 0 0 21 120 14 140 0 0 15 156 160 162 1 50 158 160 0 16 120 70 90 BEECH 8 13 170 168 170 160 120 110 100 282 210 200 200 190 210 0 22 0 23 0 20 120 102 70 90 40 0 18 250 0 17 74 90 70 140 130 90 80 70 0 50 14 1 110 100 84 82 88 90 15 4 19 0 172 0 24 22 P 17 0 17 0 160 ON 0 12 90 70 0 21 122 144 0 16 130 132 0 15 SB I-5 130 152 18 0 50 144 1 154 40 148 150 1 146 142 140 140 S 60 0 2 27 230 160 130 0 11 130 120 132 140 142 130 0 10 70 94 3 17 0 0 0 16 17 190 110 210 9 100 120 0 20 110 0 12 110 160 114 130 190 138 98 FF 02 B O2 90 180 100 6 R-1 20 0 0 14 0 15 F OF 90 90 86 152 130 I-5 S 82 110 80 4 100 120 140 150 180 0 14 150 140 144 210 132 2 11 72 70 90 DATE 80 90 90 90 132 I-5 SB ON 170 158 80 72 90 80 180 15 6 10 0 80 88 8 4 11 190 I-5 NB OFF 120 118 90 170 0 14 144 90 80 80 80 ELM 76 94 160 18 0 80 50 0 186 1 1 19 0 17 210 190 150 150 140 74 90 80 220 21 2 146 70 7 0 0 21 160 150 O 100 FF 90 200 180 140 160 12 2 0 20 190 190 210 0 21 0 18 240 190 160 160 120 210 170 150 110 0 10 80 0 14 130 170 150 120 12 0 180 170 170 170 220 178 160 200 184 180 128 130 78 44 220 180 180 0 20 230 210 190 180 13 0 220 190 190 GRAPE 160 11 0 210 4 19 190 FIR 90 50 5 0 210 200 200 192 0 15 150 200 188 170 150 200 8 27 24 0 0 22 0 22 200 190 16 1 0 70 160 15 170 0 146 144 230 206 210 200 0 17 170 160 NB 0 00 22 2 242 234 21 0 216 170 150 22 0 232 HAWTHORN 230 21 0 23 0 190 176 160 70 220 260 0 16 0 22 200 18 0 180 80 6 21 200 210 190 I-5 25 0 IVY 19 0 11 6 20 0 24 0 202 200 12 0 220 214 0 21 238 200 200 O N 240 23 0 190 210 230 250 200 216 96 218 256 250 240 230 240 240 230 210 202 206 220 230 0 0 26 27 70 0 2 28 40 2 0 26 220 252 250 250 250 20 4 214 218 140 0 23 240 8 25 224 220 218 208 250 2 50 26 0 230 250 254 0 28 0 27 200 24 0 250 258 24 0 22 0 16 0 250 260 4 25 230 0 22 KALMIA 230 250 260 26 0 8 25 230 210 240 0 25 0 25 230 212 238 160 230 0 24 286 290 30 4 288 280 190 0 26 0 26 250 25 0 200 80 250 0 28 290 288 29 4 290 UPAS 280 270 200 264 240 MAPLE JUNIPER 90 23 0 26 0 27 6 270 MYRTLE 290 27 0 190 210 214 NB 190 200 10 220 2 288 266 264 280 ALLEY 260 17 0 170 260 230 120 0 18 0 25 210 14 2 6 172 17 2 25 268 246 ALLEY 270 280 29 8 302 0 19 260 250 270 200 0 22 0 24 23 0 180 274 26 0 290 0 25 200 250 270 242 236 0 16 230 220 200 186 270 250 260 240 270 260 252 250 24 0 270 240 250 250 260 280 270 270 8 280 28 284 280 282 270 8 28 280 270 260 250 240 282 280 270 250 23 0 210 190 270 190 200 162 270 24 0 260 282 250 0 20 0 22 270 272 230 130 220 230 250 220 27 0 240 160 0 22 23 0 240 21 0 NUTMEG 4 23 190 230 250 0 26 40 2 250 264 0 240 24 230 168 200 266 0 24 250 260 270 0 28 26 0 250 200 210 200 220 230 240 250 0 25 276 LAUREL 180 0 23 266 270 282 278 276 282 280 238 17 0 0 24 0 25 280 270 280 0 28 282 240 I-5 260 0 27 290 294 26 0 260 OLIVE 270 270 25 0 0 21 250 28 4 274 0 22 0 230 0 22 25 0 24 270 250 220 240 0 26 288 288 280 240 208 290 280 280 4 20 OLIVE 286 PALM 2 27 212 200 70 82 170 1 184 1 4 160 16 150 170 156 150 0 150 160 150 146 148 144 15 8 140 0 16 138 16 8 2 15 18 134 2 190 0 17 21 6 4 202 220 13 15 4 230 8 17 200 15 0 210 19 23 0 0 27 28 0 278 0 26 230 270 220 210 284 280 280 220 180 0 19 170 180 6 160 16 190 240 0 17 178 0 20 200 194 21 0 200 REDWOOD 270 250 22 0 230 270 270 228 254 0 21 240 0 19 288 280 QUINCE 24 0 240 260 292 0 28 260 260 276 270 250 230 208 230 230 150 170 190 196 270 260 0 40 22 250 2 0 23 270 260 240 0 25 230 27 6 292 0 28 0 28 264 224 6 20 REDWOOD 266 PALM 288 258 250 278 226 214 216 0 29 280 240 0 21 0 24 0 26 260 280 240 260 284 270 0 23 22 2 0 1 0 290 280 0 27 262 294 260 288 SPRUCE 4 244 2 23 6 224 23 10 2 22 202 212 220 210 230 28 8 282 0 270 26 290 270 240 224 220 202 196 206 210 270 0 29 280 264 260 250 240 THORN 26 0 27 0 29 0 290 220 24 0 296 298 278 276 23 210 0 216 190 204 196 168 174 90 184 194 1 4 220 21 202 222 226 24 0 0 24 0 26 294 294 294 290 UPAS UPAS 6 21 250 240 280 270 WALNUT 27 0 280 286 0 29 0 29 270 IVY 290 296 0 29 290 4 29 292 270 294 0 29 284 268 296 0 29 278 210 25 0 270 0 24 278 290 296 290 292 288 29 0 268 272 280 Plot Date: 01/27/12
  • 38. Note: With an average yearly rainfall of 10.29 inches for this area of the county, the 2,500 acres watershed that drains through Balboa Park produces almost 68 million gallons. Captured and properly treated, this water could irrigate the park for the entire year. Mid-City:Normal Heights Uptown Greater North Park Balboa Park Greater Golden Hill Centre City Legend City Comm. Plan Area Balboa Park Watershed Natural Drainage Storm Drains 40-foot Contours 200-foot Contours Balboa Park Natural Drainage and Storm Drain System ± Presented by Balboa Park Cultural Partnership 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 Miles Map prepared by Brian K. Glenn, May 2009 Source: SanGIS and ESRI; watershed extrapolated
  • 39. ALLEY RAY MYRTLE MYRTLE ALLEY City Buildings E AT IV PR TE VA I PR REDWOOD GRIM ALLEY Red: THORN Band_1 Green: Band_2 ALLEY ND Blue: Band_3 TE PRIVA SPRUCE ALLEY GRANADA SR -1 63 NB O FF 28TH ZOO REDWOOD QUINCE Ortho2011_West ALLEY O HM C RI Roads RGB DALE SPRUCE 29TH D NDA ARA JAC E AT IV PR FRONT PRIVATE ALLEY THORN ALLEY PRIVATE 02ND JACARANDA FIE L Parcels 31ST UPAS UPAS UPAS MO RLE Y Balboa Park Water Legend Wise Shed 30TH 29TH GRANADA UTAH ALLEY ALLEY VILLA ALLEY ARNOLD ALLEY UPAS UPAS PARK VILLA ARIZONA TEXAS MYRTLE LOUISIANA MISSISSIPPI ALLEY ALABAMA GEORGIA CRESTWOOD ALLEY WILSHIRE ALLEY MYRTLE ALLEY WALNUT ALBERT VERMONT MYRTLE PARK HERBERT 07TH PRIVATE ALLEY 04TH ALLEY 03RD ALLEY 01ST ALLEY IVY INDIANA ALLEY ALLEY REDWOOD 31ST ALLEY ALLEY 29TH LILAC 63 -1 SR OLIVE OLIVE PALM ON BALBOA SB SR-163 PALM PALM ALLEY QUINCE OLIVE N O FRONT SB NUTMEG OLD GLOBE MAPLE PA SE O ST WE N ALLEY SP AC ET ALLEY ALLEY HE ATE R JUNIPER ALLEY AM IVY 30TH AM SR-163 N B ALLEY HAWTHORN PA N PR IVA TE FERN SR163 HAWTHORN ER IC AN ON SB OFF PA N IVY DULZURA DE O RO KALMIA LE AP M CAPITAN PLAZA DE PANAMA ALLEY ER IC AN ICA ER M NA PA LA UR EL EA ST SR- SR-163 163 S NB B JUNIPER Y KALMIA L RE U LA LAUREL FLORIDA EL PRADO MAPLE O ZO VILLAGE ATE PRIV LE AL MAPLE LAUREL AME ING L BUR SAN MARCOS 01ST NUTMEG 30TH SR-163 NB OFF NUTMEG ALLEY GRAPE WIL SO BOB ALLEY GROVE 31ST 29TH CE NT RO GOLF COURSE Map made exclusively for our client by the ALLEY 30TH B ALLEY For reprints, mapping or additional information please contact SanGIS. 29TH 26TH 25TH 24TH 23RD 22ND 21ST San Diego Geographic Information Source 5201 Ruffin Road, Suite E San Diego, CA 92123 (858) 874-7000 www.sangis.org ALLEY ALLEY 20TH 17TH 15TH 14TH 13TH I-5 NB OFF 19TH 16TH 11TH 10TH ALLEY ± A 27TH 17TH 04TH C OFF SR-94 WB 06TH GROVE DALE GRANADA PE RS HI NG RUSS ALLEY B 580 Feet Vicinity Map ASH RUSS ALLEY 07TH 09TH 05TH 03RD 26TH ST HILL GOLDEN N NG HI S ER P DR TO 10TH CEDAR BEECH A 145 290 1 inch = 300 feet O NB I-5 ASH 0 FF BEECH DATE O SB FF CEDAR I-5 CA M I-5 SB ON DATE I-5 BO I-5 S N BO 5S I- DATE WEBB WE LCH FF F OF BRAISTED AR SPE O 63 R-1 S I-5 SB ON F SR-163 SB OF NB I-5 NB OFF SR-163 NB ON SR-163 NB O FF I-5 ELM I-5 NB I-5 SB PRESIDENTS ELM PRIVATE FERN PRIVATE WEBER FIR N I-5 SB OFF O 08TH NB 02ND I-5 PRIVATE 08TH AVENUE FIR N L PE HA C GRAPE THIS MAP/DATA IS PROVIDED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Note: This product may contain information from the SANDAG Regional Information System which cannot be reproduced without the written permission of SANDAG. This product may contain information reproduced with permission granted by RAND MCNALLY & COMPANY® to SanGIS. This map is copyrighted by RAND MCNALLY & COMPANY®. It is unlawful to copy or reproduce all or any part thereof, whether for personal use or resale, without the prior, written permission of RAND MCNALLY & COMPANY®. Copyright SanGIS 2009 - All Rights Reserved. Full text of this legal notice can be found at: http://www.sangis.org/Legal_Notice.htm Plot Date: 01/27/12