BRAINCHILD STUDIOS/NYC
This portfolio showcases our work for
the clients highlighted below.
c l i e n t l i s t
DC Comics
Graphitti Designs
Tachy...
DC COMICS
vDC Comics I Comic-Con International I Vertigo Crime I ??????
DC COMICS BRAND: A GRAPHIC HISTORY
DC Comics traces its heri...
DC Comics	 7
+ CRIME =
8	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 9
The packaging for the Ame-Comi Heroine Series, initially created for Batgirl
and Cat...
10	 DC Comics
The final Vertigo Crime brand mark along with “Chuck Chalk”.
Additional concept sketches can be seen on the ...
12 	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 13
The Vertigo Crime line hit stores in August 2009 with the release of Filthy Rich and
Dark E...
14	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 15
16	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 17
18	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 19
20	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 21
22	 DC Comics
6 THE NEW BARDS: An Introduction by Elliot S. Maggin
10 CHAPTER ONE: Strange Visitor
58 CHAPTER TWO: Truth a...
6 THE NEW BARDS: An Introduction by Elliot S. Maggin
10 CHAPTER ONE: Strange Visitor
58 CHAPTER TWO: Truth and Justice
110...
26	 DC Comics 	 DC Comics	 27
DC Comics	 29
HARD WIRED FOR YOUR BRAND
30 million readers get into comics every month
PLUGGED IN TO POPULAR CULTURE
Comic...
Batman Begins 400
Concept sketches along with the final paint scheme (above) for
the Batman Begins 400 event car. It was l...
32	 DC Comics
DEAR EDUCATOR,
You strive to make each day
a journey of discovery for your students with new subjects, ideas...
WE STAND
UP TO A
CHALLENGE!
WE STAND
UP TO A
CHALLENGE!
5’ 0”
4’ 11”
4’ 10”
4’ 9”
4’ 8”
4’ 7”
4’ 6”
4’ 5”
4’ 4”
4’ 3”
4’ 2...
KRYPTO IS
SPECIAL, SMART, BRAVE
AND STRONG!
Catch
on Cartoon Network,
Monday-Friday
at 2:30 p.m. E/P.
KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG ...
ENIGMA BOOKS
38	 Comic-Con International
Comic-Con Event Shirts
Designed by Brainchild Studios
and produced through Graphi...
40	 Enigma Books 	 Enigma Books	 41
42	 Enigma Books 	 Enigma Books	 43
44	 Enigma Books 	 Enigma Books	 45
46	 Enigma Books 	 Enigma Books	 47
48	 Enigma Books 	 Enigma Books	 49
50 	 Enigma Books 	 Enigma Books	 51
Brainchild Studios/NYC
330 West 38th Street, Suite 1503, New York, New York, 10018 p: 212.647.9278 e: info@brainchildstudi...
es to Staten Island. That “forgotten borough” is one of the most frequently requested locations I am asked
n, when people ...
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Brainchild Studios Portfolio Sampler

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A 52-page portfolio book showcasing a sample of the work designed for clients, DC Comics, Young Minds Inspired, Enigma Books and Comic-Con International.

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Brainchild Studios Portfolio Sampler

  1. 1. BRAINCHILD STUDIOS/NYC
  2. 2. This portfolio showcases our work for the clients highlighted below. c l i e n t l i s t DC Comics Graphitti Designs Tachyon Publications Young Minds Inspired Carpenter’s Union—Local 1536 Summerstreet Press Comic-Con International Public Interest Media Group Enigma Books Language Publications Interactive Charlton House Pfizer The Kaplan Thaler Group Brainchild Studios/NYC 330 West 38th Street, Suite 1503, New York, New York, 10018 p: 212.647.9278 e: info@brainchildstudiosnyc.com w: brainchildstudiosnyc.com
  3. 3. DC COMICS
  4. 4. vDC Comics I Comic-Con International I Vertigo Crime I ?????? DC COMICS BRAND: A GRAPHIC HISTORY DC Comics traces its heritage back to NEW FUN COMICS in 1935 but did not begin branding itself until its 1940 publications. Presented in a simple circle, DC’s initial mark on the comics read “A DC Publication.” The “DC” referred to DETECTIVE COMICS, one of the oldest and most popular titles published at the time. With Superman’s phenomenal success in the early 1940’s, and to enhance potential sales of the other titles in the line, DC changed its mark to read “A Superman DC Publication” with late 1941 releases. By 1949, the various businesses that made up DC Comics were formalized into National Comics, Inc., which was reflected in the logo’s new design that read “Superman–National Comics”. By 1970, DC made an attempt to capitalize further on the sales success of character–driven titles. The previous NATIONAL mark was retired, replaced with an image of the host title’s character in a circle and a simple “DC” and title identification. Then, in 1972, a simple white circle with bold DC initials was introduced. The company then modified the logo again in early 1974 to read “The Line of DC Super-Stars.” From late 1975 through most of 1976, the logo was moved to the center of the cover, anchoring a bar of information above the logo. It then moved back to the left corner. In early 1976, a redesigned DC logo (referred to as the “Bullet”) was created by noted graphic designer Milton Glaser. It employed evolving elements of the past, while establishing a fresh interpretation for the times. This “Bullet” was used up until 2005, becoming the single longest- running logo in the company’s history. The current DC logo (referred to as the “Spin”), created by Josh Beatman of Brainchild Studios/NYC, continues the evolution of the mark. Reflecting DC’s expansion from comics publisher into larger forums for entertainment, the DC logo echoes the company’s new momentum forward, while still acknowledging DC’s rich history and the mark’s visual legacy. THE DC “SPIN” FEATURED in Logolounge 5 Logolounge 5, Rockport Publisher’s best-selling hardcover series, collects 2,000 award-winning logotypes selected by an international panel of judges from a pool of over 33,000 entries. DC Comics 5 DC Comic’s current brand mark, the DC “Spin”, introduced in the summer of 2005.
  5. 5. DC Comics 7
  6. 6. + CRIME = 8 DC Comics DC Comics 9 The packaging for the Ame-Comi Heroine Series, initially created for Batgirl and Catwoman, has since been expanded to include a total of 29 different PVC statues through 2011.
  7. 7. 10 DC Comics The final Vertigo Crime brand mark along with “Chuck Chalk”. Additional concept sketches can be seen on the following page. CRIME CRIME
  8. 8. 12 DC Comics DC Comics 13 The Vertigo Crime line hit stores in August 2009 with the release of Filthy Rich and Dark Entries. Additional titles followed with an extensive line-up planned through 2010.
  9. 9. 14 DC Comics DC Comics 15
  10. 10. 16 DC Comics DC Comics 17
  11. 11. 18 DC Comics DC Comics 19
  12. 12. 20 DC Comics DC Comics 21
  13. 13. 22 DC Comics 6 THE NEW BARDS: An Introduction by Elliot S. Maggin 10 CHAPTER ONE: Strange Visitor 58 CHAPTER TWO: Truth and Justice 110 CHAPTER THREE: Up in the Sky 158 CHAPTER FOUR: Never-Ending Battle 206 EPILOGUE: One Year Later… 216 MEMORIAL: Keys to Original Covers 218 FROM HERE TO KINGDOM COME: Mysteries Unveiled, Secrets Revealed by Mark Waid 222 ICONS OF VIRTUE by Alex Ross 223 SKETCHBOOK: Norman McCay 224 The Spectre 225 The League 241 A Silent Cavalry 259 Titans 267 Wild Cards 277 A New Breed 293 GENESIS: Developmental Art by Alex Ross 301 KEYS TO THE KINGDOM: An Annotated Guide 307 GALLERY 326 EVOLUTION: The Development of the Orion Pages 328 TESTAMENTS: A Checklist of Kingdom Come Appearances 334 DC DIRECT GALLERY 336 GENERATIONS: A Kingdom Come Genealogy 338 CURTAIN CALL: The Kingdom Come Cast 339 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS & BIOGRAPHIES 340 WITNESS TO THE END by Clark Norman Ross TABLE OF CONTENTS the meta- human race. It is the source of conflict throughout the story. And the story’s synthesis is the realization that this distinction is false. As clearly as another hero, Mahatma Gandhi, asserted that he is a Hindu as well as a Muslim — as well as a Christian, a Jew or a Buddhist if that becomes appropriate — so do we learn here that the most ordinary among us are heroes, and the most colorful and vivid among us are quite ordinary and flawed. It is a conclusion to which our new bards lead us as elegantly and precisely as Socrates led us through an argument or Pythagoras led us through a geometric proof. Even super-heroes need to grow. We know that now. When you read KINGDOM COME, you will too. If we were to peek in on the lives of the people of the Earth in generations to come, surely we would think we were gazing upon Olympus. And of course, again, we would be wrong. They are our children, our grand- children and our successors who will surely stride the Earth as titans in those days, wearing our own features and our own shortcomings. They are our messengers to that resplendent future. And they will bring with them into their time whatever values and iconography that we have to offer them today. Here in the pages that follow is an admirable start.To cite the sentiment of another old friend whom I miss (And if you travel west anytime, Alan, come find me, will you?):This is an imaginary story…aren’t they all? — Elliot S! Maggin Where the Wind Hits Heavy New Year’s,1997 IF WE WERE TO PEEK IN ON THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE OF THE EARTH IN GENERATIONS TO COME, SURELY WE WOULD THINK WE WERE GAZING UPON OLYMPUS. 21A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Each page of KINGDOM COME went through various stages of production and development. The first stage (not pictured here) was the preliminary outline. This summarized an entire sequence from the story. Consulting with the editors, Dan Raspler and Peter Tomasi, Mark then wrote a detailed script which paced the story by breaking down the contents of each page. The dialogue and the setup for each and every panel were presented in text for Alex to then visually represent. Before producing full-size artwork, Alex drew small thumbnail roughs which allowed him to work out compositional problems. This provided an opportunity for all involved to check the pacing of the story prior to producing the actual finished art. Once all notes, modifications, and approvals were received, the thumbnail images were transferred onto oversize boards that eventually became the finished artwork. Copies of the pencilled art were made in order for Peter Tomasi to map out the placement of the word balloons. (Note the differences between the script and the art, which necessitated a reorganization of the placement of the word balloons within the various panels.) The balloon placements were then sent to Todd Klein, the letterer, so he could create and letter the word balloons from the script. In most cases, lettering is done directly on the art board. For KINGDOM COME, as with most painted books, the finished lettering was placed on acetate overlays. Alex then rendered the images with gouache paints. First, he did a mono- chromatic black & white stage to fully detail all the forms, and then he transparently layered over the color . Some opaque painting and air- brushed lighting effects were also used. The letter- ing and painted art were then combined and sent to the separator to produce the finished comic page.PENCIL ARTWORK (actual size:11 1/8”x 17 1/2”) THUMBNAIL ROUGH (actual size: 3 1/8”x 4 15/16”) An example of one of the many photo references used by the artist. FINISHED PAINTED ART (the finished version of this page can be found on page 105) DAN DIDIO Senior VP-Executive Editor DAN RASPLER Editor-original miniseries PETER J.TOMASI Assistant Editor-original miniseries ANTON KAWASAKI Editor-collected edition ROBBIN BROSTERMAN Senior Art Director PAUL LEVITZ President & Publisher GEORG BREWER VP-Design & DC Direct Creative RICHARD BRUNING Senior VP-Creative Director PATRICK CALDON Executive VP-Finance & Operations CHRIS CARAMALIS VP-Finance JOHN CUNNINGHAM VP-Marketing TERRI CUNNINGHAM VP-Managing Editor STEPHANIE FIERMAN Senior VP-Sales & Marketing ALISON GILL VP-Manufacturing RICH JOHNSON VP-Book Trade Sales HANK KANALZ VP-General Manager,WildStorm LILLIAN LASERSON Senior VP & General Counsel JIM LEE Editorial Director-WildStorm PAULA LOWITT Senior VP-Business & Legal Affairs DAVID MCKILLIPS VP-Advertising & Custom Publishing JOHN NEE VP-Business Development GREGORY NOVECK Senior VP-Creative Affairs CHERYL RUBIN Senior VP-Brand Management JEFF TROJAN VP-Business Development, DC Direct BOB WAYNE VP-Sales Published by DC Comics. Cover, introductions and compilation copyright © 2006 DC Comics. All Rights Reserved. Originally published in single magazine form in KINGDOM COME #1-4. Copyright © 1996 DC Comics. All Rights Reserved. All characters, their distinctive likenesses and related elements featured in this publication are trademarks of DC Comics. The stories, characters and incidents featured in this publication are entirely fictional. DC Comics does not read or accept unsolicited submissions of ideas, stories or artwork. DC Comics, 1700 Broadway, New York, NY 10019 A Warner Bros. Entertainment Company Printed in China. First Printing ISBN: 1-4012-0768-5. ISBN 13: 978-1-4012-0768-7. Slipcase and cover art by Alex Ross. KINGDOM COME font created by Alex Ross & Todd Klein. Publication design by Brainchild Studios/NYC. In Elseworlds, heros are taken from their usual settings and put into strange times and places — some that have existed or might have existed, and others that can’t, couldn’t or shouldn’t exist. 8 A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Bard and I had maybe a dozen little germs of ideas packed under my scalp. I’d try this one on him. I’d toss him that one. I’d pitch him another one. Some of them he liked; some of them he didn’t. Some of them inspired ideas of the Bard’s own; some of them made him snort or snore. By the end of a couple of hours — they were a loud, intense cou- ple of hours, as hours I spent with the Bard of Bards always would be — I was emotionally exhausted and still he wanted to hear more. So I dredged up this idea about what might happen if the Guardians came calling on Superman with the tiniest little criticism of how he was going about his job. Now you’re talking resh stuff, the old man let me know. He got excited. He yanked people in the from the hall and made me repeat the idea for them. I called the story “Must There Be a Superman?”and Saint Curt and Murphy drew it and it made me happy and I put the words in Superman’s mouth pretty much steadily for the next fifteen years and never went to law school. And I swear I did not have a clue where the idea had come from. Who knows where ideas come from anyway? I didn’t remember — still don’t remem- ber, in fact, but I believe Jeph — until Jeph told me about his con- tribution years later. Like twenty or so years later. Jeph has never suffered, I don’t believe, for my inconsiderable oversight, and in fact has always been my friend. He’s done well, too. With his buddy Matthew he wrote the first great super-hero movie of the modern period, Commando with Arnold Schwarzenegger, and lots of other great stuff. And one day later on I was editor of Jeph’s first comic-book series of his own, an eight-issue masterpiece with Tim Sale called CHALLENGERS OF THE UNKNOWN. Now he writes for Hollywood and he writes for DC and Marvel and he’s happy and he’s still my friend, and now I get to make this right too. Today there are new bards and new stories. Not long ago Mark and Alex went to Gotham to see Dan Raspler — who, it seems to me, was just a smart, ambitious kid last time I saw him and then became a big muckamuck like Jeph’s stepdad — to sell Dan on an idea about what the world would be like if all the super-heroes were to retire and their children, grandchildren and successors generally turn out to be schmucks. The theme of“Must There Be a Superman?,”that icon of another life, is the theme the new bards of KINGDOM COME continue. Maybe complete. It is about the time in the lives of Superman,Captain Marvel,Wonder Woman,Batman and the others,when they learn that they are not gods. And it is about the time in their lives when finally they learn that despite their limitations they must be potent and responsible anyway. Now is the time in the life of the human race when all of us need to learn these same things. That is why this story,despite its garish pri- mary-colored clothing, is an important one. The heroes of fable and fact to whose virtue we all aspire are not only colorful people leading vivid lives;they traditionally understand the value of human life in all its places and conditions.But real-life heroes,unlike many of the icons we have created,also understand human dignity and human immortality,and these are concepts that are lacking in,for example,Superman’s education. Heroes especially need to under- stand the value of the things of a life:its artifacts,its ideas,its loves. It is the markers you leave along that road that define you. It is the trees a man plants,the children he raises and the stories he tells that signify his life. It is the palaces a people build,the heritage they inspire,the art they create that makes their civilization. I’ve been trying to tell Superman for years that he mustn’t just save lives,he has to spit-polish the real estate too. He’s never understood that. He never got it until Mark and Alex told him. They got through to him,finally,and for that I’m proud of them. In KINGDOM COME, Mark and Alex draw a dichotomy between the human race and what we call SO I WENT TO GOTHAM TO SEE THE BARD AND I HAD MAYBE A DOZEN LITTLE GERMS OF IDEAS PACKED UNDER MY SCALP. 20 A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Make no mistake. This is not, in its strictest sense,“director’s cut” material. These aren’t rediscovered“missing pages”that somehow got lost behind Alex’s filing cabinet on Tuesday. They do, however, comprise a sequence Alex had envisioned painting from very early on: Orion on Apokolips, having usurped his father Darkseid’s throne. Alex never lost the desire to paint this image, not even after (striking though it might be) we could find no room for it within the strict page count of the original monthly series. The elbow room of an expanded collected edition, however, gave Alex the opportunity to indulge himself — and you. But what to make of this after-the-fact sequence? We didn’t even know where to put it within the narrative until using Orion suggested Orion’s brother-of-sorts, Mr. Miracle, Super-Escape Artist. How could we use him? Well...who better to design an inescapable gulag? Would Superman think of that? Not necessarily... but Orion would suggest it if Superman were to come to Apokolips asking to use the planet as a prison, a dumping ground. Still, the Last Son of Krypton would never suggest uprooting natives from their home- world. However, given where we were in the story just before gulag construction began, Superman would absolutely consult with Orion, the ultimate Dog of War. In fact, their conversation would allow us a chance to touch upon something missing from our original series: Superman’s inability to comprehend the dark potential of his own power... — Mark Waid EVOLUTION THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORION PAGES JIM KRUEGER and ALEX ROSS STORY JIM KRUEGER SCRIPT DOUG BRAITHWAITE and ALEX ROSS ART TODD KLEIN LETTERING ALEX ROSS COVERS JIM KRUEGER and ALEX ROSS STORY JIM KRUEGER SCRIPT DOUG BRAITHWAITE and ALEX ROSS ART TODD KLEIN LETTERING ALEX ROSS COVERS lame Bob McKee. I mean, it is his fault. He changed my view of villainy. For those who don’t know Bob McKee, he’s Hollywood’s Master of the Mystic Arts when it comes to writing all things related to story. I’ve taken his class more than once. If you’ve seen the Charlie Kaufman movie, Adaptation, that’s the class being taught. It’s called Story. And it’s worth every bit of the cost. It’s not just about writing; it’s about humanity and how we view life and people. One of the most amazing things that McKee says is that when you write an antagonist, you always write him, in his or her mind, as the protagonist. That means that every villain of a story, to be a good villain, must believe himself to be the hero. Not the villain at all. According to McKee, a villain’s reasons must make sense according to his viewpoint. His pur- poses must be good. In the book The Disney Villain, the writers and designers talk about the necessity of creating villains that people can relate to, that every character in a piece is a potential villain given the right combination o events and circumstances. Could any of us do that in that situation? Would we really lie? Could we possibly cheat? In so doing, how much of our audience would agree that that was the right thing to do? Gone are the days of the over-waxed mustache and maniacal laugh and human-sized logger’s buzz-saw. No more does a villain raise his head from his sleep in the morning to consider what “evil” he might do that day. No. Even if no one else sees it, the villain, in his mind, is the hero. That is where true evil resides—in the belief that his or her personal good is capable in navigating and speaking to the universal good. In Lord of the Rings, it’s Gandalf the Grey not wanting to take the Ring to rule all rings in fear that he would use it for good. Perhaps that is his greatest moment of heroism. If he had used the power for good, he knew he would become evil. I blame Bob McKee. I think some fans blamed me. Too many interviews have begun with the words “How can you make the villains make that much sense? I mean, Lex Luthor’s right. How are you going to deal with that?” Well, it’s a twelve-issue series. The book you hold in your hand will, I’m convinced, only begin to deal with com- plexities of true heroism and true villainy that show themselves in the story Alex, myself and Doug have sold ourselves into slavery for. Of important note is this. I am completely in Alex’s debt. No one in the industry has trusted me more or been a better friend and advocate. The work he and Doug are doing in these pages is so exciting, so amazing, that I’m a little surprised you’re still reading this and haven’t jumped forward to get to the good stuff. o if the villains think they’re the heroes, where does that leave the heroes? How to they view themselves? The story you’re about to read will deal with this issue as well. But I’d like to suggest this distinction. Perhaps this is the difference between a hero and a villain: A villain will seek to defeat a hero for the villain’s sake; A hero will seek to defeat a villain for the villain’s sake. It’s a fight to save the enemy at the same time that it is a fight to defeat him. This is my distinction, at least. It still doesn’t answer how the heroes view themselves, or even each other. For example, how does Superman view his fellow members of the League? Alex was very passionate as we began that I should find ways to reinforce the friendship between Superman and Batman. The following words were a personal exercise to understand how Superman would view his teammates. It also kind of serves as an introduction to the characters. B INTRODUCTION by Jim Krueger ...the villain, in his mind, is the hero. That is where true evil resides. S Diana Prince: WONDER WOMAN Diana is one of the Amazons of myth. For some, slavery can breed hatred, but not for her. Diana’s love for freedom is so great that she fights for it at all costs, using all manner of Amazonian weaponry at her disposal. Diana is perfect. She doesn’t know it. And that just makes her more perfect. J’onn J’onzz: MARTIAN MANHUNTER J’onn J’onzz is a Martian. He is the last of his kind, a shape-changer, and has had many identities since first coming to Earth. All of them, though, have been as a friend to mankind. I have no idea how old he is. I sometimes fear that J’onn allows me to make too many mistakes for the sake of my own wisdom. Hal Jordan: GREEN LANTERN Hal Jordan was selected by a dying alien to become a champion for Earth and the surrounding star system. He was given a ring that can give shape and power to the wearer’s imagination. I would not always have made the same choices Hal has. But that’s why, I suppose, the ring chose Hal and not me. Arthur Curry: AQUAMAN Arthur Curry’s father was a lighthouse keeper. His mother came from a realm far under the sea. Her death shortly after Arthur was born made Arthur the King of the Seven Seas. His father made him a hero. Sometimes terrible things happen. They’ve happened to each of us. And we have been changed by these tragedies, transformed. So don’t be afraid when dark clouds gather and madmen scream and make threats. It’s not the end of the world. Not if we can help it. JUSTICE VOLUME ONE Published by DC Comics. Cover and compilation copyright © 2006 DC Comics. All Rights Reserved. Originally published in single magazine form in JUSTICE #1-4. Copyright © 2005, 2006 DC Comics. All Rights Reserved. All characters, their distinctive likenesses and related elements featured in this publication are trademarks of DC Comics. The stories, characters and incidents featured in this publication are entirely fictional. DC Comics does not read or accept unsolicited submissions of ideas, stories or artwork. DC Comics, 1700 Broadway, New York, NY 10019. A Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. Printed in Canada. First Printing. ISBN: Cover color by Alex Ross • Publication design by Brainchild Studios/NYC Dan DiDio Senior VP-Executive Editor • Joey Cavalieri Editor-original series • Michael Wright Associate Editor-original series Rachel Gluckstern Assistant Editor-original series • Anton Kawasaki Editor-collected edition • Robbin Brosterman Senior Art Director Paul Levitz President & Publisher • Georg Brewer VP-Design & DC Direct Creative • Richard Bruning Senior VP-Creative Director Patrick Caldon Executive VP-Finance & Operations • Chris Caramalis VP-Finance • John Cunningham VP-Marketing Terri Cunningham VP-Managing Editor • Stephanie Fierman Senior VP-Sales & Marketing • Alison Gill VP-Manufacturing Rich Johnson VP-Book Trade Sales • Hank Kanalz VP-General Manager, WildStorm • Lillian Laserson Senior VP & General Counsel Jim Lee Editorial Director-WildStorm • Paula Lowitt Senior VP-Business & Legal Affairs • David McKillips VP-Advertising & Custom Publishing • John Nee VP-Business Development • Gregory Noveck Senior VP-Creative Affairs • Cheryl Rubin Senior VP-Brand Management • Jeff Trojan VP-Business Development, DC Direct • Bob Wayne VP-Sales IN LEAGUE Bruce Wayne: BATMAN I was not there to stop the bullets that claimed the lives of Bruce Wayne’s parents. If I had been, Wayne would never have spent the rest of his child- hood training in a cave for a one-man war on crime. I never knew my biological parents. Never experienced the end of the world the way Batman has. I wish there was a way to con- vince my friend that this does not mean we are not alike. There has to be a way to show him that I cannot shut out the cries of a suffering mankind, or close my eyes to the violence done in shadow. Barry Allen: FLASH For police officer Barry Allen, it was a shot from the heavens in the form of a lightning bolt that changed his life. That lightning flash mixed and fused certain chemicals together to empower him to cross countries and oceans in the blink of an eye. Barry and I have raced each other many times. Sometimes he lets me win. He warned them what would happen. He was a scientist, a man of imagination and foresight. His name was Jor-El. He even offered them a solution, a prototype rocket he had constructed to transport the entire Kryptonian race to another world. But they laughed and called him a fool. And Krypton died. But not before my parents placed me in the rocket in hopes that I would reach Earth. They sent me to safety faster than a speeding bullet. I am Clark Kent: SUPERMAN Earth is different than the world of my birth. What would have been impossible for me to do there, is less than a thought here. I can fly. I never tire. I can see through almost anything. Even through the worst of circumstance, I can see the tomorrow to come. As can the other members of the Justice League I wonder sometimes if the men that laughed and disrespected my father for his belief that his world was in danger lived long enough to realize their mistake.... DC Comics 23
  14. 14. 6 THE NEW BARDS: An Introduction by Elliot S. Maggin 10 CHAPTER ONE: Strange Visitor 58 CHAPTER TWO: Truth and Justice 110 CHAPTER THREE: Up in the Sky 158 CHAPTER FOUR: Never-Ending Battle 206 EPILOGUE: One Year Later… 216 MEMORIAL: Keys to Original Covers 218 FROM HERE TO KINGDOM COME: Mysteries Unveiled, Secrets Revealed by Mark Waid 222 ICONS OF VIRTUE by Alex Ross 223 SKETCHBOOK: Norman McCay 224 The Spectre 225 The League 241 A Silent Cavalry 259 Titans 267 Wild Cards 277 A New Breed 293 GENESIS: Developmental Art by Alex Ross 301 KEYS TO THE KINGDOM: An Annotated Guide 307 GALLERY 326 EVOLUTION: The Development of the Orion Pages 328 TESTAMENTS: A Checklist of Kingdom Come Appearances 334 DC DIRECT GALLERY 336 GENERATIONS: A Kingdom Come Genealogy 338 CURTAIN CALL: The Kingdom Come Cast 339 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS & BIOGRAPHIES 340 WITNESS TO THE END by Clark Norman Ross TABLE OF CONTENTS the meta- human race. It is the source of conflict throughout the story. And the story’s synthesis is the realization that this distinction is false. As clearly as another hero, Mahatma Gandhi, asserted that he is a Hindu as well as a Muslim — as well as a Christian, a Jew or a Buddhist if that becomes appropriate — so do we learn here that the most ordinary among us are heroes, and the most colorful and vivid among us are quite ordinary and flawed. It is a conclusion to which our new bards lead us as elegantly and precisely as Socrates led us through an argument or Pythagoras led us through a geometric proof. Even super-heroes need to grow. We know that now. When you read KINGDOM COME, you will too. If we were to peek in on the lives of the people of the Earth in generations to come, surely we would think we were gazing upon Olympus. And of course, again, we would be wrong. They are our children, our grand- children and our successors who will surely stride the Earth as titans in those days, wearing our own features and our own shortcomings. They are our messengers to that resplendent future. And they will bring with them into their time whatever values and iconography that we have to offer them today. Here in the pages that follow is an admirable start.To cite the sentiment of another old friend whom I miss (And if you travel west anytime, Alan, come find me, will you?):This is an imaginary story…aren’t they all? — Elliot S! Maggin Where the Wind Hits Heavy New Year’s,1997 IF WE WERE TO PEEK IN ON THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE OF THE EARTH IN GENERATIONS TO COME, SURELY WE WOULD THINK WE WERE GAZING UPON OLYMPUS. 21A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Each page of KINGDOM COME went through various stages of production and development. The first stage (not pictured here) was the preliminary outline. This summarized an entire sequence from the story. Consulting with the editors, Dan Raspler and Peter Tomasi, Mark then wrote a detailed script which paced the story by breaking down the contents of each page. The dialogue and the setup for each and every panel were presented in text for Alex to then visually represent. Before producing full-size artwork, Alex drew small thumbnail roughs which allowed him to work out compositional problems. This provided an opportunity for all involved to check the pacing of the story prior to producing the actual finished art. Once all notes, modifications, and approvals were received, the thumbnail images were transferred onto oversize boards that eventually became the finished artwork. Copies of the pencilled art were made in order for Peter Tomasi to map out the placement of the word balloons. (Note the differences between the script and the art, which necessitated a reorganization of the placement of the word balloons within the various panels.) The balloon placements were then sent to Todd Klein, the letterer, so he could create and letter the word balloons from the script. In most cases, lettering is done directly on the art board. For KINGDOM COME, as with most painted books, the finished lettering was placed on acetate overlays. Alex then rendered the images with gouache paints. First, he did a mono- chromatic black & white stage to fully detail all the forms, and then he transparently layered over the color . Some opaque painting and air- brushed lighting effects were also used. The letter- ing and painted art were then combined and sent to the separator to produce the finished comic page.PENCIL ARTWORK (actual size:11 1/8”x 17 1/2”) THUMBNAIL ROUGH (actual size: 3 1/8”x 4 15/16”) An example of one of the many photo references used by the artist. FINISHED PAINTED ART (the finished version of this page can be found on page 105) KINGDOMCOME Dedicated to CHRISTOPHER REEVE who makes us believe that a man can fly. 7A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E it I, like Mark and Alex, have to believe in heroes. I do. I believe in Superman. For real. I really believe in Wonder Woman, so help me. I believe in Santa Claus. I believe that men have walked on the moon. I believe that every Passover Elijah the prophet comes over for a sip of wine. I believe in metaphors. Metaphors are real. That is why the Scriptures are composed not only of the proverbs and prophecies that Pastor McCay, in the pages that follow, spouts in involuntary reflex; but that is why those Scriptures surround and embrace those pronouncements in stories — the allegories and metaphors — that teach us our values. Here before you is a clash of good against evil, of course, but more than that. There are clashes of judgment, clashes among different interpretations of what is good and of what is justice, and clashes over who is to suffer the wages of the evil born of our best intentions. This is a love story. This is a story of hatred and rage. This is the Iliad. This is a story of how we — we ourselves; you and I — choose to use whatever special powers and abilities we have, when even those powers and abilities are only a little bit beyond those of mortal men. This is a story about truth obscured, justice deferred and the American way distorted in the hands of petty semanticists. Super-hero stories — whether their vehicle is through comic books or otherwise — are today the most coherent manifestation of the popular unconscious. They’re stories not about gods, but about the way humans wish themselves to be; ought, in fact, to be. They’re the successors to the stories that once came from the hoedown and the campfire and the wandering bard. We — all of us — come up with these stories all the time around dorms and carpools and along cafeteria lines at work and at school. Here’s one: I have a friend named Jeph. You know Jeph. I was maybe nineteen or twenty and he was maybe twelve or thirteen and I was a student at this college and Jeph’s stepdad was a big mucka- muck at the college and stepdad and I made friends. I went over to stepdad’s house for dinner one day and Jeph and I got to talking there about our common ground: our mutual love for super-heroes and their stories. We came up with a nifty story over mom and stepdad’s dinner table. See, I’d just sold my first comic-book script, a Green Arrow story called “What Can One Man Do?”and I had a problem. I had a meeting soon with Julius Schwartz, the Bard of Bards, to see whether I was a one-trick pony or I could do this sort of thing again. I had to come up with a hit-it-outta-the-park idea for a Superman story or else spend the next three years in law school. I guess I told Jeph a few of my ideas and I guess Jeph told me a few of his. And Jeph came up with this thing he called“Why Must There Be a Superman?” It was about the Guardians of the Universe planting a new idea in Big Blue’s head. The idea was that maybe, in his zeal to preserve life and ease the path of the human race, Superman was keeping ordinary everyday good humans from growing on their own. Maybe he was killing the butterfly by helping it out of the chrysalis. Not for sure, but just maybe. That was Jeph’s idea. So I went to Gotham to see the I BELIEVE IN SUPERMAN. FOR REAL. I REALLY BELIEVE IN WONDER WOMAN, SO HELP ME. I BELIEVE IN SANTA CLAUS. I BELIEVE THAT MEN HAVE WALKED ON THE MOON. I BELIEVE THAT EVERY PASSOVER ELIJAH THE PROPHET COMES OVER FOR A SIP OF WINE. 6 A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E In the waning moments of the twentieth century, the super-hero is Everyman. Look at the way we live: traveling over the Earth at astounding speeds with unimaginable ease; communicating instantly at will with people in the farthest corners of the globe; engineering economies, driving environ- mental forces, working wonders. If a person from only a hundred years or so in the past could look in on our lives, that person would suppose that we were not mortals, but gods. He would be bowled over by what the most ordinary among us could do with a car or light switch or an automatic teller machine. This is the way many of us have always looked upon our super- heroes — as though they were gods. Our person from a lost century would be wrong about us, of course, but no more wrong than we are about our heroes. In the story that you hold in your hands, Mark Waid and Alex Ross tell us that our proper response to the inexorable march of progress that has brought us to this place and time in the history of civilization is to find a way to confront it responsibly. Not modestly. Not unself-consciously. Not with faith in a power greater than ours to descend from the sky and set things right despite our best efforts to screw up. We have an obligation to know who we are and where we are and what we can do. We have an obligation to understand the ramifications of the things we do, and to choose to do them — or not — with our eyes open. That is what KINGDOM COME is about. As I write this, I am completing a novel — about a hundred thousand words, one strung after the other without pictures other than the occasional free-standing illustration by Alex Ross — called KINGDOM COME. It is an elaboration in prose of the story that follows. In order to write WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO UNDERSTAND THE RAMIFICATIONS OF THE THINGS WE DO, AND TO CHOOSE TO DO THEM — OR NOT — WITH OUR EYES OPEN. THAT IS WHAT KINGDOM COME IS ABOUT. THE NEW BARDS AN INTRODUCTION bºy Elliot S. Maggin 227A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E To get to the personal roots of the character, I wanted to illustrate the farmer’s son, revisited in his later years, after he had removed himself from the super-hero business for a time. His gray temples extend into his beard and long hair, betraying a sense of his surrendering to his age. While I played up the carpenter role as well for its obvious symbolism, the bare-armed, workman look for Superman is one of his earliest, coming partly from the 1942 George Lowther novel and many pre-costume drawings by Shuster. In the earliest visual concepts for this project I was aiming in the Frank Miller/DARK KNIGHT RETURNS direction, where Superman hadn’t aged in 20 years. As others had pointed out to me, my drawings already gave him a time-worn, weathered look. It occurred to me that it better suited the character to experience as many of the humbling aspects of humanity as he could, and aging naturally would offset his more godlike attributes. My version of Superman was the most satisfying visual and emotional accomplishment of KINGDOM COME to me, as he stands out as the most compelling figure I’ve ever illustrated. SUPERMAN 226 A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Superman’s design was certainly the starting point of the entire series’look. If I wasn’t as inspired by his appearance, the rest of the characters would have held no interest for me. Fortunately DC allowed me to hark back to the classic Shuster-style broad body and bone structure with the wide head, short hair (a big request at the time) and a constant squint. I was heavily influenced by the Fleischer cartoon features based on Joe Shuster’s designs, with his old-fashioned“S”logo on a black shield. This same look can be found in a few other places in the early comics themselves and always stood out to me as a dramatic way to go with the design. The stylistic change I brought to the letter is meant to show the passage of time. As it has changed since 1938, it could further transform into the simplest graphic possible. DOMCOMEMark Waid Alex Ross with Todd Klein D C C O M I C S , N E W Y O R K , N E W Y O R K KINGDOMCOME The KINGDOM COME series proved to be so popular that it spawned a novelization (and an audio book of said novel), numerous items of merchandise, and a semi-sequel in 1999 that actually took place in current-day DC continuity, planting the seeds for KINGDOM COME’s possible future. Not only that, but a number of other creators were so inspired that they introduced, into their own books, characters, concepts and/or designs that first appeared in the KINGDOM COME miniseries. A partial list of the most notable K.C.-related appearances, references and merchandise follows. (For DC Direct product, see pages 334-335). TESTAMENTS A CHECKLIST OF KINGDOM COME APPEARANCES 23A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E SUMMER Kingdom Come Extra — A limited-edition trading card set is released by Fleer/SkyBox. Kingdom Come T-Shirt I — A T-shirt from Graphitti Designs featuring an original illustration by Alex Ross is released (see pages 324-325). FALL JLA ANNUAL #1 — The Brain Trust makes a current day appearance in a backup story. JANUARY TEEN TITANS #15 — Roy Harper, Arsenal, adopts a“Red Arrow”-inspired costume. FEBRUARY NEW YEAR’S EVIL: GOG #1 — The first appearance and origin of Gog (whom we learn raises Magog from childhood) is explored in a one-shot written as part of a“5th-Week”event in DC Comics’publishing schedule focusing on villains. MARCH Kingdom Come (Warner/Aspect) — a 352-page novelization is released written by Elliot S. Maggin, which is an adaptation of KINGDOM COME by Mark Waid & Alex Ross. Kingdom Come: Audio Dramatization (Time Warner Audio Books) — an audio version of the above book adapted by John Whitman. Approximately three hours in length and featuring a full-cast recording, this audio dramatization also featured guest voices such as Mark Waid, KINGDOM COME’s editor and assistant editor Dan Raspler and Peter Tomasi, novelization editor Charles Kochman, Batman editor/writer Dennis O’Neil, Executive Editor Mike Carlin, and other members of DC’s staff. OCTOBER JLA ANNUAL #2 — Magog makes a very brief cameo appearance. NOVEMBER SUPERMAN:THE MAN OF STEEL #1,000,000 — The Metal Men combine to form Alloy. DECEMBER THE FLASH #143 — The Kingdom Come Kid Flash (Iris West) makes a modern-day in-continuity appearance. FEBRUARY JLA/TITANS #3 — Victor Stone, a.k.a. Cyborg, adopts his Kingdom Come“Robotman”look in this story. THE KINGDOM #1 — The first issue of a multiple-part“5th-week event”of one-shots, featuring a storyline set in present-day continuity. The villainous Gog threatens to annihilate Superman by killing him over and over again as he works his way back through time. THE KINGDOM: KID FLASH #1 THE KINGDOM: NIGHTSTAR #1 THE KINGDOM: OFFSPRING #1 — Plastic Man’s son is introduced as the title hero. THE KINGDOM: PLANET KRYPON #1 THE KINGDOM: SON OF THE BAT #1 THE KINGDOM #2 — The concept of “Hypertime”is introduced. MARCH THE FLASH #146 — The Kingdom Come Kid Flash returns for the“Chain Lightning” storyline, and stays until issue #149. SUPERBOY #60 — Gog makes a cameo appear- ance in the beginning of a multipart storyline where Superboy explores Hypertime. WONDER WOMAN #142 — Wonder Woman’s Kingdom Come“eagle armor”is shown on display in her Wonder Dome. She continues to wear the armor in battle on occasion. APRIL THE FLASH 80-PAGE GIANT #2 — The Kingdom Come Kid Flash is featured in a solo story. 1999 1996 1997 1998 More thumbnails showing an early sequence in the book. DAN DIDIO Senior VP-Executive Editor DAN RASPLER Editor-original miniseries PETER J.TOMASI Assistant Editor-original miniseries ANTON KAWASAKI Editor-collected edition ROBBIN BROSTERMAN Senior Art Director PAUL LEVITZ President & Publisher GEORG BREWER VP-Design & DC Direct Creative RICHARD BRUNING Senior VP-Creative Director PATRICK CALDON Executive VP-Finance & Operations CHRIS CARAMALIS VP-Finance JOHN CUNNINGHAM VP-Marketing TERRI CUNNINGHAM VP-Managing Editor STEPHANIE FIERMAN Senior VP-Sales & Marketing ALISON GILL VP-Manufacturing RICH JOHNSON VP-Book Trade Sales HANK KANALZ VP-General Manager,WildStorm LILLIAN LASERSON Senior VP & General Counsel JIM LEE Editorial Director-WildStorm PAULA LOWITT Senior VP-Business & Legal Affairs DAVID MCKILLIPS VP-Advertising & Custom Publishing JOHN NEE VP-Business Development GREGORY NOVECK Senior VP-Creative Affairs CHERYL RUBIN Senior VP-Brand Management JEFF TROJAN VP-Business Development, DC Direct BOB WAYNE VP-Sales Published by DC Comics. Cover, introductions and compilation copyright © 2006 DC Comics. All Rights Reserved. Originally published in single magazine form in KINGDOM COME #1-4. Copyright © 1996 DC Comics. All Rights Reserved. All characters, their distinctive likenesses and related elements featured in this publication are trademarks of DC Comics. The stories, characters and incidents featured in this publication are entirely fictional. DC Comics does not read or accept unsolicited submissions of ideas, stories or artwork. DC Comics, 1700 Broadway, New York, NY 10019 A Warner Bros. Entertainment Company Printed in China. First Printing ISBN: 1-4012-0768-5. ISBN 13: 978-1-4012-0768-7. Slipcase and cover art by Alex Ross. KINGDOM COME font created by Alex Ross & Todd Klein. Publication design by Brainchild Studios/NYC. In Elseworlds, heros are taken from their usual settings and put into strange times and places — some that have existed or might have existed, and others that can’t, couldn’t or shouldn’t exist. 8 A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Bard and I had maybe a dozen little germs of ideas packed under my scalp. I’d try this one on him. I’d toss him that one. I’d pitch him another one. Some of them he liked; some of them he didn’t. Some of them inspired ideas of the Bard’s own; some of them made him snort or snore. By the end of a couple of hours — they were a loud, intense cou- ple of hours, as hours I spent with the Bard of Bards always would be — I was emotionally exhausted and still he wanted to hear more. So I dredged up this idea about what might happen if the Guardians came calling on Superman with the tiniest little criticism of how he was going about his job. Now you’re talking resh stuff, the old man let me know. He got excited. He yanked people in the from the hall and made me repeat the idea for them. I called the story “Must There Be a Superman?”and Saint Curt and Murphy drew it and it made me happy and I put the words in Superman’s mouth pretty much steadily for the next fifteen years and never went to law school. And I swear I did not have a clue where the idea had come from. Who knows where ideas come from anyway? I didn’t remember — still don’t remem- ber, in fact, but I believe Jeph — until Jeph told me about his con- tribution years later. Like twenty or so years later. Jeph has never suffered, I don’t believe, for my inconsiderable oversight, and in fact has always been my friend. He’s done well, too. With his buddy Matthew he wrote the first great super-hero movie of the modern period, Commando with Arnold Schwarzenegger, and lots of other great stuff. And one day later on I was editor of Jeph’s first comic-book series of his own, an eight-issue masterpiece with Tim Sale called CHALLENGERS OF THE UNKNOWN. Now he writes for Hollywood and he writes for DC and Marvel and he’s happy and he’s still my friend, and now I get to make this right too. Today there are new bards and new stories. Not long ago Mark and Alex went to Gotham to see Dan Raspler — who, it seems to me, was just a smart, ambitious kid last time I saw him and then became a big muckamuck like Jeph’s stepdad — to sell Dan on an idea about what the world would be like if all the super-heroes were to retire and their children, grandchildren and successors generally turn out to be schmucks. The theme of“Must There Be a Superman?,”that icon of another life, is the theme the new bards of KINGDOM COME continue. Maybe complete. It is about the time in the lives of Superman,Captain Marvel,Wonder Woman,Batman and the others,when they learn that they are not gods. And it is about the time in their lives when finally they learn that despite their limitations they must be potent and responsible anyway. Now is the time in the life of the human race when all of us need to learn these same things. That is why this story,despite its garish pri- mary-colored clothing, is an important one. The heroes of fable and fact to whose virtue we all aspire are not only colorful people leading vivid lives;they traditionally understand the value of human life in all its places and conditions.But real-life heroes,unlike many of the icons we have created,also understand human dignity and human immortality,and these are concepts that are lacking in,for example,Superman’s education. Heroes especially need to under- stand the value of the things of a life:its artifacts,its ideas,its loves. It is the markers you leave along that road that define you. It is the trees a man plants,the children he raises and the stories he tells that signify his life. It is the palaces a people build,the heritage they inspire,the art they create that makes their civilization. I’ve been trying to tell Superman for years that he mustn’t just save lives,he has to spit-polish the real estate too. He’s never understood that. He never got it until Mark and Alex told him. They got through to him,finally,and for that I’m proud of them. In KINGDOM COME, Mark and Alex draw a dichotomy between the human race and what we call SO I WENT TO GOTHAM TO SEE THE BARD AND I HAD MAYBE A DOZEN LITTLE GERMS OF IDEAS PACKED UNDER MY SCALP. 20 A B S O L U T E K I N G D O M C O M E Make no mistake. This is not, in its strictest sense,“director’s cut” material. These aren’t rediscovered“missing pages”that somehow got lost behind Alex’s filing cabinet on Tuesday. They do, however, comprise a sequence Alex had envisioned painting from very early on: Orion on Apokolips, having usurped his father Darkseid’s throne. Alex never lost the desire to paint this image, not even after (striking though it might be) we could find no room for it within the strict page count of the original monthly series. The elbow room of an expanded collected edition, however, gave Alex the opportunity to indulge himself — and you. But what to make of this after-the-fact sequence? We didn’t even know where to put it within the narrative until using Orion suggested Orion’s brother-of-sorts, Mr. Miracle, Super-Escape Artist. How could we use him? Well...who better to design an inescapable gulag? Would Superman think of that? Not necessarily... but Orion would suggest it if Superman were to come to Apokolips asking to use the planet as a prison, a dumping ground. Still, the Last Son of Krypton would never suggest uprooting natives from their home- world. However, given where we were in the story just before gulag construction began, Superman would absolutely consult with Orion, the ultimate Dog of War. In fact, their conversation would allow us a chance to touch upon something missing from our original series: Superman’s inability to comprehend the dark potential of his own power... — Mark Waid EVOLUTION THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORION PAGES 24 DC Comics
  15. 15. 26 DC Comics DC Comics 27
  16. 16. DC Comics 29 HARD WIRED FOR YOUR BRAND 30 million readers get into comics every month PLUGGED IN TO POPULAR CULTURE Comics are the driving force behind major trends in film, TV, publishing, music, technology, fashion, gaming and all other forms of popular entertainment DEEP ENGAGEMENT FOR KIDS, TEENS AND ADULTS There are 12 million DC Comics readers across 3 key audience segments COMICS TODA THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! C O N T I N U E DC COMICS I KIDS I TEEN/YA I ADULT I DIGITAL I MARKETING/PROMOTION I RATES, DATES & SPECS I CUSTOM PUBLISHING I CONTACT THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! D C C O M I C S DIGITAL DC COMICS I KIDS I TEEN/YA I ADULT I DIGITAL I MARKETING/PROMOTION I RATES, DATES & SPECS I CUSTOM PUBLISHING I CONTACT THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! D C C O M I C S CUSTOM PUBLISHING DC COMICS I KIDS I TEEN/YA I ADULT I DIGITAL I MARKETING/PROMOTION I RATES, DATES & SPECS I CUSTOM PUBLISHING I CONTACT THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! D C C O M I C S TEEN/YOUNG ADULT GROUP DC COMICS I KIDS I TEEN/YA I ADULT I DIGITAL I MARKETING/PROMOTION I RATES, DATES & SPECS I CUSTOM PUBLISHING I CONTACT DC COMICS I KIDS I TEEN/YA I ADULT I DIGITAL I MARKETING/PROMOTION I RATES, DATES & SPECS I CUSTOM PUBLISHING I CONTACT THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! DC COMICS CUSTOM PUBLISHING DC Comics is the only significant comic book publisher with in-house editorial, creative and project management staff dedicated to custom crafting solutions designed to connect with your target across a range of media and help achieve your marketing objectives. We work wonders. • Custom Comic Books, Magazines & Inserts • Digitally Animated Comics • Websites, Sitelets & Widgets • Podcasts, Audio & Video • Broadcast & Online Animation • Print Ads & Advertorials • In-School Programs • Sweepstakes & Contests • Grassroots Marketing Events • Branded Marketing Materials • Enhanced Media Buys THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! DC COMICS TEEN/YOUNG ADULT GROUP (INCLUDING MAD) Connect with 5.3 million teen/young adults in the pages of these action-packed publications created especially for this elusive audience. Exciting and diverse DC editorial content, written and drawn by the most creative talents in comics today, captures the imagination of readers better than any other medium and is totally in sync with today’s demanding audience. DC COMICS TEEN/YOUNG ADULT GROUP DYNAMICS Entertainment Enthusiasts • 35% attend movies opening weekend • 42% have seen 6 or more movies in the past 90 days They Got Game • 90% play video games • 45% play online games • 21% bought 6 or more video games in the last 12 months Connected to Community • 65% own cell phones • 65% love playing sports Majorly into Music • 64% own an MP3 player • 42% download music On Top of the Trends • 49% like to keep up with the latest fashions The Stats DC COMICS I KIDS I TEEN/YA I ADULT I DIGITAL I MARKETING/PROMOTION I RATES, DATES & SPECS I CUSTOM PUBLISHING I CONTACT Network Rate Base . . . . . . . . . . . .2,000,000 Network Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,386,000 Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monthly Number of Titles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-45 DC Composition . . . .78% male, 22% female Median Age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Median HHI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,000 Newsstand Sales . . . . . . .98% DC, 48% MAD Subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . .2% DC, 52% MAD SOURCES: Simmons Teen Study Spring 2007; MRI Prototype, Spring 2007 THIS IS WHERE THE ACTION IS! 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  17. 17. Batman Begins 400 Concept sketches along with the final paint scheme (above) for the Batman Begins 400 event car. It was later announced that the custom design would be applied to Mark Martin’s Ford Taurus and sponsored by Pfizer. 30 DC Comics DC Comics 31
  18. 18. 32 DC Comics DEAR EDUCATOR, You strive to make each day a journey of discovery for your students with new subjects, ideas, or information. Because you are always looking for new tools to inspire the sense of wonder, the educational toy experts at Action Products International, Inc. (APII) have teamed up with the award-winning curriculum specialists at Young Minds Inspired (YMI) to bring you this cross-curricular classroom program based on the fascinating line of I DIGTM educational toys. The I DIG series of educational toys, winners of the prestigious Family Fun Toy of the Year Award, introduces the world of archeology and paleontology as students dig for treasures ranging from dinosaur bones to pirate loot to ancient Egyptian artifacts. This program contains three activities in science, with extension activities in visual arts, geography, and language arts. These subjects are presented in creative ways that highlight the magic of discovery. Each activity also contains a take-home component to involve family members. The program also includes a colorful wall poster for your classroom. You and your students don’t have to be familiar with I DIG toys in order to use these activities. Make as many photocopies of these copyrighted materials as you need to and share with colleagues. These materials will help open students’ eyes to the wonder of discovery, while helping you to achieve your curriculum goals. Sincerely, Joel Ehrlich President and former teacher WHO SHOULD USE THIS PROGRAM? This cross-curriculum program can be used with students in grades 1-3. PROGRAM COMPONENTS ¥This teacher’s guide ¥Three student reproducibles on science, with extension activities in visual arts, geography, and language arts, each with take-home components ¥A colorful dinosaur wall poster ¥A reply card for your important feedback PROGRAM OBJECTIVES ¥To capitalize on students’ natural interest in dinosaurs to help them develop a deeper appreciation for the past ¥To improve student skills in science, visual arts, geography, language arts HOW TO USE THIS TEACHER’S GUIDE Photocopy each of the three activity masters and distribute a set to each of your students. Also photo- copy the I DIG Dinosaurs fact sheet and distribute it to each student. HOW TO USE THE WALL POSTER Display the wall poster in a prominent place in your classroom. Review the five dinosaurs shown by comparing the bones to the way the dinosaurs looked when they lived. Then, use the fun facts to have students think about their own bodies. is the only company developing free, creative and innovative classroom materials that is owned and directed by award-winning former teachers. All YMI teaching materials are pre-certified and approved by our exclusive Educational Advisory Board. E-mail us at feedback@ymiclassroom.com or visit our Web site at www.ymiteacher.com to send feedback and download more free programs. How dinosaurs and other treasures of history teach us about today. How dinosaurs and other treasures of history teach us about today. TM YOUNG MINDS INSPIRED
  19. 19. WE STAND UP TO A CHALLENGE! WE STAND UP TO A CHALLENGE! 5’ 0” 4’ 11” 4’ 10” 4’ 9” 4’ 8” 4’ 7” 4’ 6” 4’ 5” 4’ 4” 4’ 3” 4’ 2” 4’ 1” 5’ 0” 4’ 11” 4’ 10” 4’ 9” 4’ 8” 4’ 7” 4’ 6” 4’ 5” 4’ 4” 4’ 3” 4’ 2” 4’ 1” Don’t miss Available on DVD September 27, 2005 Don’t miss Available on DVD September 27, 2005 RODNEY THE ROBOT CAN STAND UP TO A CHALLENGE. OUR CLASS CAN, TOO! The A-Mazing Rodney! The inventor Bigweld usually says, “Let’s get to inventin’!” But now he’s in trouble. He’s needs to get away from the evil Ratchet. Only you can help Rodney and Fender find—and save— Bigweld. Trace the path they should take to Robot City. Show your parents how you helped save Bigweld. Rodney Fender ROBOTSROBOTS on DVD is available everywhere beginning Sept. 27, 2005. Bigweld2 ©2005 YMI, Inc.Ratchet ROBOT CITY The A-Mazing Rodney! Rodney’s friends were in trouble when Ratchet stopped making new ________________. They were ______________________ apart. So Rodney saved the ____________________. He helped the ‘bots put themselves back together. He helped one with a missing _________________________ and another with his spare __________________________. When all the ‘bots were _______________________________, they saved Robot City. Bigweld got his _______________________________ back and Rodney was a __________________________! (plural noun) (verb with an “ing”) (noun) (noun) (noun) (adjective) (noun) (noun) The Nuts and Bolts of Silly Storytelling In the film Robots, robots rock! They have exciting adventures and lots of laughs, too. Let’s add some more. Fill in the blanks with your own wacky words to make this crazy mixed-up tale even crazier! Ask your parents for their silly words, too. The Nuts and Bolts of Silly Storytelling ROBOTSROBOTS ©2005 YMI, Inc. 3 on DVD is available everywhere beginning Sept. 27, 2005. A RIVETING RIOT OF FUN AND GAMES FEATURING A RIVETING RIOT OF FUN AND GAMES FEATURING DEAR PARENT OR CAREGIVER: Children do better in school when they have confidence and say, “I can do this! I can shine!” Watching the hilarious and heartwarming animated film Robots is lots of fun for your whole family. It’s also a great way to help children learn how much they can achieve when they believe in themselves. Aided by a group of misfit mechanical friends, a small-town robot named Rodney embarks on the adventure of a lifetime as he heads for the big city to pursue his dreams. Rodney ultimately learns, “You can shine, no matter what you’re made of.” Featuring an all-star voice cast of Ewan McGregor, Halle Berry, Greg Kinnear, Mel Brooks, Amanda Bynes, Drew Carey, Jim Broadbent, and Robin Williams, Robots amazes with groundbreaking visual style that pushes the boundaries of animated filmmaking. Robots is a dazzling, fun-filled feast for the eyes and a riveting good time for all ages! This special Robots mini-magazine contains fun games and activities. We hope that you enjoy them with your child, and that you plan to watch Robots together! You can find more great games online at www.robotsdvd.com. And, you can find Robots on DVD at stores every- where beginning September 27, 2005. Sincerely, Joel Ehrlich President and former teacher (andkidstoo!) (andkidstoo!) © 2005 TWENTIE TH CENTURY FOX HOME ENTERTA INMENT LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVE D. THE YMI TEACHING KIT A typical kit consists of a teacher’s guide, usually in the form of a 9 x 12 folder, reproducible masters for distribution to students and additional supporting materials (mini-magazine and growth chart in this case). 34 Young Minds Inspired At the end of Adventures in Animation, you learn that Slim doesn’t know he’s a virtual actor. He thinks he’s real—or at least “as real as it gets.” Imagine that, for his next appearance, Slim is offered a starring role in a television series that you create.What would you call your series? What would it be about? What would Slim’s role in the series be? Think about the character you created on the last activity sheet. What is the name of your character? In the space at right (above), write a few sentences that describe the character you created. For example: What kind of personality does it have? Where does it live? What does it eat? What does it like to do? On the back of this paper, make an outline of a story in which your character would star if you made your own film.In Adventures in Animation, you learn how animators create characters like Slim. Now it’s time to think about the future.What do you think will be next? Do you agree with Phil who, in the film, says that virtual actors will replace real ones someday? What would virtual actors be able to do that real ones could not? Do you think technology could make virtual actors seemingly real? Why, or why not? Use the space below to organize your thoughts. Then, on a separate piece of paper, describe what you think will happen with animation in the future. ACTIVITY 4 WHAT’SNEXT? ACTIVITY 4 WHAT’SNEXT? A part B part C part REPRODUCIBLEMASTER 11 Animated characters like Slim in Adventures in Animation begin as a tiny piece of surface called a polygon. Thousands of polygons are pulled, pushed, stretched, and combined to build the models for characters like Slim. What do you know about polygons? Circle the letter of each shape below that you think is a polygon. How many of the polygons are regular polygons? Write an “R” inside each of those polygons. Write the letter of each of the remaining shapes below and explain why those shapes are not polygons. Now, use polygons to make your own original animated character (see example below). Use a separate sheet of paper to build your character. (Don’t worry, it doesn’t need to be as complicated as Slim. You can make something as simple as a fish or even “invent” a brand new kind of creature.) When you’re finished, make some notes about the kinds of details you would add to make your character even more interesting.You can find polygons allaround you if you look forthem (a stop sign, for example). Conduct your own search for the hidden polygons in your world. In the space below, list what you find. ACTIVITY 3 PLENTYOFPOLYGONS A part Bpart C part REPRODUCIBLEMASTER 9 ACTIVITY 3 PLENTYOFPOLYGONS Did you know that to create virtual actors likethe ones you see in Adventures in Animation,it all starts with the human body? To capture the motion of the live actor who helps create the virtual actor, animators attach electronic sensors to body joints and points on the actor’s face. When the actor moves, a computer picks up the sensor readings.Then, it stores them as data the animator can use to make theanimated figure—the virtual actor—move. How much do you know about how you actually move in real life? Answer True or False to each statement below: _________________ 1. Muscles work in pairs so they can pull indifferent directions. _________________ 2. An adult doesn’t have as many bones asa baby does. _________________ 3. The biggest muscle in your body is in your leg. _________________ 4. Bones aren’t living things. _________________ 5. The muscles in your eyes may move as oftenas 100,000 times a day. _________________ 6. The smallest bone in your body is in yourhand. _________________ 7. Some muscles only work when you tellthem to. _________________ 8. The muscles that your brain controls arecalled involuntary muscles. Muscles and bones can’t do it alone. You wouldn’tbe able to move if you didn’t have joints. Joints are formedwhere two bones come together. See how many joints you can find on the drawing at right. (Hint: Start at the top of your head and think about all the ways you can move as you mentally travel down your body to your toes.) Circle each joint you find. Now that you know a little more about howyou move, imagine that you are an animatoron the team that created the virtual actors inAdventures in Animation. How would you capture the live actor’s motion if you were in charge of animating Slim? Draw an “x” at each point on the drawing where you would put an electronic sensor. ACTIVITY 2 MAKINGTHEMOVES ACTIVITY 2 MAKINGTHEMOVES Apart Bpart C part REPRODUCIBLEMASTER 7 The film Adventures in Animation is about actors who seem real—but they’re not! They are “virtual” actors, created by computer, who seem to pop off the screen. How do the different parts of the eye work together, and where does the brain fit in? To find out, label the parts of the eye in the drawing below, and do some research to find out what each part does. CORNEA OPTIC NERVE IRIS PUPIL LENS RETINA VITREOUS It looks like Slim is dancing around in the box- ing ring in the film. But he isn’t really moving. It’s an optical illusion. That’s because there’s a difference between what we think we see and what we really see. Look at the two lines below. Which one is longer? Measure each line to see if you are correct. There are lots of different optical illusions. For example, if you look down a long, straight road, it looks like the sides of the road are getting closer together. They aren’t, of course. This is an illusion that is related to perspective. Perspective gives a feeling of depth to a flat surface. Filmmakers use still pictures called “frames” to create the illusion of motion on the screen. To find out how this works, follow your teacher’s directions. As you hold the stapled end of your stack of paper in one hand, bend back the top of the strips with your other hand and let them flip forward. What do you see happening to your drawing? Why? Have you ever stared at a camera when the flash went off? Did you notice a dark spot dancing in front of your eyes for a few seconds? That’s called an afterimage. Follow your teacher’s instructions to see an afterimage now! ACTIVITY 1 IT’SANEYETHINGACTIVITY 1 IT’SANEYETHING Apart Bpart Cpart A REPRODUCIBLEMASTER A B C D 5 part D MATERIALS Only the activity sheet is needed. TEACHINGTIPS Before students begin, lead a discussion about the virtual world (the world created by anima- tors) versus the real world. What are the differences? What does Slim mean at the end of the film when he says, “This is as real as it gets”? That is, do students think the lines between the virtual world and the real world will someday become less distinct—or have we already reached that point? You may want to have younger students collect and share pictures of animated figures that they think range from the least to the most lifelike. Then, students can find out about the different techniques that were used to create them. Encourage students to be as creative as they can during this exercise. Remind them that, because they have designed their own character—and because this is a virtual world—they can have the character do anything. Would they base the way their character moves on a real-life example like a person or an animal? Would their character be active and ambitious like Slim —or cool, calm and collected? It’s time for your students to let their imaginations run wild! To set the stage, lead a class discussion about the technological changes that have occurred in the world during your students’ lifetimes. Do they remember a time before cell phones, instant messaging, and digital cameras? Have them interview a parent or another adult to learn about the changes that have occurred in the adult’s lifetime— perhaps color televisions, microwave ovens, and air- conditioned automobiles. Students can also develop a timeline of all the changes that have taken place or decide which item they take for granted today that would be the most difficult to give up. RELATED ACTIVITY Ask students to think about the impact if virtual actors were to replace real actors in the films they see. Would ticket prices be cheaper because virtual actors would be less expensive to hire than real ones? Why, or why not? Would it cost more or less to make virtual films? Lead a class discussion in which students can share—and defend—their posi- tions. OBJECTIVES TO EXERCISE IMAGINATION AS STUDENTS DEVELOP CREATIVE WRITING SKILLS. TO CONSIDER HOW THE USES OF TECHNOLOGY WILL GROW AND CHANGE IN THE FUTURE. WHAT’SNEXT? WHAT’SNEXT? ACTIVITY 4 ACTIVITY 4 Apart Bpart Cpart TEACHER’SGUIDE 10 MATERIALS White paper • Pens or pencils TEACHINGTIPS Introduce the relationship between the virtual actors in Adventures in Animation and shapes known as polygons by reviewing the beginning of Part A with students. Tell students that polygons are simple, closed figures formed by three or more line segments. “Simple” means that the line segments do not cross each other, and “closed” means that your pencil will end up where it started when you draw the poly- gon. Explain that a polygon can take many different shapes and can have any number of sides. Note that while some polygons (known as regular polygons) have sides that are all the same length and angles that are all the same, not all polygons do. Then, ask students to identify the polygons on the activity sheet and to explain why the other figures are not polygons. Invite volunteers to draw other examples of polygons. ANSWERS: Figures B, C, E, G, and H are polygons. Figure B is a regular polygon because all the sides are the same length and all the angles are the same. These figures are not polygons for the reasons indicated: Figure A (it is not a closed figure), Figure D (some of the line segments cross each other), and Figure F (one side is not a line segment). Before beginning this section, review with your students how the animators created Slim in the film. They used a computer program that allowed them to combine polygons of all shapes (about 100,000 in Slim’s case) to prepare a drawing that is called a wireframe because it looks like bent wire. Once the wireframe was finished, they smoothed it out, painted it, and added all the details that made Slim look more real. The characters your students create will be much simpler, of course. Finally, challenge students to find as many polygon shapes as they can in the world around them. You might even want to take the class on a “polygon walk.” Encourage students to look for polygons in man-made structures (building shapes, window panes, bricks, sections of concrete sidewalks, etc.) and in nature (the patterns in tree bark or in leaves). RELATEDACTIVITIES •Encourage students to do some research to learn even more about polygons. For example, polygons with 10 or fewer sides are named for the number of sides they have. Figures with three sides are triangles, figures with four sides are quadrilaterals, etc. Students can create a chart that includes a drawing of each polygon and its name. •Have students work in small groups with a ball of yarn to create polygons as pieces of progressive art. One student should hold the end of the yarn and pass the ball to the next student to make the first line segment. That student passes the yarn to anoth- er student, who makes the next line segment, and so on. During this part of the activity, students should be standing within an arm’s length of one another so they can pass the yarn without changing the shape of their polygon. Once they have completed their first polygon, students should move farther apart and take turns changing the shape of the polygon— pushing, pulling, and stretching it just like the animators in Adventures in Animation did—until they are satisfied that they have created their idea of the “perfect” polygon. OBJECTIVES TO UNDERSTAND HOW POLYGONS ARE USED IN COMPUTER-GENERATED IMAGERY. TO DISCOVER POLYGONS IN OTHER CONTEXTS. TO IMPROVE STUDENT OBSERVATIONAL SKILLS AND UNDERSTANDING OF SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS. PLENTYOFPOLYGONS ACTIVITY 3 PLENTYOFPOLYGONS ACTIVITY 3 Apart Bpart Cpart 8 TEACHER’SGUIDE MATERIALS Library and Internet resources TEACHINGTIPS Review with students the beginning of Part A and ask them to think about the bones that enable them to stand upright and the muscles that allow them to move. After they attempt their answers to the quiz, ask them to do some research to learn more about bones and muscles. ANSWER KEY: 1. True. In fact, muscles can’t push; they can only pull. 2. True. A baby is born with more than 300 bones. Some of them later fuse together, leaving an adult with only 206 bones. 3. False. The biggest muscle is the gluteus maximus (the muscle you sit on). 4. False. Bones are made up of living cells, just like everything else in the body. 5. True. They are the busiest muscles in the body. 6. False. The smallest bone is the stirrup. It’s in the ear, and it can be as small as one-tenth of an inch. 7. True. They are known as voluntary muscles, like the ones you use when you walk. 8. True. Muscles such as your heart work on their own, without you consciously doing anything. Talk with your students about the joints that occur where two bones connect. Explain that there are two categories of joints—immovable joints, such as those that join the bones in the skull, and movable joints that permit the hands, legs, arms, neck, spine, and mouth to move. Talk about ball-and-socket joints that allow for a rotating movement of the arms and legs and hinge joints that enable the back-and-forth movement of the knees and elbows. Other kinds of joints include gliding joints (spine) and pivot joints (neck). Then, ask your students to circle all the joints they can find on the diagram. Talk with students about how animators sometimes use electronic sensors to capture the motion of a live actor. They attach the sensors to selected body joints and key facial points. When the actor moves, a computer picks up the sensor readings and uses them as data to make the animated figure—the virtual actor—move. This is an example of computer-generated imagery (CGI). RELATEDACTIVITY One way to think of animators is as puppeteers who create and manipulate incredibly versatile puppets. Ask your students to learn about marionettes—the kind of puppets that are controlled by strings. Older students might create their own simple marionettes. OBJECTIVES TO LEARN HOW THE SKELETAL AND MUSCULAR SYSTEMS WORK TOGETHER TO ALLOW US TO STAND AND MOVE. TO CONSIDER THE TECHNOLOGY THAT MAKES THE COMPUTER-GENERATED IMAGERY (CGI) POSSIBLE IN FILMS SUCH AS ADVENTURES IN ANIMATION. MAKINGTHEMOVESMAKINGTHEMOVES ACTIVITY 2ACTIVITY 2 Apart Bpart Cpart TEACHER’SGUIDE6 MATERIALS Library and Internet resources • Rulers • Staplers Pens, pencils or markers • Sheets of unlined white paper Scissors or paper cutter TEACHINGTIPS Before students begin to research the parts of the eye, ask them to identify parts of the eye they already know, and encourage them to explain the function of each part. Discuss how the various parts of the eye work with the brain to produce vision. For older students, cover the names of the parts of the eye before copying the activity sheet. Ask for a show of hands to determine which of the two lines, AB or CD, your students think is longer. After they measure the lines, talk with them about optical illusions. Explain that the way the end segments of the line are positioned makes AB appear to be longer, even though both lines are identical in length. Provide some other examples of optical illusions, such as the way the moon appears larger when it is on the horizon than when it is high in the sky. Ask older students to give additional examples of optical illusions. Explain how a movie creates an optical illusion when a series of still pictures (frames) is projected onto a screen. Each frame is slightly different from the one flashed before. The frames appear at just the right speed (24 frames per second). The brain interprets the changing images as continuous motion because our eyes continue to see each image for a split second after it has disappeared. This is known as persistence of vision, when the eye connects the separate frames into continuous motion. Have students make flip books: 1. Cut sheets of unlined paper into 15 or more strips about 1 1/2 inches wide by 3 inches long. (You may wish to provide younger students with packets of pre-cut strips.) 2. Put the strips in a stack and staple them together at one end. Place the stack on a surface in front of you with the unstapled end closest to you. 3. Trace or draw the first figure from the activity sheet at the unstapled end of the first strip of paper. Trace or draw the second figure from the activity sheet in the same position on the last sheet of paper. Find the middle strip and draw an image that would appear halfway between the two images. Fill in the remaining strips to approximate the transition between the first and final images. When students have assembled their books, have them experiment with flipping the pages at different rates of speed. If the speed is too slow, the motion will be jerky; if it is too fast, the images will blur. Ask students to stare at the letter “A” on the activity sheet for one minute and then look at a sheet of plain white paper. They will see that the colors of the image and background are reversed—the “A” appears to be white, and the background appears to be black. Explain that this occurs because the eyes become tired staring at the white part of the paper. Because the letter “A” is not bright, the part of the eye that sees it (the retina) is resting. When the eyes shift to the plain white paper, the light on the part of the retina that has been resting appears brighter, so the “A” now appears to be white against a black background—even though the paper is blank. This is called an afterimage. OBJECTIVES TO DISCOVER HOW THE EYE AND THE BRAIN WORK TOGETHER. TO LEARN HOW FILMS CREATE THE ILLUSION OF MOTION BY TRICKING THE BRAIN INTO SEEING THINGS THAT AREN’T REALLY THERE. IT’SANEYETHINGIT’SANEYETHING ACTIVITY 1ACTIVITY 1 Apart Bpart Cpart TEACHER’SGUIDE 4 part D You already know that still pictures called frames are what make everything in films—including Adventures in Animation—appear to move. Twenty- four frames flicker across the screen each second. Between the frames, the screen is black, but you don’t notice it because your eyes and brain fill in the dark gaps with something called an afterimage. Have some family fun by making a motion toy known as a thaumatrope to see how your eyes and brain blend afterimages into one image. (The thaumatrope is nothing new. It was invented in the 1820s.) You’ll need two plain white index cards, a straw and some tape. HERE’S WHAT TO DO: STEP 1. Draw a picture of Slim’s face (or something else if you prefer) at the center of the first card. At the center of the second card, draw a picture of a blank TV screen. Make sure what you draw on the first card is slightly smaller than the TV screen. Tape the back of the first card to the top part of the straw. STEP 2. Place the back of the second card (with the TV screen) on the other side of the straw, against the back of the first card. Tape the edges of the cards together. STEP 3. Hold the straw between the palms of your hands, then twirl the straw quickly back and forth. When you twirl it at just the right speed, the picture you drew will appear as if it’s on the TV screen. LET’S MAKE A FILM!LET’S MAKE A FILM! It’s absolutely amazing how your eyes and your brain work together to produce the images you see. Each of your eyes sees the same object from a slightly different angle, and your brain combines the two separate images into one single 3D image. The science behind the images you see on the big screen is pretty amazing, too. For example, did you know that when Slim is bouncing around the boxing ring with Killer, he’s not really moving at all? That’s right—the people who made this film put together a whole series of still pictures of Slim (called “frames”)—each of which is just a tiny bit different from the one before. Then they project them fast enough to make you think you’re watching Slim move. That’s called an opti- cal illusion—when your brain is tricked into seeing some- thing that isn’t really there. Check out these two optical illusions: Which of the two bold lines in the figure above is longer?* (Make sure you measure them to find out.) Where is the dot in the cube above? Is it at the back of the cube? Or at the front? Okay, you know this is just a flat drawing, so what’s up? (That’s right! With this optical illusion, there are no right or wrong answers! It’s whatever your eyes tell you to believe.) OURAMAZINGEYESOURAMAZINGEYES *Ifyoumeasuredthetwolinesinthefirstdrawing,youknowthattheyareboththesamelength.
  20. 20. KRYPTO IS SPECIAL, SMART, BRAVE AND STRONG! Catch on Cartoon Network, Monday-Friday at 2:30 p.m. E/P. KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. © 2005 YMI, Inc. TM COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL Comic-Con International Comic-Con International began in 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in San Diego, CA with a total attendance of 145. 40 years later this block-buster, 4 day event that originally showcased comic books, science fiction/fantasy and film/television has expanded to include a larger range of pop culture elements, such as horror, anime, manga, animation, toys, collectible card games, video games, webcomics, and fantasy novels. The convention is the largest in the Western Hemisphere, and second largest in the World after Angoulême International Comics Festival in France, filling to capacity the San Diego Convention Center with over 125,000 attendees last year. Comic-Con International’s brand mark. 36 Young Minds Inspired Helpers Places Krypto and Kevin need your help. Choose a helper and a place. Reproducible Master Watch on Cartoon Network, Monday-Friday at 2:30 p.m. E/P. Streaky TM The Dog Star TM Patrol Krypto’s Rocket Ship Krypto’s Doghouse Activity 3 WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. • © 2005 YMI, Inc. Dear Parent or Guardian, In this activity of the I’m Special program, students practiced the important pre-reading skill of storytelling. Have them tell you about their story that is on the back of this paper. Be a special helper at home like Krypto. Reproducible Master Activity 2 I CAN BE SPECIAL LIKE KRYPTO Watch on Cartoon Network, Monday-Friday at 2:30 p.m. E/P. Krypto uses his special powers to help out. You can help out, too! KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. • © 2005 YMI, Inc. Reproducible Master Watch on Cartoon Network,Monday-Friday at 2:30 p.m. E/P. Here’s how I help! Activity 1 IF I HAD SUPER POWERS Dear Parent or Guardian, Your child is participating in a unique I’m Special teaching unit. Activities in the program use characters and themes from Cartoon Network’s animated series, Krypto, the Superdog, to support your child’s development in many areas, including reading readiness, mathematics, social-emotional growth, creativity and imagination. Krypto, the Superdog hails from the planet Krypton and has an amazing array of super powers. Special, smart, brave and strong, Krypto is just what every child wants to be!In this activity students drew themselves with a super power. Have them tell you about their drawing. Then share the super power you would like to have! KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. • © 2005 YMI, Inc. Helpers Places Krypto and Kevin need your help. Choose a helper and a place. ReproducibleMaster Watch on Cartoon Network, Monday-Friday at 2:30 p.m. E/P. StreakyTM The Dog StarTM Patrol Krypto’sRocket Ship Krypto’s Doghouse Activity 3 WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. • © 2005 YMI, Inc. Dear Parent or Guardian, In this activity of the I’m Special program, students practiced the important pre-reading skill of storytelling. Have them tell you about their story that is on the back of this paper. a including confetti, sequins, color and decorate rials provided. them complete g in the blanks children have t activity. E ACTIVITY s children mples by telling ial because she w the school he children are e trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. © 2005 YMI, Inc. Kevin TM DEAR EDUCATOR, Help your students get a great start to the school year with this free I’m Special teaching program. Award-winning curriculum specialists Young Minds Inspired (YMI) and Warner Bros. have teamed up to bring you this exciting learning guide, full of lessons to nurture students’ self-esteem and encourage imagination and creativity, all while supporting important readiness skills. In addition, each lesson promotes extended learning in a specific area, such as movement, block play, art and circle time. Leading the way in the I’m Special program is Krypto, the main character in Cartoon Network’s animated series, Krypto, the Superdog. Krypto hails from the planet Krypton. Along with his best pal Kevin and a host of other heroic animals, Krypto battles the forces threatening the people and animals of Metropolis. Special, smart, brave and strong, Krypto is just what every preschooler wants to be! The activities in the I’m Special program reinforce the message that each student is special in his or her own way. And, you can reward students with their own I’m Special stickers for a job well done. Viewing the program is not necessary to complete the activities, however, students who have seen the program may want to share Krypto’s many adventures. Krypto, the Superdog is on Monday-Friday at 2:30 p.m. E/P, on Cartoon Network. The materials in this kit are copyrighted, however, you may make additional copies for students and share the materials with other teachers. You can also download copies at www.ymiteacher.com Sincerely, Joel Ehrlich, President and former teacher YMI is the only company developing FREE, creative and innovative classroom materials that is owned and directed by award-winning former teachers. All YMI materials are pre-certified and approved by our exclusive Educational Advisory Board. E-mail us at feedback@ymiclassroom.com or visit our Web site at www.ymiteacher.com to send feedback and download more free programs. CREATIVE WAYS TO ENCOURAGE SELF-ESTEEM WHILE IMPROVING READING READINESS AND MATH SKILLS Another FREE Program from KRYPTO THE SUPERDOG and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © 2005 DC Comics. ®
  21. 21. ENIGMA BOOKS 38 Comic-Con International Comic-Con Event Shirts Designed by Brainchild Studios and produced through Graphitti Designs, the event shirt has consistently sold out since 2001, making it the most prized souvenir of the show. 2009 (volunteer) 2009 2008 2006 2005
  22. 22. 40 Enigma Books Enigma Books 41
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  26. 26. 48 Enigma Books Enigma Books 49
  27. 27. 50 Enigma Books Enigma Books 51
  28. 28. Brainchild Studios/NYC 330 West 38th Street, Suite 1503, New York, New York, 10018 p: 212.647.9278 e: info@brainchildstudiosnyc.com w: brainchildstudiosnyc.com
  29. 29. es to Staten Island. That “forgotten borough” is one of the most frequently requested locations I am asked n, when people want to know their status in the fictional DMZ world (the others are Hell’s Kitchen, Queens, o get to everything, eventually). My own personal experience with Staten Island, aside from listening to siting twice, once to scout locations for an ex-girlfriend’s film, and going to a college house party in se to draw upon for DMZ. collaborators on DMZ to supply me with their ultimate DMZ House Party playlists, or, in the words of king/house party/shout along/get fucked up/DMZ rock out mix tape songs... not the sappy ass love songs m talking TAKE ME DOWN TO THE HOSPITAL kinda shit here.” You heard the man. Boys? st): y e e se and e I’m ming e ove) s JEROMY COX (colorist): “Where Is My Mind” – Pixies “I Don’t Want To Hear It” – Minor Threat “The Choice Is Yours” – Black Sheep “Add It Up” – Violent Femmes “Party At Ground Zero” – Fishbone WILL DENNIS (editor, enabler): “Rocks Off” – Rolling Stones (from the BRIAN WOOD: “What’s It All About” – Reducer SF (kind of frat-posing-as-punk shit, but great sing-along material, and since it’s a song about striking out with women at a bar, it’s a totem of sorts to play at the start of a night) “Re-Ignition” – Bad Brains (I would find little wrong with playing nothing BUT Bad Brains all night long at a party, but maybe that explains why no one ever comes to mine) “Anything, Anything” – Buckcherry (ok, it’s a cover and Dramarama’s version wins in all other situations, but the speed and ferocity of Buckcherry’s makes that beer disappear. Another bad-luck-in-love song)* “Brave Captain” – FIREHOSE (SST – best record label ever?) “Peace of Mind” – Boston (for those final moments stumbling over empty cups at the end of the night) * “Wrong” – Archers of Loaf, spiritual substitute to be played if/when too many people make fun of you for Buckcherry. BRIAN WOODDMZ31 DMZ32 DMZ33 DMZ34 DMZ35
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