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E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
E-learning: The Promise and the Potential
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E-learning: The Promise and the Potential

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Presentation slides by John Biss and Erin Mills - Shaping Our Future live session

Presentation slides by John Biss and Erin Mills - Shaping Our Future live session

Published in: Education, News & Politics
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    • 1.  
    • 2. Presentation at the Shaping our Future: Toward a Pan-Canadian E-Learning Research Agenda May 20 th 2008 The Promise and the Potential
    • 3. Learning To do To know To be To live together Delors’ Four Pillars of Learning
    • 4. Definition of E-learning <ul><li>The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) defines e-learning as the : </li></ul><ul><li>“ development of knowledge and skills through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) </li></ul><ul><li>particularly to support interactions for learning—interactions with content, with learning activities and tools, and with other people”. [1] </li></ul><ul><li>[1] J. Rossiter, 2002; also 2005 in an address at the CCL Workshop on e-learning </li></ul>
    • 5. <ul><li>To present an overview of the scope and complexity and capability of e-learning, nationally and internationally </li></ul><ul><li>2. To review the current state of policy related to </li></ul><ul><li>e-learning in Canada </li></ul><ul><li>3. To outline what challenges need to be addressed to position e-learning as a significant agent in the advancement of current public policy priorities </li></ul>Objectives of the report
    • 6. Policy Dimensions of E-Learning CULTURE / CONFIDENCE CONNECTIONS / ACCESS CONTENT CONTENT LEARNERS LEARNERS PRACTITIONERS PRACTITIONERS USERS USERS PROVIDERS PROVIDERS POLICY MAKERS POLICY MAKERS Formal Formal ( ( credentialized credentialized ) ) Non Non - - formal formal (non (non - - credentialized credentialized ) ) Experiential Experiential ‘ ‘ Self Self - - directed directed ’ ’ Teachers, learning technologists, Teachers, learning technologists, instructional designers, counsellors instructional designers, counsellors Education Education And Training And Training Business Business Industry/ Industry/ Government Government Community Community and Culture and Culture Governments Governments Community Community Industry Industry Private Private Public Public
    • 7. <ul><li>The report builds on work undertaken by CCL and the CMEC. </li></ul><ul><li>Studies sponsored by CCL were carried out by Rossiter (2006), Abrami et al (2006), Fournier (2006) and Charpentier et al (2006). </li></ul><ul><li>Expert Panel (2006) </li></ul>Background
    • 8. <ul><li>Three Elements: </li></ul><ul><li>National/International Literature Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis of findings from existing CCL studies and initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>3. Survey of Current Policies </li></ul>Scope of the report
    • 9. Policy Survey Methodology <ul><li>A total of 183 publicly available e-learning documents were located. </li></ul><ul><li>106 documents were reviewed using prescriptive and emergent coding techniques. </li></ul><ul><li>A series of interviews (32 in total) were conducted with policy makers, industry sector practitioners, experts and employers. </li></ul>
    • 10. Literature Survey <ul><li>National </li></ul><ul><li>Canada pioneered building a national infrastructure and undertaking many exemplary initiatives in the 1990s. </li></ul><ul><li>Canada has developed the technical capacity of ICTs. </li></ul><ul><li>ICTs could play a significant role in achieving public policy priorities. </li></ul>
    • 11. Literature review (cont’d) <ul><li>National </li></ul><ul><li>ICTs need to be seen as an integral element in the policy development and implementation process. </li></ul><ul><li>ICTs seen simply as an educational tool marginalizes their potential contribution. </li></ul><ul><li>Canada’s strong education sector and well-educated population consistently gives Canada a top ranking in terms of e-learning and e-economic readiness. </li></ul>
    • 12. Literature Review (Cont’d) <ul><li>National </li></ul><ul><li>Many of the essential elements are in place to support e-learning. </li></ul><ul><li>There appears to be a lack of understanding amongst policy makers regarding the potential contribution e-learning could make. </li></ul>
    • 13. Literature Survey (Cont’d) <ul><li>International </li></ul><ul><li>A growing number of nations recognize the role that e-learning can play in sustaining their economic, social and cultural development </li></ul><ul><li>Support the effective use of ICTs in support of learning as a strategic national priority </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize that the ubiquitous nature of ICTs make it critical that citizens know how to use them effectively </li></ul>
    • 14. Overarching Observations from the Literature <ul><li>Shift of focus and emphasis away from technology and more on users and learning approaches. </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition of learning as a social/collaborative process involving interaction between users, the content with guidance from facilitators. </li></ul>
    • 15. Observations (cont’d) <ul><li>E-Learning viewed more in terms of ‘Knowledge construction’ not simply ‘Knowledge transfer’. </li></ul><ul><li>Shift from concerns regarding ‘access’ to ‘impacts’. </li></ul><ul><li>Growing support to develop understandings based on research that can guide </li></ul><ul><li>policy formation. </li></ul>
    • 16. Earlier Work: Key Observations/Synthesis <ul><li>Canada is starting to trail behind other countries. (Charpentier et al, Expert Panel) </li></ul><ul><li>E-learning is a fundamental tool for lifelong learning. (Rossiter, Fournier, Charpentier) </li></ul><ul><li>E-Learning can be adaptable to the diversity of learning needs and styles of learning. (Fournier, Expert Panel) </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of a National Strategy (Rossiter, Charpentier et al) </li></ul>
    • 17. Key Observations/Synthesis (Cont’d) <ul><li>Need for multi-jurisdictional cooperation and collaboration (CMEC, Expert Panel) </li></ul><ul><li>Need for relevant empirical and longitudinal research (Rossiter, Abrami et al) </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of a portrait of e-Learning in provincial and Federal policies in Canada (Charpentier) </li></ul><ul><li>Need for mechanisms to disseminate research to policy makers and practitioners (Rossiter) </li></ul>
    • 18. Key Observations/Synthesis (Cont’d) <ul><li>Need for a coordinating body that respects the province’s authority and responsibilities for education (Charpentier) </li></ul><ul><li>Need to address organizational change issues as e-learning is incorporated into traditional practice (Rossiter) </li></ul><ul><li>E-Learning needs to be user/learner-centered and results driven (Expert Panel) </li></ul>
    • 19. Findings <ul><li>Policy Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Policy makers view the benefits of e-learning primarily in terms of: flexibility/accessibility, meeting social demand, interactivity/communication and learner achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of attention to using e-learning to teach basic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Attention to connectivity to remote learners </li></ul>
    • 20. Findings (Cont’d) <ul><li>Policy Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Types of learners (special needs, gifted, aboriginal) were addressed only minimally </li></ul><ul><li>Support for implementation - professional development, web-based resources and logistics support received a great deal of attention </li></ul><ul><li>Use of research to support implementation was limited </li></ul>
    • 21. Findings (cont’d) <ul><li>Policy Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Intra-jurisdictional cooperation amongst providers was emphasised </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal attention paid to collaboration among provinces and at the federal level </li></ul><ul><li>Little attention paid to regulation </li></ul>
    • 22. Findings (Cont’d) <ul><li>Policy Survey (Cont’d) </li></ul><ul><li>There appears to be little systematic data being gathered on users and non users </li></ul><ul><li>E-learning is just beginning to be seen in strategic terms within institutions </li></ul>
    • 23. Findings (Cont’d) <ul><li>Interviews emphasized the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Increased collaboration, sharing resources and effective partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Avoiding the limits of jurisdictional boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>Long term and sustainable funding </li></ul>
    • 24. Findings(Cont’d) <ul><li>Interviews (Cont’d) </li></ul><ul><li>Development of e-learning standards </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership to manage efforts and costs </li></ul><ul><li>A dissemination plan to share information and research </li></ul>
    • 25. Pathways Worth Exploring <ul><li>Developing a common framework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulating a shared vision </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nurturing shared leadership focused on creating mechanisms for effective policy and program coordination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establishing partnerships between government, institutions, private sector and community groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development of a joint action plan </li></ul></ul>
    • 26. Pathways Worth Exploring <ul><li>Forum on E-learning </li></ul><ul><li>Representatives from educational institutions, governments, business and industry and community based organizations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Responsible for articulating vision statement, liaising with stakeholders and creating knowledge exchange opportunities </li></ul></ul>
    • 27. <ul><li>Development of a data strategy and clearinghouse with a focus on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Synthesizing existing research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generating new evidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing high quality evidence as a basis for action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fostering knowledge exchange </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying core questions/issues </li></ul></ul>Pathways worth Exploring (cont’d)
    • 28. Discussion Questions <ul><li>What challenges are seen to advancing along the pathways being proposed? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there means available using ICTs that could assist in moving along these pathways? </li></ul><ul><li>In moving forward where would you begin? </li></ul>

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