How Free is Free?: Building courses with OERs

918 views
885 views

Published on

How Free is Free?: Building courses with OERs
Presenters:
Griff Richards and Tanya Elias, Athabasca University
2010 ETUG Spring Workshop (see session descriptions http://etug.ca/?page_id=835)

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
918
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

How Free is Free?: Building courses with OERs

  1. 1. How Free is Free? Building University Courses from Open Educational Resources Griff Richards & Tanya Elias griff@sfu.ca [email_address] ETUG BC, Victoria 07 June 2010
  2. 2. Look OER Participants University of the West Indies (Barbados)
  3. 3. What do we mean by “Open”? <ul><li>1970- Open Education = any adult could enroll, no prerequisite barriers </li></ul><ul><li>2000- Open Source = anyone could modify/ use computer code for free </li></ul><ul><li>Open Educational Resources = Free to use/ copy/ modify/ republish </li></ul>
  4. 4. Why Open Educational Resources? <ul><li>1. The increasing demand for education (especially in the developing world) can not be met with current cost models. </li></ul><ul><li>OER can reduce costs of course development by using “free” content. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Academic papers on research results are mostly paid for by governments, but publishers own the copyright and limit circulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Open content can increase circulation of scientific knowledge. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Examples OER Projects <ul><li>MIT – Open Knowledge Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>BC Campus – SOL*R </li></ul><ul><li>COL WikiEducator </li></ul><ul><li>U Cape Town – OER Project </li></ul>
  6. 6. Example - MIT Toru Iiyoshi
  7. 7. Example OER Project
  8. 8. Examples OER Projects
  9. 9. Examples OER Projects <ul><li>U Cape Town – OER “round up” </li></ul><ul><li>Inform faculty </li></ul><ul><li>Identify materials </li></ul><ul><li>Install Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Control of IP </li></ul>
  10. 10. AU-UWI OER Pilot Project <ul><li>“ Is it practical to develop university courses using OERs?” </li></ul><ul><li>University of the West Indies and Athabasca University </li></ul><ul><li>March 2010 – Barbados – Use OERs to develop curriculum outlines for 6 courses </li></ul><ul><li>Funding from Canada Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. </li></ul>
  11. 11. OER Pilot Project <ul><li>Step 1 - Select 6 modules in area of common interest (Instructional Design) </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 - Find and review available OER </li></ul><ul><li>from list of 30 relevant OER sites </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3 - Week long workshop of course developers/ experts to integrate OERs </li></ul>
  12. 12. Searching for OERs <ul><li>Where to start? </li></ul><ul><li>Before beginning our searches we met to develop some criteria for assessing quality. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on those discussions, a basic survey form was built to record OERs as they were located. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>We used this basic survey form to record our results. </li></ul><ul><li>We conducted six separate searches during which we spent a combined total of over 60 hours searching and recorded a total of 133 OERs. </li></ul><ul><li>All the records are available at: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.surveymonkey.com/sr.aspx?sm=TtwfYyJEB1V1uaBnM5DmDTC679deaS1IgT4CenVFnfA_3d </li></ul>
  14. 14. Before the Search <ul><li>Where to start? </li></ul><ul><li>Before beginning our searches we met to develop some criteria for assessing quality. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on those discussions, a basic survey form was built to record OERs as they were located. </li></ul>
  15. 15. We started with a list of 47 OER links available at: uwi-au.wikispaces.com/OER-Links The first search strategy was to look for OERs within these sites, an approach that was somewhat productive, but also presented problems. Search Strategy #1
  16. 16. Leave the repositories and search the Internet using general searches and socials bookmarking. This strategy located some surprising results. Search Strategy #2
  17. 17. Six Tips for OER Searching <ul><li>Try varying search terms. </li></ul><ul><li>Scroll through relevant repository categories rather than using search tool. </li></ul><ul><li>Check for copyright information and read the “terms of use”; being in a repository doesn’t always mean it’s open and there are many good OERs outside of repositories. </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat searches; new resources are always being added. </li></ul><ul><li>Use “data usage” search feature in Google. </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of varying levels of content quality. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Results of Search for relevant OER <ul><li>1. Google. </li></ul><ul><li>Google search is fastest method for finding sources of OER. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Repositories (list at http://uwi-au.wikispaces.com/OER-Links ) </li></ul><ul><li>Repositories provide deeper results, </li></ul><ul><li>but poor metadata makes them less efficient. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Format, Focus and content Quality is varied. </li></ul><ul><li>An OER may be relevant, but it may not fit the time, scope or audience. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Ownership and Usage rights are not clearly indicated . </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Can I use it? Does OER contain other people’s content? </li></ul>
  19. 19. Lawrence Lessig: Creative Commons license enables re-use http://www.openculture.com/2010/03/lawrence_lessig_tedxnyed.html
  20. 20. UWI-AU Project Team
  21. 21. Example Course Outline
  22. 22. Results of OER integration into modules <ul><li>1. Yes , there are an abundance of OER </li></ul><ul><li>We found OER for almost every topic! </li></ul><ul><li>2. Size is varied . </li></ul><ul><li>Some complete modules, others short resources. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Localization is the main issue . </li></ul><ul><li>Not all the resources could be easily adapted. </li></ul><ul><li>Language, Context and Length of Object main problems. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Introductions needed to provide context </li></ul><ul><li>An OER may be relevant, but most need explanation of relevance and directions on what learner is to do with them. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Most OER text or PPT slides – very little dynamic/ interactive content Social content is difficult to integrate into a course. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Clothing Analogy <ul><li>Custom Tailor: best fit but takes time, can be expensive (Emperor’s new clothes) </li></ul><ul><li>Retail Store: good fit with standard sizes, reasonable cost, selection limited </li></ul><ul><li>Thrift Store: low cost, fit or style haphazard </li></ul><ul><li>You might not get what you want, but you might just get what you need. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Summary <ul><li>YES! OER are a viable option for quick and low cost course development (it takes time to shop) </li></ul><ul><li>OER provide both ready content and ideas for new content development </li></ul><ul><li>Providers need to pay more attention to CC licenses </li></ul><ul><li>Work to be done: quality, models & metadata </li></ul><ul><li>If you can’t find it, you should build it </li></ul><ul><li>and then give it away! </li></ul>
  25. 25. How Free is Free? Building University Courses from Open Educational Resources Griff Richards & Tanya Elias griff@sfu.ca [email_address] ETUG BC, Victoria 07 June 2010

×