Creating Space for
Collaborative Leadership
Brian Case – Manager, Infrastructure Services
Denise Goudy – Client Services M...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Agenda
•

Levels of Collaboration

•

Collaborative Programs, Services & Proj...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Levels of Collaboration
•

the realm of collaboration

•

drivers of collabor...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Realm of Collaboration
Post-Secondary System
Institution C
Institution B

Ins...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Drivers of Collaboration
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Cost reduction
Establishing relatio...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Degrees of Collaboration
Achieving a Common Purpose and Mutual Benefit
High

...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Process for Collaboration
Shared Services

 
 

BCcampus | connect. collabora...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Process for Collaboration
Collaborative Programs, Services, Projects

 
 

BC...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Collaboration Success Factors

6 key aspects to collaboration formation
• For...
Creating Space for
Collaborative Leadership

Collaborative Programs, Services and
Projects
Denise Goudy

BCcampus | connec...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Collaborative Programs
Applied Business Technology
Northern Collaborative for...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Collaborative Services
Services
• AskAway
• WriteAway (e-tutoring)
• Moodle (...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Collaborative Projects
Current Projects in 2013/14
•Health Care Assistant
•El...
Creating Space for
Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Ian MacKinnon

BCcampus | connect. collabora...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Connector transactions
•

GetCourses – Cours...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Current Architecture
Mule Enterprise Service...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Current Architecture

BCcampus | connect. co...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Future Direction
ESB vs. Web Services
•

Mul...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Move to VM architecture
•Retire agent boxes ...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Connector System – Data Exchange
Standards-based data descriptions
•

Retire ...
Creating Space for
Collaborative Leadership

Transcript Exchange
Cathy van Soest

BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovat...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Transcript Exchange

TranscriptsBC: Serving BC Citizens

Goal

BCcampus | con...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Transcript Exchange
Getting There

Collaborative leadership
and the
BCcampus ...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Transcript Exchange
Collaborative Leadership Examples

BCcampus | connect. co...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Transcript Exchange
Phase 1: 2010-13

BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innova...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Transcript Exchange
Phase 2

Implementation & On-going Operational Plan in De...
Creating Space for
Collaborative Leadership

Enabling Infrastructure
Brian Case

BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Infrastructure
Our Relationship with SFU
•

PASBC and WebCT in 2004

•

Conne...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Infrastructure
Benefits
•

Purchasing Power

•

Access to skilled staff
•
•

...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Infrastructure

BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate.

Page | 30
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Infrastructure
Flexible Delivery Models
•

Adobe Connect – Share everything
•...
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Summary:
BCcampus can provide the environment and the opportunity for
collabo...
Creating Space for
Collaborative Leadership

Questions?

BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate.

Page | 33
Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

Contact us
Brian Case
Manager, Infrastructure Services
bcase@bccampus.ca

Den...
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Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

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A group effort, this presentation by several BCcampus staff was made to the IT4BC Conference in June 2013,

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  • “Collaboration” is a term that’s often used yet means many different things in many different contexts. Yet, a fundamental cause of failed collaborative projects or partnerships is a lack of understanding of:
    collaboration itself and
    the process of collaboration.
    To demonstrate collaborative leadership, collaborative innovation, or even simply collaboration firstly requires a better understanding of collaboration, and models and processes of collaboration.
    For this presentation, we’ll quickly look at:
    the realm of collaboration
    drivers of collaboration
    degrees of collaboration
    barriers to collaboration
    a process for collaboration
    success factors
    and finally examples of collaboration that leads to systemic technology solutions
  • The Realm of Collaboration:
    Most collaboration is considered to occur in an immediate way – your needs, the solutions for your needs, needs of the people you work with, your department, etc. It’s not a selfish perspective – it’s the realm of immediacy.
    Sometimes an institutional service group needs to be involved though to help you with your immediate needs, e.g. IT Services and so the collaboration is between you, or your department (a vertical) and a service provider (horizontal) of your organization.
    More often though, there are drivers that necessitate a broader solution, or there really is better efficiency for a collaborative solution when it extends across the horizontal of the whole organization, e.g., Institution A. This is the realm where many consider that collaboration that they are involved in exists, and where many see collaborative solutions to exist.
    But what about inter-institutional collaborations, when two or more institutions need to collaborate to address an issue with a common solution? Or what about systemic collaboration, when a systemic issue needs to be addressed with a systemic solution? This is the realm that systemic groups or agencies such as BCcampus, BCCAT, HEITBC, etc. see.
    System collaborations or collaborative services may not be easily developed though. In some cases such collaborative initiatives may be led by:
    an individual institution of the collaborative group – but may involve issues of time, resources, perceived conflict of interest
    a consortium of institutions who have formed a collaboration – but may involve issues of coordination, governance, decision making
    a vendor or other third party – but may involve issues of cost
    Collaboration can also be led and facilitated by a sponsor organization acting as a collaborative agent – a system-wide group acting as a neutral third party as convener, catalyst, and capacity builder for the collaborative initiative.
    Key point: When individual institutions approach horizontal collaboration they need to extend from their immediate realm to the multi-organizational or perhaps even systemic realm.
  • Many public agencies are increasingly asked to engage in, need to engage in, or are engaging in collaborative ventures outside their realm of immediacy – these collaborations are ‘cross-boundary’ or ‘horizontal’ partnerships and collaborations.
    Horizontal collaboration usually refers to “an initiative involving a number of organizations, departments or government agencies or ministries that must address issues requiring the crossing of jurisdictional boundaries to develop solutions”. (Facilitating Health and Education Sector Collaboration in Support of Comprehensive School Health. Pan Canadian Joint Consortium for School Health. Canadian Public Health Association. 2010) Available online: http://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph/article/view/1912)
    There are many drivers that may necessitate a cross-boundary collaborative approach such as:
    Cost reduction
    Establishing relationships
    Increased or better services
    Streamlined processes
    Leveraging enterprise solutions
    Leveraging mutual resources
    Lowering administrative costs
    Information sharing
  • Change strategies are difficult enough within an organization and require a common vision and purpose to succeed.
    Horizontal collaborations in a multi-organizational or systemic realm require organizations to work together as a coalition with common purpose. This coalition is usually referred to as a partnership or a collaborative.
    There is actually a continuum of coalition strategies when multiple organizations work together – there are typically five that are listed:
    networking – exchange of information for mutual benefit
    valuable and informative, but often lacks outcomes
    coordinating - exchanging information for mutual benefit, and altering activities accordingly to achieve a common purpose
    cooperating - exchanging information for mutual benefit, altering activities and sharing resources accordingly to achieve a common purpose
    collaborating - exchanging information for mutual benefit, altering activities and sharing resources accordingly, and enhancing the capacity of another organization to achieve a common purpose
    integrating – when the coalition creates its own structure to manage its activities
    ________________________________
    Collaboration is not an easy process.
    Note that as the degree of collaboration increases, the barriers to effective collaboration increase - three powerful and common barriers impede collaborative efforts. Success or failure is determined by the interaction of these three dynamic forces: Time, Trust and Turf
    Time: It takes time and effort to develop a working partnership.
    Sometimes it might be faster to complete a task without relying on partners to participate and contribute, but in the long run, collaboration can result in better, longer-lasting outcomes.
    Trust: Effective collaborations require trust among partners. Trust in others enables partners to share benefits and resources and to take on challenges.
    Turf: Collaboration works only when all partners both contribute to and benefit from the effort.
    When partners perceive an imbalance, imagined or real, tied to the benefits of the collaboration, the process of working together might stall, or the partner who feels disadvantaged might leave the collaborative. 
    Also, relationships and processes move from informal to very formal.
    From: Community Collaboration. Available online: http://www.actforyouth.net/youth_development/communities/collaboration.cfm
    Adapted from: Health Syst Lead. 1996 Dec;3(10):13-6. Collaboration and the three Ts: time, trust and turf constraints. Himmelman AT.
  • BCcampus has developed a business process for collaborative shared services. The BCcampus shared service model has been adopted to develop, implement and operate innovative business and sourcing models for systemic, scalable, sustainable (s3) shared services.
     
    An educational shared service is a function, process, or activity performed by a provider organization on behalf of and in support of two or more user organizations. BCcampus facilitates several distinctive models which tend to build from a multi-institutional system model.
     
    More specifically, goals of educational technology and applications services are to:
    optimize the benefits of educational technology applications and significantly reduce costs of hosting and service delivery
    maximize institutional access to educational technologies while minimizing redundancy
    enable secure exchange of institutional student information system (SIS) data to support delivery of programs and courses
    research and pilot new and innovative educational technologies
    complement collaborative and partnership program arrangements between institutions
    Examples: Moodle, Adobe Connect, Kaltura, etc.
  • Similarly, BCcampus provides support for online collaborative programs, learning services and collaborative projects.
     
    The BCcampus collaborative service model has been adopted to develop, implement and operate such collaborative endeavours in an integrative planning process by acting as a catalyst, convener and capacity-builder (c3) for multi-institutional and/or multi-stakeholder collaborations.
     
    Goals once again are top respond to challenges within the higher education system and to take a leadership role to:
    provide improved access and flexibility to off-campus students
    provide collaborative programs and services that a single institution may not be able to
    significantly reduce costs of service delivery
    maximize institutional access to programs and services while minimizing redundancy
    enable secure exchange of institutional student information system (SIS) data to support delivery of programs and services
    develop systemic collaborative and partnership program arrangements between institutions
    convene and facilitate the process of collaboration on behalf of the stakeholder groups
  • There are 6 key aspects to collaboration formation
    Forging initial agreements
    Building leadership
    Building legitimacy
    Building trust
    Managing conflict
    Planning 
    From Bryson, J., Crosby, B., Stone, M. The Design and Implementation of Cross-Sector Collaborations: Propositions from the Literature. Public Administration Review, December, 2006.
  • Moodle:
    11 participating institutions
    1 BCcampus hosting
    1 Application support by Lambda Solutions
     knowledge, expertise and application support
    Kaltura:
    5 participating institutions
    1 large system partner hosting
    $ more affordable for smaller institutions
     knowledge, expertise and application support
  • Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership

    1. 1. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Brian Case – Manager, Infrastructure Services Denise Goudy – Client Services Manager Ian MacKinnon – Client Services Manager Cathy van Soest – Client Services Manager Lawrence Parisotto – Director, Collaborative Programs and Shared Services Initiatives Thursday, November 14, 2013
    2. 2. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Agenda • Levels of Collaboration • Collaborative Programs, Services & Projects • Connector System – Data Exchange • Transcript Exchange • BCcampus Infrastructure • Summary • Questions BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 2
    3. 3. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Levels of Collaboration • the realm of collaboration • drivers of collaboration • degrees of collaboration • barriers to collaboration • a process for collaboration • success factors • and finally examples of collaboration that leads to systemic technology solutions BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 3
    4. 4. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Realm of Collaboration Post-Secondary System Institution C Institution B Institution A Service BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page |
    5. 5. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Drivers of Collaboration • • • • • • • • Cost reduction Establishing relationships Increased or better services Streamlined processes Leveraging enterprise solutions Leveraging mutual resources Lowering administrative costs Information sharing Getting Started in Cross-Boundary Collaboration: What State CIOs Need to Know. NASCIO. 2007 BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 5
    6. 6. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Degrees of Collaboration Achieving a Common Purpose and Mutual Benefit High Low Adapted from: Collaboration for a Change: Definitions, Decision-making Models, Roles, and Collaboration Process Guide. Himmelman, AT. 2002 BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page |
    7. 7. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Process for Collaboration Shared Services     BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 7
    8. 8. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Process for Collaboration Collaborative Programs, Services, Projects     BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 8
    9. 9. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Collaboration Success Factors 6 key aspects to collaboration formation • Forging initial agreements • Building leadership • Building legitimacy • Building trust • Managing conflict • Planning  BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 9
    10. 10. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Collaborative Programs, Services and Projects Denise Goudy BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 10
    11. 11. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Collaborative Programs Applied Business Technology Northern Collaborative for Information Technology BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 11
    12. 12. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Collaborative Services Services • AskAway • WriteAway (e-tutoring) • Moodle (LMS) • Kaltura (Video Enterprise System) BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 12
    13. 13. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Collaborative Projects Current Projects in 2013/14 •Health Care Assistant •Elder Abuse Prevention Strategy •Care Management Competencies •Interior Health Authority/Colleges BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 13
    14. 14. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Ian MacKinnon BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 14
    15. 15. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Connector transactions • GetCourses – CoursesBC • GetCourses – CoursesBC • GetAcademicRecord – MyCreditsBC • ValidateStudent – Collaborative ABT / MyCreditsBC ApplyBC • Full Service Institutions Transcript Exchange • Transcript Batches – Receive / Deliver Future Development BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 15
    16. 16. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Current Architecture Mule Enterprise Service Bus • Hub (formerly “Capitol”) • Agents (formerly “Embassies”) • MuleMQ – handles message queuing using Java-based JMIS queue Transcript Exchange • Introduction of Web Services to connector system BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 16
    17. 17. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Current Architecture BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 17
    18. 18. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Future Direction ESB vs. Web Services • MuleMQ no longer well supported WebServices have conquered the world: • Banking, Stock trades, Governments, etc. • Better security model BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 18
    19. 19. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Move to VM architecture •Retire agent boxes – most near end of service life •Propose to have institutions provision a VM for BCcampus connector •Clear responsibility lines through web service contracts •Web service security to replace home-grown system BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 19
    20. 20. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Connector System – Data Exchange Standards-based data descriptions • Retire home-grown schemas • PESC Admissions Application – in progress • PESC College Transcript – in progress Future data exchange services • High School Transcripts BCcampus role in connector system • Web Service deployable modules • BCcampus to become more a resource than a software developer • • • Example containers Sourceforge public projects Crowdsourcing BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 20
    21. 21. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Transcript Exchange Cathy van Soest BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 21
    22. 22. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Transcript Exchange TranscriptsBC: Serving BC Citizens Goal BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Single Service for Transcript Ordering Page | 22
    23. 23. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Transcript Exchange Getting There Collaborative leadership and the BCcampus Connector BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 23
    24. 24. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Transcript Exchange Collaborative Leadership Examples BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 24
    25. 25. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Transcript Exchange Phase 1: 2010-13 BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 25
    26. 26. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Transcript Exchange Phase 2 Implementation & On-going Operational Plan in Development Focus: Secure PDF Transcript Delivery BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 26
    27. 27. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Enabling Infrastructure Brian Case BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 27
    28. 28. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Infrastructure Our Relationship with SFU • PASBC and WebCT in 2004 • Connector project 2005 • VMware in 2009 • Moved to SFU ESX Cluster in 2012 BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 28
    29. 29. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Infrastructure Benefits • Purchasing Power • Access to skilled staff • • • Developers DBA’s BCNET • Secure Data Centre Next Slide: Infrastructure overview BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 29
    30. 30. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Infrastructure BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 30
    31. 31. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Infrastructure Flexible Delivery Models • Adobe Connect – Share everything • • • • Licenses Server and Network Support Moodle • • Dedicated VM’s D2L • Vendor hosted BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 31
    32. 32. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Summary: BCcampus can provide the environment and the opportunity for collaborative leadership The range of opportunities is endless with a proven infrastructure, collaborative programs, services and projects Collaborative leadership can occur at the individual level, the institutional level, or across partners in a facilitated environment. Where can collaboration take you? As an IT leader in BC’s postsecondary system? BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 32
    33. 33. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Questions? BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 33
    34. 34. Creating Space for Collaborative Leadership Contact us Brian Case Manager, Infrastructure Services bcase@bccampus.ca Denise Goudy Client Services Manager Collaborative Programs and Services dgoudy@bccampus.ca Ian MacKinnon Client Services Manager ApplyBC, Moodle, Connector imackinnon@bccampus.ca Cathy van Soest Client Services Manager TranscriptsBC, CoursesBC, MyCreditsBC cvansoest@bccampus.ca BCcampus | connect. collaborate. innovate. Page | 34
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