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ETUG Fall Workshop 2013: Beyond effectiveness &efficiency

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Presentation by ETUG fall workshop 2013 Keynote: George Veletsianos

Presentation by ETUG fall workshop 2013 Keynote: George Veletsianos

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  • 1. Beyond effectiveness &efficiency Learning that’s good for the soul George Veletsianos, PhD Canada Research Chair Associate Professor School of Education and Technology ETUG Keynote, Victoria, BC, November 2013
  • 2. My research Students’, Instructors’, and Scholars’ experiences and practices with emerging technologies in digital environments (e.g., social networks, open scholarship, open courses/experiences) To improve environments and practices
  • 3. Emerging Technologies •  May or may not be new technologies •  Evolving, “coming into being” •  Go through “hype cycles” •  Not yet fully understood •  Not yet fully researched •  Potentially disruptive (but potential is unfulfilled) (Veletsianos, 2010)
  • 4. “Strong pressures to produce mediocre instructional products based on templates and preexisting content.” Wilson, Parrish, & Veletsianos, 2008
  • 5. Two  Dominant  Narra-ves  
  • 6. Narrative #1 The latest technology as a panacea
  • 7. Narratives #2 Online education = efficient mode of delivery to large numbers of students
  • 8. “Examples of outstanding [online] instruction are hard to find.” Wilson, Parrish, & Veletsianos, 2008
  • 9. Courses can be effective and efficient… But are they: Transformational? Socially just?
  • 10. Truly Open Practices
  • 11. Open Practices •  Faculty use social media to: –  Explore scholarly ideas –  Re-envision their identities as public intellectuals –  Share knowledge –  Debate & critique –  Advice & reflect –  Connect with other researchers –  Reach multiple audiences (Kjellberg, 2010; Kirkup, 2010; Martindale & Wiley, 2005; Mewburn & Thompson, 2013; Veletsianos, 2012)
  • 12. What scholarly activities do individuals enact on social media?
  • 13. What scholarly activities do individuals enact on social media? Announcements Draft papers Open textbooks Syllabi + Activities Live streaming Live-Blogging Collaborative authoring Debates + commentary Open teaching Public P&T materials Crowdsourcing Veletsianos (2013)
  • 14. These acts/activities question academic traditions & the status quo
  • 15. And circumvent systems… PirateUniversity.org ThePaperBay.com Reddit.com/r/Scholar
  • 16. “Places of gathering” and “networks of care and bonding” Veletsianos (2013)
  • 17. #PhDChat
  • 18. Project Engage! http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1138506
  • 19. Sample project
  • 20. Design considerations for powerful learning -  Narrative & Storyline -  Sharing with others -  Design opportunities that allow engagement beyond course activities (interacting with experts/colleagues, authentic contributions) -  Open also means “being vulnerable” and “putting yourself out there”
  • 21. Contrast: The other “open” practices
  • 22. The xMOOC phenomenon as a symptom •  MOOCs are “the billion $$ solution to a problem we haven’t identified yet.” (Siemens, 2013) –  A historically accurate perspective. •  “The history of our field is replete with bandwagons, new technologies that were the temporal panaceas... Bandwagons are solutions in search of problems” (Choi & Reeves, 2013).
  • 23. If the MOOC phenomenon is not a solution, what is it? •  A “symptom of a larger problem” (Marquis, 2013) •  A “symptom of the HE crisis” (Kendzior, 2013) •  A “symptom of the absence of educational ambition among politicians” (Newfield, 2013) •  “A symptom of change” (Stewart, 2013) •  A symptom of “the seismic shifts that are taking place in our profession” (Taylor, 2012) •  A symptom of “society’s degraded approach to knowledge” (Leddy, 2013) •  “One symptom of openness” (Batson, 2013)
  • 24. If the MOOC phenomenon is not a solution, what is it? •  I propose that the MOOC phenomenon is a symptom of pressures, failures, closed ears: –  Economic, political, privatization pressures –  Educators’ failures to create their own solutions to educational problems –  Lack of impact of educational technology research on learning design –  Lack of impact of educational technology scholarship (to share our findings, to make meaningful contributions to practice).
  • 25. If the MOOC phenomenon is not a solution, what is it?
  • 26. Even so, the MOOC phenomenon has made some contributions •  Elevated the profile of online education •  Raised the profile of free (perhaps open?) education •  Elevated the profile of teaching (Collier, 2013) •  Exerted pressure on HE institutions to innovate •  Provided impetus for more collaboration within HE (e.g., at the institutional level)
  • 27. Hence… The MOOC phenomenon
  • 28. What happens “on the ground” with open learning/participation? •  Caveat –  Open courses vs. “Open” courses vs. Open learning/participation •  Learners report –  benefiting from open course participation (Hilton, Graham, Rich, & Wiley, 2010) –  Facing a number of obstacles (Mackness et al, 2011)
  • 29. What happens “on the ground” with open learning/participation? •  Institutional MOOCs demonstrate low completion rates, <10% (Jordan, 2013) •  Big Data & Learning Analytics research question traditional understanding of “completion” –  Learners exhibit varied participation behaviors (e.g., auditing, completing, disengaging, sampling) (Kizilcec, Piech, & Schneider, 2013) –  Koller et al. (2013) argue that participants may not necessarily intent to complete a course
  • 30. What happens “on the ground” with open learning/participation? •  We lack an evidence-based understanding of experiences with all open forms of learning/ scholarship •  Majority of the research on open online learning conducted to date has been survey-based, focused on learner behavior, and guided by tracking online behaviors •  Reports from institutional offices are helpful, but we need in-depth studies
  • 31. What happens “on the ground” with open learning/participation? •  Need multiple methodologies: •  Macro (Kizilcec, Piech, Schneider, 2013) •  Auditing, Completing, Disengaging, Sampling •  Micro (Ota, 2013) •  “[I was] left with a partial sense of accomplishment and feelings of hollowness and incompleteness.” •  In the frenzy surrounding the rise of “edtech” and MOOCs, it seems that student voices and experiences are rarely considered.
  • 32. What is it like to participate in open online learning? Veletsianos, G. (2013). Learner Experiences with MOOCs and Open Online Learning. Hybrid Pedagogy. Retrieved on Sept 29, 2013 from http://learnerexperiences.hybridpedagogy.com.
  • 33. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 34. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 35. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 36. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 37. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 38. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 39. Results •  Learners –  questioned institutional/instructor commitment, –  identified a need for improved instructional design, –  praised responsive MOOC instructors, –  criticized instructors who were not visible, –  valued course flexibility and denounced course rigidity, –  appreciated the opportunities for open learning.
  • 40. To summarize… •  The realities of open online learning are different from the hopes of open online learning. •  We only have small pieces of an incomplete mosaic of students’ learning experiences with open online learning.
  • 41. Where do we go from here? Design experiences, not products Sharing Storylines Vulnerability Design, develop, dream on.
  • 42. Thank you! Download these open access books: http://tinyurl.com/book321 http://learnerexperiences.hybridpedagogy.com
  • 43. Thank you! www.veletsianos.com www.veletsianos.com/publications @veletsianos on Twitter veletsianos@gmail.com