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Case Studies: Odum School of Ecology + Chatham University Eden Hall Campus Master Plan
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Case Studies: Odum School of Ecology + Chatham University Eden Hall Campus Master Plan

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Case Studies: Odum School of Ecology + Chatham University Eden Hall Campus Master Plan

Case Studies: Odum School of Ecology + Chatham University Eden Hall Campus Master Plan

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  • Create a pedagogical learning and research environment
  • The existing site area, west to DW Brooks and south to Green St, will be transformed into a series of natural working systems that support Ecology, Forestry and other UGA curricula. New outdoor educational settings – Sustainable habitats, wetlands, grasslands, and streams – will demonstrate the power of landscape to restore plant and animal diversity, stream ecologies, watersheds and soils.
  • Section perspective looking east showing concept ideas for creating a new habitat.The enriched experience provides extensive green roofs planted in conjunction with lab curriculum to attract desired species; integrated green walls for shading and habitat; and rainwater capture and reuse to develop wetlands, grasslands and streams.
  • An overview of the biodiversity zones going west to DW Brooks and south to Green St. The sensitivity and diversity of developing the site this way offers a more appropriate headwaters condition, increases habitat potential, offers curriculum opportunities and provides readily accessible public demonstration areas.
  • The site of the Odum School of Ecology is at the intersection of two main pedestrian thoroughfares of the University of Georgia Campus. Our vision for this gateway connection is to increase the outreach of our and our neighboring schools’ work via the experience of just walking by. Cultural amenities unique to the function of the School of Ecology are readily accessible within the interior courtyard
  • The section perspective (looking east) above shows the advantages of providing orientation to solar south.The building is designed to face solar south, providing the best access to both passive and active strategies available daily from sunlight. 100% of all interior spaces will be naturally daylit. Access to daylight has been shown to increase productivity and accuracy of building users. Use of photovoltaics (solar panels) will be the primary energy source for the school. Solar panels will be located on the roof, on grade and integrated into the building façade and shading devices.
  • The section perspective (looking East) above shows a design concept of how the two main species of the building lab (left) and office (right) act in natural ventilation mode.Every time the building or a portion of the building operates in natural ventilation mode the Odum School’s impact on the environment is reduced. The office wing uses a double skin facade on the south side and accepts fresh air from the summer dominant WNW winds. Lab research spaces receive air from operable windows on the south side and exhaust air through the filtered mechanical system.
  • The section perspective (looking East) above shows a design concept of how the two main species of the building lab (left) and office (right) act in mechanical ventilation mode.In the Office wing uses an underfloor air system, delivering the air where it is needed most. This system lowers air delivery temperature, reducing the energy required for cooling while providing individual control over the airflow and direction. Lab areas use an efficient overhead supply system with a heat exchange recovery wheel on the return side to capture reusable heat as the conditioned air leaves the exhaust stack.
  • The project site area straddles a ridge that divides two drainage areas which are both part of the Oconee watershed. Current site design rapidly puts all storm water into pipes sending it away. Environmentally regenerative and restorative techniques at the new site development will create attractive, usable and educational habitat zones along the exposed waterways.
  • Section perspective looking east showing concept ideas for creating a new habitat.The enriched experience provides extensive green roofs planted in conjunction with lab curriculum to attract desired species; integrated green walls for shading and habitat; and rainwater capture and reuse to develop wetlands, grasslands and streams.
  • Understanding the climate of the area you inhabit is paramount to success for many things including building design. This climate chart depicts the basics of our natural system which have an affect on how we design, construct, operate and use our built environments.
  • Established preservation strategies for surface water systems and habitat corridors
  •  
  • Consumption of imported food of imported food coincides with peak academic activityAnnual rainfall distribution favors summer months and growing seasonBUT water demand for human consumption and agricultural activities outstrips both surface and groundwater resources.
  • Water disposal from constructed wetlands: This graphic shows where to dispose of “waste” water safely according to current health regulations. Accordingly, disposal areas must not allow for human contactThis is NOT the highest and best use of this water as it is largely clean. As we monitor the quality of this effluent here and in other locations within PA, we hope to use this water to irrigate agricultural areas, thereby closing the loop in a way that is effective environmentally, economically, and socially.

Case Studies: Odum School of Ecology + Chatham University Eden Hall Campus Master Plan Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Odum School of EcologyA Case StudyThe Odum School of Ecology, founded upon Eugene Odum’sapproach for ecosystem ecology, is building a new home thatfunctions as a living laboratory and fosters regenerativesymbiotic relationships between humans and natural systems..
  • 2. Project Vision―Our understanding of emerging global economic and environmental issues leads us to forge a sustainable building ethic for the world’s first college-level ecology program— the Odum School of Ecology. Our goal is a building that is ecologically resilient, socially just and economically sound.‖
  • 3. Collaboration Laboratory NORTH OCONEE RIVERODUM Office/Education Building Habitat
  • 4. Odum School of Ecology – University of Georgia at Athens – Athens, Georgia
  • 5. PEDAGOGY CURRENT FUTURETo create change, the building and site will serve as a LEARNINGmultidisciplinary and interdisciplinary transparent livinglaboratory available to everyone. CURRENT FUTURE RESEARCH DOLLARS
  • 6. 2 8 5 2 5 6 5 9 11 1 2 6 6 7 7 9 3 4 10 109 10 10 10 1. Balconies 7. Sun shades and light shelves 2. Green roofs 8. Rooftop greenhouse 3. Courtyard stream 9. facades” Sustainable habitats, wetlands, grasslands and stream 4. Eco-machine 10. Lawn and ground cover test areas, organic and container farming test 5. Rooftop photovoltaic panels areas and demonstration gardens 6. Green walls 11. “Breathing
  • 7. Potential research area Outdoor classroom HARDMAN Environmental classroom A ECOL 1000 ECOL 3000 Plant and Animal Abundance (courtyard and garden) H B ECOL 3700 ODUM Agroforesty in Historic Garden A C ECOL 3700 ECOL 4271 Agrofestry in Historic Garden I D ECOL 3520 D Environmental Toxicology & Restoration (courtyard & garden) E ECOL 4010 ODUM Earth Sheltered Architecture E F ECOL 8220 Stream EcologyFORESTRY G ECOL 3500 ECOL 8650 Lawn and Ground-cover Study Area B with Nutrient Cycling H ECOL 4100 ECOL 8660 Soil Biology Study for Ground Covers I ECOL 4020 ECOL 4310 LIFE SCIENCES On-Campus Watershed Comparisons - F Piped and Daylit The existing site area, west to DW G Brooks and south to Green St, will be transformed into a series of natural working systems that support C Ecology, Forestry and other UGA curricula. New outdoor educational settings – Sustainable habitats, wetlands, grasslands, and streams – will demonstrate the power of landscape to restore plant and animal diversity, stream ecologies, watersheds and soils.
  • 8. Looking north through south research plot at main building entry
  • 9. Interior view showing eco-machine and green roof at entry lobby
  • 10. BIODIVERSITYEmbracing ecological diversity, complexity and resilience, theproject will allow natural systems to self organize, heal andregenerate ecological processes. This, in turn, will provide CURRENT FUTUREfood, fiber and shelter for living species including humans. SPECIES
  • 11. Building Section 8 7 9 12 13 11 14 10 6 6 1 2 3 4 5 1. Mechanical, Storage, Overflow 9. Green Wall, Green Roof 2. Laboratories 10. Green House 3. Circulation, Garden Commons 11. Living Wall 4. Courtyard (Stream, Trees, Living Laboratories) 12. Balconies 5. Offices, Administration, Café 13. Photovoltaics 6. Auditorium, Exhibit Space, Entry, Eco-Machine 14. Access between levels and green roof 7. Green Roof 15. Double skin facade 8. Mechanical Room
  • 12. Piedmont forest Riparian corridor HARDMAN Native meadow Permaculture Arboretum ODUM Environmental classroom ODUMFORESTRY LIFE SCIENCES An overview of the biodiversity zones going west to DW Brooks and south to Green St. The sensitivity and diversity of developing the site this way offers a more appropriate headwaters condition, increases habitat potential, offers curriculum opportunities and provides readily accessible public demonstration areas.
  • 13. Looking East thru courtyard at building collaboration space
  • 14. LIVIBILITYBy encouraging interaction and collaboration amount theuniversity, all sectors of the environmental community, and thegeneral public, and by incorporating the healthiest building CURRENT FUTUREpractices, this project will create inspiring and healthy indoorand outdoor spaces where people ling to work, study and visit. ATTRACTION/RETENTION
  • 15. Small auditorium Open air amphitheater classroomLarge auditorium Amphitheater classroom enclosed for cold weather TEACHING SPACES
  • 16. Cultural Amenities Primary Circulation Environmental Classroom HARDMAN 1 Mary Kahrs Warnell Garden 2 Environmental Café 3 Auditorium ODUM 4 Courtyard 4 1 2 ODUM 3FORESTRY LIFE SCIENCES The site of the Odum School of Ecology is at the intersection of two main pedestrian thoroughfares of the University of Georgia Campus. Our vision for this gateway connection is to increase the outreach of our and our neighboring schools’ work via the experience of just walking by. Cultural amenities unique to the function of the School of Ecology are readily accessible within the interior courtyard
  • 17. ENERGYThe building will operate on a carbon neutral basis thatdemonstrates appropriate demand and supply technologies CURRENT FUTUREat various scales. CARBON FOOTPRINT
  • 18. Natural Daylight A 1 5 4 3 6 3 B 7 2 1. 100% of south windows sheltered from summer sun 6. Light louvers to maximize internal daylighting 2. Deciduous trees for summer sun protection 7. Clerestory lights deeper internal spaces 3. Building profiles allow daylighting into courtyard and lower levels of lab wing A. ECOL 3100 4. East and west elevations to have limited amount of glass Greenhouse for Tropical Habitats with green wall protection B. ECOL 4700 5. Photovoltaic panels to produce 100% of power Soil Lab Wall
  • 19. Natural Ventilation 1 4 2 3 B A 1. Corridors ventilated by natural convection A. ECOL 3520 2. Exhaust through operable skylights Environmental Toxicology and Restoration 3. Fresh air vegetated courtyard (naturally tempered B. ECOL 4100 ECOL 8660 and cleaned) Soil Biology Study for Ground Covers 4. Double skin facade acts as convection chimney providing stack effect
  • 20. Mechanical Ventilation 1 7 2 8 3 7 10 11 A 4 9 9 12 56 1. Exhaust from labs through heat exchanger 8. Low flow fume hood exhaust system in labs 2. Variable frequency air handler served by chiller or boiler 9. Underfloor air supply 3. Overhead distribution to labs 10. Return air used for lab make up air 4. Chiller 11. Underfloor air distribution system in offices 5. Pre-chilled water from existing water tank 12. Interior plants provide natural cooling effect 6. Ground coupling system 7. Fresh air intake passes by green roof through green wall A. ECOL 4010 and through heat exchanger Earth Sheltered Architecture
  • 21. Existing Energy CycleNew Energy Cycle80%LESS ENERGY
  • 22. WATEROccupying a headwater to the Oconee River watershed, theproject will celebrate water by conserving and regeneratingfreshwater cycles, directly linking the building site to the river. CURRENT FUTURE QUALITY + QUANTITY
  • 23. RIPARIAN CORRIDOR RAINWATER COLLECTION AREA DRAINAGE ARE DIVIDE 1 HEADWATER OF TWO STREAMS 2 2 RESTORE/DALIGHT HISTORIC STREAM 3 POTENTIAL RIPARIAN CORRIDOR A A ECOL 4020 ECOL 4310 On-campus Watershed Comparisons 1 Piped and Daylit Historic Stream B ECOL 8220 Stream Ecology 3 The project site area straddles a ridge that divides two drainage areas which are both part of the Oconee watershed. Current site design rapidly puts all storm waterB into pipes sending it away. Environmentally regenerative and restorative techniques at the new site development will create attractive, usable and educational habitat zones along the exposed waterways.
  • 24. Water Systems 1 3 2 4 10 9 B 6 11 5 A 8 12 7 1. Green roofs drain to water tank. overflow to stream/irrigation 1. Waste water from lavatories, sinks and toilets to Eco-machine 2. De-ionized water to labs 2. Water from Eco-machine service to toilets 3. Green roof 3. Clarifying tank/stream 4. De-ionizer 4. Eco. machine tanks 5. City water 5. Settling tank 6. Overflow from chiller to stream/irrigation 7. Water tank (recycled fuel tank) filled from roof drainage and A. ECOL 8220 - Stream Ecology condensation from chiller B. ECOL 8150 - Wetland Ecology
  • 25. Existing Water CycleNew Water Cycle75%REDUCTION
  • 26. NUTRIENT CYCLINGMimicking nature, the building will operate waste-free byintegrating natural systems and adopting and inventing CURRENT FUTUREsustainable operating practices that harvest nutrients. NUTRIENT CYCLING
  • 27. FARM CAFETERIA ECO-MACHINE
  • 28. Existing Material Cycle New Material CycleZERO WASTE
  • 29. Climate Chart
  • 30. Intuitive Ideas
  • 31. Scientific Studies
  • 32. Odum School of EcologyUniversity of GeorgiaLong Term Ownership Cost Model Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 33. Odum Comparisons- 5% Cost of Capital (50 year range)Includes: Construction Costs, Operating costs, Maintenance Costs, Replacement Costs for Mechanical and RoofingAssumption: Odum maintenance Costs 1.5 times the cost of Coverdell maintenanceNote: Lamar Dodd School of Art is a different building type and typically uses less energy and costs less than a Lab Building Odum Lab Building ( 140,000 s.f.) Coverdall Building (146,769) $250,000,000 Lamar Dodd School of Art (167,000) Coverdell $201,667,928 $200,000,000 Lamar Dodd School of Art $135,284,226 $150,000,000 Coverdell $105,751,884 Odum $90,893,967 $100,000,000 Odum $99,299,105 Lamar Dodd School of Art $81,163,040 $50,000,000 $- 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Years Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 34. Odum Comparisons- 5% Cost of Capital (50 year range) Includes: Construction Costs, Operating costs, Maintenance Costs, Replacement Costs for Mechanical and Roofing Assumption: Odum maintenance Costs 1.5 times the cost of Coverdell maintenance Note: Lamar Dodd School of Art is a different building type and typically uses less energy and costs less than a Lab Building 50 year Breakout of Costs - 5% Cost of Capital NPV $250,000,000 Water Costs Energy Costs $200,000,000 Maintenance Costs Design Fees Replacement CostsLife Cycle Cost $150,000,000 Capital Costs Assume: -5% inflation for gas $100,000,000 and electric rates -1.5% inflation for everything else $50,000,000 -5% cost of capital -30year analysis - 20 year replacement of $- major mech and Lamar Dodd School of Art Coverdall Building (146,769) Odum Lab Building ( 140,000 s.f.) roof. (167,000) Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 35. Odum Comparisons- 5% Cost of Capital (30 year range) Includes: Construction Costs, Operating costs, Maintenance Costs, Replacement Costs for Mechanical and Roofing Assumption: Odum maintenance Costs 1.5 times the cost of Coverdell maintenance Note: Lamar Dodd School of Art is a different building type and typically uses less energy and costs less than a Lab Building $250,000,000 Water Costs Energy Costs Maintenance Costs $200,000,000 Design Fees Replacement Costs Capital CostsLife Cycle Cost $150,000,000 Assume: -5% inflation for gas and electric rates $100,000,000 -1.5% inflation for everything else -5% cost of capital -30year analysis $50,000,000 - 20 year $- Lamar Dodd School of Art Coverdall Building (146,769) Odum Lab Building ( 140,000 (167,000) s.f.) Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 36. Odum Comparisons- Putting a cost on CarbonCost of Carbon Offsets -5% Cost of Capital NPVCosts: $10 a ton – 5% increase per yearNote: Princeton University uses $40 / ton as a baseline (based on Europe’s carbon trading rate)$16,000,000.00 Lamar Dodd School of Art Coverdell Building Coverdell $12,845,762$14,000,000.00$12,000,000.00$10,000,000.00 $8,000,000.00 Lamar Dodd School of Art $6,000,000.00 $7,328,364 Coverdell $4,076,741 $4,000,000.00 $2,000,000.00 Lamar Dodd School of Art $2,325,735 $0.00 0 10 20 30 40 50 Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 37. Odum Comparisons - With Carbon Offsets - 5% Cost of Capital NPV Includes: Construction Costs, Operating costs, Maintenance Costs, Replacement Costs for Mechanical and Roofing. Carbon Offsets are included for Coverdell and Lamar Dodd School of Art at a costs of $10 per ton, 5% increase per year. Note: Princeton University uses $40 / ton as a baseline (based on Europe’s carbon trading rate) Odum Lab Building ( 140,000 s.f.) Coverdall Building (146,769) $250,000,000 Lamar Dodd School of Art (167,000) Coverdell $214,513,690 $200,000,000 Lamar Dodd School of Art $142,612,590 $150,000,000Net Present Value Coverdell $109,828,625 Odum $99,299,105 Odum $90,893,967 $100,000,000 Lamar Dodd School of Art $83,488,776 $50,000,000 $- 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Years Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 38. Odum Comparisons With Carbon Offsets - 5% Cost of Capital NPV (50 Year Range) Includes: Construction Costs, Operating costs, Maintenance Costs, Replacement Costs for Mechanical and Roofing. Carbon Offsets are included for Coverdell and Lamar Dodd School of Art at a costs of $10 per ton, 5% increase per year. Note: Princeton University uses $40 / ton as a baseline (based on Europe’s carbon trading rate) $250,000,000 Carbon Water Costs $200,000,000 Energy Costs Maintenance Costs Design Fees $150,000,000Life Cycle Cost Replacement Costs Capital Costs $100,000,000 Assume: -5% inflation for gas and electric rates -1.5% inflation for $50,000,000 everything else -5% cost of capital -50 year analysis $- - 20 year Lamar Dodd School of Art Coverdall Building (146,769) Odum Lab Building ( 140,000 s.f.) replacement of (167,000)
  • 39. Odum Comparisons With Carbon Offsets - 5% Cost of Capital NPV (30 Year Range) Includes: Construction Costs, Operating costs, Maintenance Costs, Replacement Costs for Mechanical and Roofing. Carbon Offsets are included for Coverdell and Lamar Dodd School of Art at a costs of $10 per ton, 5% increase per year. Note: Princeton University uses $40 / ton as a baseline (based on Europe’s carbon trading rate) Carbon $250,000,000 Water Costs Energy Costs Maintenance Costs $200,000,000 Design FeesLife Cycle Cost Replacement Costs $150,000,000 Capital Costs Assume: -5% inflation for gas $100,000,000 and electric rates, -1.5% inflation for everything else -5% cost of capital $50,000,000 -30year analysis - 20 year replacement of major mech and roof. $- Lamar Dodd School of Art Coverdall Building (146,769) Odum Lab Building ( 140,000 s.f.) (167,000)
  • 40. Costs to Society for Health Care Costsfrom Pollutants from Source Production, NO2, SO2 , CO2.- 5% NPVHarvard School of Medicine study $18,000,000.00 $16,267,801.74 $16,000,000.00 $15,608,351.15 $14,949,962.71 $14,293,022.15 $14,000,000.00 $13,637,951.12 $12,985,209.80 $12,335,299.74 $12,000,000.00 $11,688,766.79 $11,046,204.34 $10,408,256.65 $10,000,000.00 $9,775,622.48 $9,149,058.96 $9,280,599.37 $8,904,390.17 $8,529,385.61 $8,528,786.91 $8,154,009.65 $8,000,000.00 $7,917,488.75 $7,780,298.94 $7,314,326.09 $7,407,917.30 $7,037,150.86 $6,720,931.70 $6,668,311.03 $6,138,421.18 $6,301,736.32 $6,000,000.00 $5,937,794.28 $5,567,997.30 $5,576,883.55 $5,219,436.05 $5,010,955.88 $4,865,919.32 $4,468,692.12 $4,516,838.98 $4,172,741.42 $4,000,000.00 $3,942,707.28 $3,834,216.54 $3,434,615.78 $3,501,900.79 $3,176,480.33 $2,946,152.82 $2,858,694.42 $2,479,182.37 $2,549,338.99 $2,249,270.51 $2,000,000.00 $2,035,705.72 $1,959,409.98 $1,680,747.31 Lamar Dodd School of Art $1,617,870.56 $1,414,345.88 $1,227,980.62 $1,161,347.40 Coverdell Building $922,977.10 $868,505.90 $700,549.24 $542,093.53 $495,472.92 $309,258.31 $251,579.32 $143,523.19 $0.00 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 41. Human Health and Productivity - 5% NPVBased on the most recent studies, buildings designed with some of the characteristics of the Odum building have shown increases inhuman heath and productivity – 3.8% increase. modeled $60,000,000 Staff Productivity Increase Total $54,686,436 Faculty Productivity Increase Undergraduate Productivity Increase $50,000,000 Graduate Productivity Increase Total Human Heath and Productivity Costs $40,000,000 Faculty $34,094,856 $30,000,000 Total $17,355,331 $20,000,000 Graduate / Undergraduate $7,955,224 $10,000,000 Staff $4,681,132 $- 0 10 20 30 40 50 Odum School of Ecology B N I M
  • 42. “The future belongs to those who give the next generation reason to hope.” Teihard de Chardin
  • 43. A Splendid VisionCHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLANA Case Study
  • 44. VisionServing the needs of current and future generations, Chatham University at Eden Hall will serveas a beacon to those who wish to imagine and model sustainable learning and living. Throughscholarly training and research, Eden Hall Campus will create entrepreneurs and advocatescapable of implementing sustainable ideas and sharing them with a global community. In sodoing, Chatham will proudly advance the legacy of Rachel Carson, class of 1929.
  • 45. Local Environmental Context
  • 46. 1 Existing Lodge 2 Mueller House Existing Barns 21
  • 47. How it works
  • 48. Robust Natural EnvironmentCreate a Climate Protect Regenerate Protect Arable LandPositive Streams and Forest LandsDevelopment Waterways
  • 49. Site AssessmentZero-OrderStreams:Most importantto water qualityon-site anddownstream75’ forested bufferprotects waterquality300’ forested bufferprotects ecosystemstructure
  • 50. Site AssessmentDevelopment Opportunities: Best Suited Development Zones
  • 51. Campus Landscapes: Building and Site Integration Strategy
  • 52. Built EnvironmentDesign a flexible Use state-of-the- Repurpose Provide and inspiring art sustainable existing abundant learning building facilities campus environment solutions amenities
  • 53. Campus Landscapes: Building and Site Integration Strategy
  • 54. Regional Average Eden Hall Campus 168kBTU/sf/yr 20 kBTU/sf/yr
  • 55. Materiality
  • 56. Campus Precincts Elsalma District Mueller Campus Center Elizabeth Meadows Thoreau Cottages Stanford Hill
  • 57. Campus Plan
  • 58. Barn Complex
  • 59. Embedded Housing